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Acquisition of Canadian Citizenship at Birth or by Derivation through a Parent or Spouse

Effect of Husband/Father's Naturalization in Canada on his Wife and Minor Child
Effect of father's naturalization in Canada on his minor children
Effect of husband's naturalization in Canada on his wife

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Effect of father's naturalization in Canada on his minor children
Prior to January 1, 1915 Under the law in effect during this period there was no provision for the inclusion of the names of children in a certificate of naturalization. If it can be shown that such children were minors residing in Canada on the date of the father's naturalization (or mother's naturalization, if she was a widow or if such children were born out of wedlock) or had entered Canada before January 1, 1915, while still minors, they are regarded as persons whose names were included in a certificate of naturalization and therefore they are Canadian citizens under Section 9(1)(a) (see appendix 1).
From January 1, 1915 to December 31, 1946

During this period there was a provision in the law for the inclusion of the names of minor children in a certificate of naturalization. If the name of a child was not included, he did not become a British subject and unless born in Canada, he is not a Canadian citizen.

NOTE: If over 21 when parent naturalized, child did not acquire Canadian nationality, even if name included on certificate of parent.

From January 1, 1947 to [as of March 1959]
Under the present [as of March 1959] law a child does not acquire Canadian citizenship through the naturalization of a parent. He must be granted citizenship in his own right and will be issued a certificate attesting to this fact. A responsible parent, as defined in appendix 2 may, upon becoming naturalized himself, apply for a certificate in behalf of his minor child.

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Effect of husband's naturalization in Canada on his Wife
Prior to January 1, 1915 Even though there was no provision for the inclusion of the wife's name in a certificate of naturalization of a husband, she automatically became a British subject with her husband. She would then become a Canadian citizen under Section 9(1)(b) (see appendix 1) if she had Canadian domicile on January 1, 1947.

From January 1, 1915 to January 14, 1932
There was a provision for the inclusion of a wife's name on a certificate of naturalization granted to her husband. If the name of a wife was included, she is a Canadian citizen under Section 9(1)(a) (see appendix 1) provided she was not an alien on January 1, 1947.

From January 15, 1932 to December 31, 1946
There was no longer a provision for including a wife's name on a certificate of naturalization granted to her husband. A wife did not become a British subject if her husband became one. She was permitted, however, to file within six months of the date of her husband's naturalization, a declaration of desire to be naturalized, thereupon she was deemed to be a British subject and was granted a certificate. She would then be a Canadian citizen under Section 9(1)(a) (see appendix 1).
From January 1, 1947 to [as of March 1959]
Under the present [as of March 1959] law a wife does not acquire Canadian citizenship or British subject status through the naturalization of her husband.

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Acquisition of Canadian Citizenship by Women Through Marriage
Prior to January 1, 1947

A woman marrying a British subject during this period automatically acquired a British subject status also. She would then become a Canadian citizen on January 1, 1947 under Section 9(1)(b)(ii) or (iii) (see appendix 1) if she still lived in Canada.

NOTE: Above is not all-inclusive as to acquisition of Canadian citizenship by married women.

From January 1, 1947 to December 21, 1948
During this period a woman did not acquire Canadian citizenship by marrying a Canadian citizen man. However, under British law, she still became a British subject by marrying a British subject man, and, so therefore, would be classified as a British subject residing in Canada.

From January 1, 1949 to [as of March 1959]
Under the present law [as of March 1959] a woman does not acquire either Canadian citizenship or British subject status automatically by marriage alone.

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