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Canadian Immigration reports

Selected extracts from Immigration and Quarantine reports, for Quebec Que., Halifax, NS, and St, John, NB, from the Canada Sessional Papers for the 1870s. Halifax and St. John reports contain details of ship arrivals.

1870 | 1871 | 1873 (sick immigrants) | 1877

34 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 64.) A. 1871

Years
Arrivals
1854
53,180
1855
21,274
1856
22,439
1857
32,097
1858
12,810
1859
8,778
1860
10,150
1861
19,923
1862
22,176
1863
19,419
1864
19,147
1865
21,366
1866
28,648
1867
30,757
1868
34,300
1869
43,114
1870
44,475

REPORT OF THE
MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE
For 1870
p.2
III IMMIGRATION

The immigration to the Dominion in 1870, did not exhibit the increase which was expected in 1869. Various causes may be assigned for this. The principal of these were the disturbed state of the Continent of Europe, and the revival of trade in Great Britain.
From the statistics which the Department has obtained from the Government Immigration Agents within the Dominion, it appears, however, that there was an increase in [p.3] the number who arrived by the St. Lawrence route, over the year 1869, great as was the increase in 1869, over previous years. The following statement shows the number of arrivals by the St. Lawrence route, at the port of Quebec, from the year 1854, to 1870:-

The total number of immigrants who arrived in the Dominion from all quarters, during the calendar year 1870, was 69,019.
There was a marked decrease in the number of immigrants who entered Canada by Suspension Bridge (Suspension Bridge was at Niagara, and would likely include those arriving via US ports, such as NY) and the inland ports of the Dominion in 1870, not only as compared with 1869, but also as compared with either of the two previous years. The total number who thus entered in 1870 was 23,857.
The following statement shows the comparitive number of immigrant arrivals for the last five years at all points of the Dominion, in as far as the Governent Agents have been able to obtain information.
 
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
Via the St. Lawrence
28,648
30,757
34,300
43,114
44,475
Via the Suspension Bridge and Inland
Ports of Ontario and Quebec
23,147
25,631
36,511
30,326
23,857
Via Halifax
781
366
448
437
Via St. John, New Brunswick
409
271
456
219
Via Miramichi (N.B.)
21
31
Total
51,795
57,578
71,448
74,365
69,019

p.4 Out of the 44,475 immigrants who landed at Quebec during the year 1870, 35,073 sailed from ports in the United Kingdom; and of these, 31,747 came from the regular lines of steamships.
The employment of Steamships in conveying emigrants from the United Kingdom to North America, has greatly increased withing the past few years. (transmigration!) In 1863 the proportion of those who took passage in steamships to Canada was only 45.85 per cent; in 1865 it rose to 73.50 per cent; in 1867 it further increased to 93.16 per cent; and in 1869, it still further rose to 94.99 per cent. In 1870 it was 90.51 per cent.

The advantage to the emigrant arising from the use of steam instead of sailing vessels, is very great, although the cost of passage is much higher. Besides making a very great saving in time, a steam vessel brings a cargo of emigrants to port in a far better condition of health, than a sailing vessel, and thereby lessens the danger of epidemics, as well as for the emigrants as for the country which receives them. This important result is illustrated by the fact that the sickly passengers landed at Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, are almost invariably taken from sailing vessels, especially after long voyages.

Read futher excerpts from this section of the 1870 report at Immigrants to Canada

p.8 The number of immigrants who passed through the Dominion, to proceed to the United States during the last five years, as ascertained by the Dominion Government Agents, may be stated as follows:-
 
The number of those reported by the Dominion Agents to have settled in Canada during the same period of five years, was as follows:-
1866
41,704
1867
47,212
1868
58,683
1869
57,202
1870
44,313
 
1866
10,091
1867
14,666
1868
12,765
1869
18,630
1870
24,706

It thus appears that there has been a steady and most gratifying increase as well, in the numbers, as in the relative proportion on immigrants settling in Canada since 1866. The figures given, it is true, show simply the numbers of those who announced themselves as coming to settle in Canada; and the natural subsequent movements of our population to and from the United States, may, to some extent, be held to affect their entire accuracy. Those movements, however, are in constant progress, and take place in both directions. It is not thought that they materially affect the question. And they certainly cannot do so at all, so far as the fact that this gratifying progress in favour of immigration to Canada is concerned. It may be added, that no means exist of ascertaining and recording arrivals of settlers along our inland frontier, except at those points mentioned in the reports of the Dominion Agents.
The national origins of the 44,475 immigrants landed at the Port of Quebec during the year 1870, as ascertained by the Dominion Agent at that port, were as follows:-
English
20,934
Irish
2,858
Scotch
3,279
German
595
Scandinavian
26,780
Other Origins
29
 
44,475

It may be remarked with reference to the first item in the above classification, that some of the immigrants reported as "English" were not strictly speaking such. This remark specially refers to Dock-yard labourers. (this reference is to the unemployed dockyard workers arriving on the Crocodile in 1870)

p.9 The number of deaths which occurred among the immigrants in the year 1870, during the voyage our is stated by the Quebec Agent to have been only 60; 52 of which were children and infants. The number of deaths in steamers (out of 33,164 passengers) having been only 11, or 0.03 per cent; the lowest average on mortality on record.
The deaths in Quarantine were also much below the ordinary rate, having been only six.

.....In consequence of the disturbed state in the Continent of Europe, it was considered advisable to suspend the operation of the Antwerp Agent, Mr. Simays (Canadian Agent for Continental Europe), and to recall, for the present, the Agent.
Mr. Simays accordingly closed his office in Antwerp at the end of the year, and returned to Canada....

See Vessels Arriving at Quebec 1870 With Assisted Passengers at Immigrants to Canada

pp.79-80 excerpt ...The arrangements made by the Montreal Steam Company for the comfort and convenience of the emigrants in transit have been in every respect satisfactory, and I have not received a single complaint. The price of passage for the season was £6.6-each adult--children under eight years half price--but a reduction was made for those sent out by charitable institutions--the rate charged being £4.10. A few complaints have been received of ill-treatment on board the vessels of other owners, but they were of little moment, and I have taken steps to prevent a recurrence of the alleged grievances.

My attention has been constantly drawn during the busy season by members of charitable societies, to the almost universal complaints made by the emigrants in their letters home concerning the treatment and accomodation they received on railways between Quebec and places in Ontario. One of the emigrants writing from Hamilton to the Honorable Reginald Capel, says:- "The unpleasant things on a sea-voyage, can well be put up with, but the horrid, dirty, filthy, jolting railway cars, made one say they wished they never had left the Old Country. We got into the cars on Monday afternoon, and got out on Wednesday afternoon---forty-eight hours packed together like a lot of pigs, without a chance to stretch one's legs, unless they laid on the dirty floor, where they stood a good chance of being trampled upon."...

pp. 96-99 excerpts from the 1870 Halifax and St. John Quarantine Reports
Halifax:
...During the year 1870, I have boarded and examined the following vessels, besides keeping up the usual inspection of steamers and sailing vessels carrying steerage passengers.

March 23rd, steamship City of Brussels, from Liverpool, G.B., bound to New York, put into this harbour for a supply of coals; one of the cabin passengers (Mr. Tilton, of Boston) was sick with smallpox. By permission of His Worship, the Mayor of the City and the City Medical Officer, the case was removed to the City Hospital for contagious diseases, where he ultimately recovered. The steamship having neither passengers nor cargo for Halifax, was allowed to coal under proper guards, and she left for New York the same night.
April 16th, R.M.S. Delta, (Mara) mate in charge--the Captain (Shaw) having been left at Bermuda on account of an accident--owned by Messrs. Cunard & Co., of Halifax, from St. Thomas via Bermuda, with one of the firemen sick with smallpox. I at once ordered the steamer from the wharf, where the mate had brought her, not knowing as he alleged, that the case was one of smallpox, or of a contagious nature. On the 18th (Monday), by permission of the Board of Health, the case was removed to the City Hospital, from whence he was subsequently cured. After the removal of the case, the Delta was thoroughly cleansed and fumigated, and the crew vaccinated. The Delta was detained in Quarantine until the 22nd (Friday), when she was allowed pratique.
June 1st, R.M. steamship City of Antwerp (Inman Line), from Liverpool, G.B., via Queenstown, with mails, &c. for Halifax, with a case of smallpox. The City authorities refused permission to have the case removed to the City Hospital. I at once took the precaution to keep the case isolated, and by proper guards to prevent any persons from visiting or leaving the steamer, and then allowed the mails and cargo to be landed. The City of Antwerp left this port at 3 o'clock on Friday morning (June 3rd), taking with her the smallpox case.
June 7th, R.M.S. Alpha, owned by Messrs. Cunard & Co., of Halifax, from St. Thomas via Bermuda. On the voyage to St. Thomas, after leaving Bermuda, three cases of smallpox occurred. The cases were landed at St. Thomas, and the steamer was thoroughly cleansed and fumigated. Twelve days afer leaving St. Thomas the Alpha arrived here, and as no new cases had occurred in the meantime, she was admitted to pratique.
July 11th, brig Jno. McDonald, from Philadelphia, with a case of bilious remittent fever. The case was sent to Hospital.
July 13th, American schooner, Frank A. Williams, from fishing, with a case of typhoid fever. Rendered medical assistance, and the schooner sailed the next morning, the master having refused to allow the case to be sent to Hospital.
July 19th, barque Prima Donna, from New Orleans, bound to Havre. The master, (Perkins) was suffering from hœmoptysis, and wished to be landed at Halifax.
July 24th, brig Marcella (McEachren, master), owned by Messrs. T. Butler & Co., of Halifax, from Cuba. The master's wife died on the passage, ten days before the arrival of the brig at Halifax. Disease not contagious.
August 2nd, brig Ruth (Allan, master), from San Iago de Cuba, bound to Montreal; S. McLean, master, and two seamen died in San Iago. One seaman sick on board with bilious remittent fever, was sent to Hospital.
August 5th, steamer Carlotta (Colby, master), from Portland; a child two years of age, died on the passage to Halifax, from convulsions.
August 9th, brig Mirella (Smith, master), from Falmouth, Jamaica, with a case of bilious remittent fever. The case was sent to Hospital. One seaman died on passage from Falmouth.
August 11th, H.M.S. Lapwing, from Jamaica, via Bermuda; cases of bilious remittent fever were all convalescent before arrival at Bermuda, but the vessel had been Quarantined there, and therefore showed the flag for inspection when entering this port.
August 12th, H.M. gun vessel Dart, from Havana, with a case of yellow fever convalescent.
August 31st, H.M.S. Racoon, from the West Indies, with cases of yellow fever convalescent.
October 10th, brig Kingston (Woods, master), owned by Messrs. Kinnear & Co., of Halifax, from Cuba. Two seamen died of yellow fever on the passage to Halifax.

St. John: (Partridge Island Quarantine Station)
During the year, the shipping that arrived had no infected persons on board that required to be landed at the quarantine station.....
February 18th, (International steam vessel) New Brunswick, landed two passengers from Portland, Maine, who afterward broke out with "Varioloid." One shewed the pustules shortly after arrival; the other ten days after. Not having been observed to exist on the vessel, the master and crew were not aware of the infection with those persons, nor could I find sufficient cause in proceeding against the master, who had previously received the quarantine Acts. The sick men were placed in isolated apartments under strict regulations, and no further cases occurred.
During the prevalence of the small pox in the United States, the passengers of those steamers were afterwards inspected previous to landing. I have every reason to believe that the owners and officers of the International Line make every effort to prevent infected persons coming in their boats from the United States. Every precaution is now being used by them in bringing the corpses of persons who were formerly sent here without such, or a knowledge of the disease the person died of. At present they cannot be forwarded unless with a certificate of two medical men, that their disease was not infectious, or if infectious, permission is required; that the neccessary precaution may be taken be hermetically sealing. Since the first of December last, in compliance with these instructions, several corpses have arrived by this conveyance.

During the period the small pox was epidemic in New York, at the commencement of the year, I visited several vessels coming direct; they were all allowed to proceed, not having any sickness.
April 21st, the steamship Syrian [sic - Anchor Line Tyrian] arrived from Glasgow and Liverpool via Halifax, with 18 passengers on board in good health; the first passenger vessel for the year allowed to proceed.
May 3rd, the ship Abyssinian arrived from Savannah, and anchored outside of Partridge Island with a quarantine flag. The mate had dysentery on leaving and one of the crew was ill with the same disease during passage. I found, on inspecting the vessel, the men had both recovered, except from the debility, that no danger was to be apprehended. The vessel was therefore discharged after purification.
July 29th, the steamship Syrian [sic - Anchor Line Tyrian] arrived again, second voyage from Glasgow and Liverpool via Halifax, with 30 passengers. Allowed to proceed after purification.
September 12th, the steamship Dorian (Anchor Line) arrived from Glasgow and Liverpool via Halifax, with 25 passengers. Allowed to proceed and enter the Custom House after inspection.
November 24th, the brig Maggie Cross from Havana, was inspected sailed on the 2nd. Two of the crew had yellow fever at Havana; none sick during the passage nor on arrival. Allowed to proceed after purification.

35 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 2A.) A. 1872

From the 1871 Annual Report of the St. John, N.B. Immigration Agent

p.66 ...There has been an increase this year in the number of immigrants arrived. Last year the whole number from all sources was 219; this year there landed at the port of St. John,
By Steamers from Glasgow and Liverpool  
642
From Quebec via Portland and the Gulf of St. Lawrence  
10
From New York by the International steamers  
44
Making a total of
 
696

The forty-four enumerated as coming from New York, were landed there from the Anchor Line Steamer Iowa, and having paid their passages through to St. John, were forwarded by the agents to this port. There are other arrivals from New York of immigrants who came to St. John, via that Port; but no correct estimate can be formed of the number; the officer in charge of the Immigration Department at Castle Garden, having refused to furnish any information in the matter.

...In November last, Miss Rye brought to St. John, eleven adults and forty-one children. They were eagerley taken up, and all placed in comfortable homes. They came out to Halifax in the S.S. Nestorian, of the Allan Line, and thence were conveyed by rail and steamer to this city. The applicants more than doubled the number of the arrivals. The expenses of transport from Halifax and maintenance, were defrayed by the Local Government.

pp. 93-98 excerpts from the 1871 Halifax and St. John Quarantine Reports
Halifax: (Lawlor's Island, Quarantine Station)
...During the year 1871, besides the usual inspection of the Mail and other steamers carrying emigrants or steerage passengers, the following vessels having sickness on board on arrival here, or during the voyage, have been boarded and examined by me.

February 27th, H.M.S. Racoon, 18 days from Bermuda; had had 15 cases of mild yellow fever--all convalescent. Admitted to Pratique.
March 17th, French Mail Steamer St. Laurent [Saint-Laurent], from Brest bound to New York, put in for coal had a case of modified small-pox, in second cabin, (female). Coaled and left for New York. Sunday March 19th--case convalescent.
April 21st, Steamer Alexandria (Anchor Line), Lees, Master , from Liverpool, G.B., thirteen days, bound to Halifax and St. John, N.B., arrived with all on board apparently healthy. On Sunday morning, April 23rd, two cases of small-pox in the incipient stage were discovered on board, one a quarter-master of the steamer, the other a steerage passenger. The steamer was immediately sent to the quarantine anchorage, where she discharged the remainder of her cargo and coaled. In the meantime the cases were removed to a shed on Lawlor's Island, (Quarantine Station), where the steerage passenger died Monday May 1st. The quarter-master recovered and was discharged May 26th. After the removal of the cases the steamer was as far as possible fumigated and cleansed, the infected bedding, &c. was also destroyed. The Alexandria left for St. John, N.B. Friday. April 28th, carrying with her all the passengers bound to that port.
April 23rd, R.M.S. City of Dublin (Inman Line), Allan, Master, from Liverpool, G.B. The surgeon reported a death from consumption during the passage; also a case of small-pox of five or six days standing. The mail and cargo were landed from, and the Steamer coaled at the quarantine anchorage. The Dublin left for New York very early on Wednesday morning, April 26th, taking with her the case of small-pox. This was before the shed was built on Lawlor's Island.
May 8th, barque James Ives, Carrol, Master, thirty-eight days from Liverpool, G.B., owned by Messrs. Esson & Co., of Halifax, and consigned to Messrs. B. O'Neil & Co., also of Halifax, arrived with two cases of small-pox, the second mate and steward. The cases were removed to the shed on Lawlor's Island. The remainder of the crew vaccinated. The infected bedding, &c., destroyed and the vessel thoroughly cleansed and fumigated. The barque was released from quarantine May 13 th, the second mate being at the same time discharged from the island; the steward was discharged, cured, May 26th.
June 6th, ship Harmonides, Logie, Master, forty-nine days from Liverpool, G.B., via Holyhead, (thirty-one days from Holyhead), with cargo of salt to Messrs. R. Boak & Co. of Halifax, arrived with a case of small-pox. Had one death from small-pox while at Holyhead. The case was removed to Lawlor's Island from whence he was discharged, cured, June 22nd. The ship after being throroughly cleansed and fumigated was released from quarantine June 10th. The crew had been vaccinated.
June 13th, barque Maggie, McNutt, Master, from Liverpool, G.B., bound to Philadelphia, arrived here in distress not having hands enough to work the vessel, and having four cases of small-pox on board, and one death, a boy, from the same disease during the voyage (May 24th). The cases first and second mates and two seamen were removed to Lawlor's Island. The Maggie having been thoroughly cleansed and fumigated and the healthy portion of the crew vaccinated, cleared for Philadelphia June 23rd, taking on board the first mate and one seaman who were discharged, cured, from the island. The second mate and seaman were subsequently discharged, cured. The former June 24th, the latter who had the disease in the mosr severe form, after a protracted convalesence, on the 8th of August.
June 30th , the barque Sir R.G. McDonnell, Anderson, Master, from Liverpool, G.B., via Queenstown. The Sir R.G. McDonnell put into Queenstown to land Captain Wilkie on whom small-pox had appeared since leaving Liverpool. The barque arrived here after a passage of thirty-one days from Queenstown, without having any sickness during the voyage, and the vessel being in a perfectly clean state was allowed to proceed to the city.
July 11th, H.M.S. Royalist, from Havana, via Matanzas. Left Matanzas June 30th, since when six cases of yellow fever had occurred on board, two of which had died on arrival here, the four remaining cases were found perfectly convalescent and the vessel was admitted to Pratique.
September 22nd , the barque Scottish Bride, Geitzer, Master, Wellington, N.C., bound to Stettin, Germany, arrived here with the captain and three seamen sick with swamp fever, and one seaman with both thigh bones broken; the seamen were admitted to the Marine Hospital, and the vessel was admitted to Pratique.
November 2nd, the ship Kooria Mooria, Hildruth, Master, from Brunswick, Georgia, bound to Hull, G.B., arrived here leaky and having two seamen slightly ill from swamp fever. Admitted to Pratique, seamen not sick enough to go to Hospital.
November 6th, Steamship Franklin (Stettin Line), Dryer, Master, from Stettin, Germany, via Copenhagen and Christiansand, put in here for coal and water. Left Stettin October 10th, Copenhagen October 12th, Christiansand October 15th. The captain reported that after leaving the latter place there were twenty-four cabin and 608 steerage passengers on board, and that nine deaths from diarrhœa had occurred in the steerage during passage, six of which were children under five years. The Franklin took in coal and water and cleared for New York, on Wednesday morning, November 8th. One cabin passenger, whose destination was Halifax, being permitted to land. The remainder of the passengers, cabin as well as steerage, having had no direct communication with the shore during the stay of the steamer in this port. Subsequently on the arrival of the Franklin in New York it was ascertained that the statement of the captain at Halifax, relative to the sickness and deaths during the voyage, was false, and that instead of having had only nine deaths from diarrhœa, forty deaths from cholera had taken place before her arrival at Halifax, the first on the 23rd October, thirteen days after leaving Stettin and eight days after leaving Christiansund [sic - Christiansand].

The fact that several cases of cholera occurring in the vicinity of Halifax, the first of which could be traced to a person who had been engaged in coaling the Franklin, led to my suspension from office, and an investigation being ordered into the circumstances, the result of which investigation has not yet transpired. ...........(Dr. Wickwire reported after Dr Gossip's suspension)........the brigantine Little Fury, Hyman, Master, from Ramsgate, England, bound to St. John, N.B. in ballast put into this port on the 25th December, short of provisions...........

St. John: (Partridge Island Quarantine Station)
...proceedings of the quarantine station St, John, for the year 1871...

January 17th, the barque Marquis of Bute arrived from Dakir, Africa, and the brig Annie from Montevideo. After inspection were discharged.
April 10th, the steamship Assyria (Anchor Line) arrived from Glasgow and Liverpool via Halifax, with thirty-one passengers, the first vessel commencing the year with passengers. Discharged up the harbour.
April 17th and 20th, the steamships' Trojan and Lady Darling arrived without passengers or sickness.
April 30th, the steamship Alexandria (Anchor Line), 1,056 tons, Lees, master, arrived from Glasgow and Liverpool via Halifax, with thirty-three passengers, crew forty-four, remained in Halifax five days in consequence of a passenger and seaman having small-pox on board--who were removed from the vessel and placed in quarantine--the vessel afterwards fumigated and allowed to proceed, all on board having been vaccinated. On inspecting the said vessel here, as a further precaution I landed the steerage passengers on Partridge Island to have their bedding washed on board. vessel then discharged from quarantine on 2nd of May, and the passengers discharged from Partridge Island in a tug boat on the 3rd of May after purification. The expenses were paid by the vessel.
May 1st, the ship Madge Wildfire was inspected, from Liverpool, one of the crew died on the voyage from scrofulous ulcers.
May 3rd, the barque Eblana, 650 tons, Scott, master, anchored at the station, from Liverpool. Six days after sailing one of the crew showed small-pox; very ill on arrival; the pustules assumed an unhealthy appearance; the vessel was placed in quarantine and the sick man landed in hospital on the Island. After vaccinating the crew and disinfecting the vessel, pratique was allowed on the 8th.
May 3rd, the ship New Lampedo, 1,099 tons, Seely, master, from Liverpool, was inspected with a quarantine flag. Six days after leaving a seaman, the carpenter, broke out with small-pox. The vessel was placed in quarantine, and the sick man landed on the island with all his baggage. Ship discharged on the 8th, after precaution of vaccination and purification.
June 1st, the steamship Acadia (Anchor Line), 592 tons, Tannock, master, arrived from Glasgow via Halifax with 261 passengers, one death, an aged person, and one birth during the passage. On inspection I found the passengers and crew free from infection, and allowed the vessel to proceed and enter the custom house.
June 6th, four passengers arrived from Liverpool via New York to St John, in the International steam vessel, all healthy. Discharged.
June 14th, ship Cynosure, 1,417 tons, Costello, master, arrived from Liverpool. Two days out, on the 23rd of April, one of the crew broke out with small-pox, and died on the 1st of May, his clothing was destroyed. Vessel anchored four days off Savannah, and proceeded to St. John. No other cases during the voyage, detained fifty hours in quarantine for purification, &c.
June 14th, ship Liverpool, 1,654 tons, Smith, master, from Newcastle. Five days after sailing one of the crew took ill with feverish symptoms, then small-pox pustules, (he was isolated on the vessel), the sick man was landed on Partridge Island. Vessel placed in quarantine received pratique after five days purification &c.
July 10th, ship Lancaster, 1,560 tons, from Mobile on the 14th of June. Day after sailing, two of the crew had chills and fever in intermittent type. On the 24th another was attacked, and died on the 28th from congestion after chills. Vessel was discharged after twenty-four hours observation and purification, &c.
July 16th, brig J.& G. Wright, 267 tons, Wright, master, from Philadelphia, with one of the crew ill of typhoid fever, in a low collapsed state unfit for removal. He died little over three hours after my inspection. Every attention and comfort was given to the man in the vessel. Buried him on Partridge Island. Vessel discharged after three days purification.
July 19th, steamship Acadia (Anchor Line), 592 tons, Tannock, master, arrived at the station from Glasgow with 146 passengers, free from infection. Discharged after inspection.
September 10th, steamship Alexandria (Anchor Line), 1,052 tons, Lees, master, from Glasgow and Liverpool via Halifax, sixty-nine passengers; no sickness nor deaths during the voyage. Received pratique after inspection.
September 18th, barque Norton, 5,367 tons, from New Orleans, sailed on the 20th of August. On day of sailing, the master died of yellow fever; no other cases. Vessel lay five days in quarantine, and discharged by me after purification on the 23rd.
September 20th, steamship Trinachria had twenty-three passengers, all well.
December 1st, ship Cambrian, 1,124 tons, David Post, master, from Hamburg. Sailed on the 27th of September, touched at the Downs twenty-four hours. Cholera prevailed in the city of Hamburg previous to leaving. No sickness during the voyage, vessel in ballast taken from the sea. Thermometer 4° above zero [F].

In consequence of small-pox existing in New York and Philadelphia, the vessels were looked after from those ports as well as others.

37 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.9.) A. 1873 [sic - 1874]

Statement showing the names of Immigrants admitted to Hospital (Quebec) during the year 1873

Names
Age
Born
Church
Occupation
adm'd
disch'd
cured
disch'd
relieved
Died
Alfred Webb
7
England Eng. Church   Apr 18 May 08    
William Wagner
45
Belgium " Gardener Apr 30 May 30    
Charles Wooton
50
England " Labourer May 21 Sept 07    
James Peterson
26
Scotland Prebyterian Labourer May 16 June 16    
Thomas Jennings
36
England Eng. Church Shoemaker May 22 May 23    
Jesse Ward
27
England " " May 22 June 03    
William Mowatt
18
Scotland Presbyterian Farmer May 30 June 30    
G. Broadbent
21
England Eng. Church Labourer June 27 Aug 05    
John Stevins
31
England " " July 02 July 04    
Em. McGibbon
40
Ireland Presbyterian Spinster July 11 Aug 18    
John Watson
24
Ireland Rome Tinsmith July 13 Aug 05    
John Rich
30
England Eng. Church Labourer July 18 July 24    
George Skelton
46
" " Servant July 25 July 31    
Henry Smith
32
" " Rubber
Manufacturer
Aug 03   Sept 18  
James Challis
32
" " Bricklayer Aug 13 Aug 23    
John Ormond
10mo
" "   Aug 26 Sept 18    
Mary Ormond
37
" " Houswife Aug 26 Sept 18    
John Spargo
38
" " Carpenter Sept 03 Sept 09 Removed to Smallpox Hosp.
Henry Ash
42
" " Labourer Sept 08     Sept 21
Mary Richards
and child
35
" " Dressmaker Sept 13 Sept 25    
William Todd
35
" Methodist Stonecutter Oct 08 Remaining in Hosp.  
John Randall
22
" Eng. Church Labourer Nov 13 "  
Maria Maghew
24
" "   Nov 13 Dec 22    
George Banbury
40
" " Coachman Dec 02     Dec 03
Rt. Buchanan
32
Scotland Presbyterian Butcher Dec 19 Remaining in Hosp.  
Mrs. Forbes
34
" "   July 09 Aug 09    

41 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 9.) A. 1878

(Quebec report)

It has been already explained that the immigrants who enter Canada at the several ports consist of two classes, viz: those who come to settle in the country and those who use the Canadian route as the best to go to the United States. The following table shows the numbers from 1866 to 1877, inclusive:-
Years
Immigrant Passengers for Western States (US)
Immigrant Settlers in Canada
1866
41,704
10,091
1867
47,212
14,666
1868
58,683
12,765
1869
57,202
18,630
1870
44,313
24,706
1871
37,949
27,773
1872
52,608
36,578
1873
49,059
50,050
1874
40,649
39,373
1875
9,214
27,382
1876
10,916
25,633
1877
5,640
27,076

It appears from the above figures, that there was an increase in the total number of settlers in Canada in 1877, as compared with 1876, while there is a very marked decrease of nearly 50 per cent. in the numbers of immigrant passengers for the Western States. It may be remarked here, as in previous reports, that the figures in the foregoing table are taken from the statements of the Dominion agents. They are obtained in circumstances, which render it impossible to vouch for their absolute accuracy, and, therefore, they are given as approximate.

The origins of the immigrants who arrived in the Dominion are only reported at the port of Quebec. They are as follow, from 1870 to 1877, as reported at that port.
 
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
English
20,934
17,915
14,867
18,004
13,298
7,752
4,989
4,616
Irish
2,858
2,980
3,410
4,336
2,650
1,449
808
742
Scotch
3,279
3,426
4,165
4,665
2,562
1,816
1,009
799
German
595
9,300
764
739
462
176
104
84
Scandinavian
16,780
2,999
10,148
6,447
1,407
1,201
1,157
1,004
French & Belgian *
1,366
2,634
1,632
534
289
159
Other Origins
29
400
23
76
20
74
Icelanders **
351
22
1,167
52
Mennonites ***
1,532
3,258
1,358
183
Russians
20
9
Totals
44,475
37,020
37,743
36,901
23,894
16,038
10,901
7,743

      * (see Passenger Lists for French &c. from Havre via Liverpool in 1873)
    ** (Icelanders were transmigrants via Glasgow)
  *** (Mennonites all arrived via Liverpool)

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