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SHIP DESCRIPTIONS - A

A Descriptions AA to AQ | AR to AV

Please note that ships often changed hands and names many times. If an entry is just the name of the vessel followed by a "see..." then that vessel was renamed and you will find the full history under the redirected name.

AACHEN 1895
3,833 gross tons, length 355.3ft x 43.7ft (108.29m x 13.31m), one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 13 knots. Accommodation for 28-2nd and 1,045-3rd class passengers. Built by AG Vulcan, Stettin for North German Lloyd, Bremen, she was launched on 5th Apr.1895 and started her maiden voyage from Bremen for Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 15th June 1895. On 12th Jan.1896 she started her first Bremen - New York voyage and on 9th Nov.1896 made her first Bremen - Baltimore sailing. Her 12th and last North Atlantic sailing started on 17th Jun.1897 when she sailed from Bremen for Baltimore and she then transferred back to South America sailings in Aug.1897. In 1900-1901 she was used as a military transport to China during the Boxer Rebellion, also in 1904 during an uprising in German Southwest Africa, but otherwise continued on the South America route until 1914. Transferred to the German Navy, she was sunk by the British submarine E-1 at position 57.31N 19.18E while operating as minesweeper SPERRBRECHER 10 between Libau and Gotland. There were five deaths.[South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2] [Norddeutscher Lloyd, Bremen by Edwin Drechsel]

ABA / GLENAPP / MATRONA 1918
The ABA was a 7,937 gross ton passenger ship, 450ft x 55.8ft, twin screw motor ship, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 225-1st, 70-2nd and 70-3rd class passengers. Laid down in 1916 by Barclay, Curle & Co., Glasgow for the Imperial Russian Government, work was suspended when the October Revolution occurred and she was taken over by the Shipping Controller. Completed Sep.1918 as a funnelless, four masted cargo ship and named GLENAPP for the Glen Line (McGregor, Gow & Holland). 1920 purchased by the British & African Steam Nav. Co. (Elder Dempster & Co.), she was rebuilt with one funnel, fitted with passenger accommodation and renamed ABA. In Nov.1921 she commenced Liverpool - West Africa sailings. Dec.1929 damaged in heavy weather off Kinsale and towed to Queenstown after her steering gear failed. Jun.1931 grounded at Lagos but refloated and Nov.1931 laid up at Dartmouth. Apr.1933 back in service for Elder Lines Ltd and in Sep.1939 was requisitioned by the Admiralty and converted to a Naval Hospital Ship. Mar.1940 transferred to the Army and took part in the evacuation from Norway and was then transferred to Alexandria. May 1941 bombed and damaged off Crete and then used variously on Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East - South Africa services. Mar.1944 clearly marked as a hospital ship, she was again bombed at Naples. After repair, she was used on the North Atlantic and after D-Day was used on the Southampton - Cherbourg service. Decommissioned in Jan.1947 and returned to Elder Dempster & Co., she was too old to be worth reconditioning and was sold to Bawtry SS Co., Liverpool and renamed MATRONA for conversion to an emigrant carrier. However, when her ballast was removed, she fell onto her side in Bidston Dock Eventually righted in Jun.1948 by seven locomotives on specially built tracks, she was towed to Barrow-In-Furness where she was scrapped. [Merchant Fleets, vol.20 by Duncan Haws]

ABBOTSFORD 1873
2,554 gross tons, length 345ft x beam 37.3ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots, accommodation for 20-1st and 500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29th Mar.1873 by Gourlay & Co, Dundee, she was immediately chartered to the Red Star Line and commenced her maiden voyage on 10th May 1873 from Liverpool to Queenstown and Philadelphia. After seven round voyages, she was chartered to the American Line and on 11th Mar.1874 continued on the same service. She was wrecked off Anglesey with no loss of life on 19th Jul.1875. [North Atlantic Seaway vol.2,p.850 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

ABERDEEN / HALEP 1881
This was the Aberdeen Line's first steamship. She was 3,616 gross tons, length 362.4ft x beam 44.3ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), single screw, speed 12 knots. There was accommodation for 45-1st and 650-3rd class passengers. Fares were 40 and 14 respectively. Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow and delivered to the Aberdeen Line in Dec.1881, she started her maiden voyage to Cape Town, Melbourne and Sydney on 30th Mar.1882 and reached Melbourne in 42 days. Modernised in 1892 and sails on foremast only. 1895-96 fitted with electric light and refrigerating machinery. 19th Dec.1905 last sailing to Sydney. 1906 sold to the Turkish Government, renamed HALEP and used for trooping and latterly as a Black Sea ferry. Aug.1915 torpedoed by the British submarine E.11 in the Sea of Marmora and beached. Later refloated but broken up due to her age.[Merchant Fleets, vol.17 by Duncan Haws]

ABYSSINIA 1870
The ABYSSINIA was built by J&G.Thomson, Glasgow for the British and North American Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. (later Cunard Steam Ship Co). She was a 3,376 gross ton ship, length 363.5ft x beam 42.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Launched on 3rd Mar.1870, she started her maiden voyage on 24th May 1870 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She started her last voyage on this service on 18th Sep.1880 and was returned to the builders in part payment for the new ships SERVIA and CATALONIA. Sold to the Guion Line, she commenced Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailings on 20th Nov.1880 and in 1882 was fitted with compound engines. Her last voyage on this route started 27th Mar.1886 and between 1887 - 1891 she ran on the Pacific for Canadian Pacific Line. Resumed Liverpool - Queenstown - New York route on 28th Nov.1891 and on 13th Dec.1891, left New York for Liverpool, but was destroyed at sea by fire on 18th Dec. All the passengers and crew were rescued by the German liner SPREE. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.151]

ACADIA 1840 / ERZHERZOG JOHANN 1849 / GERMANIA 1852
1154 gross tons, length 207ft x beam 34ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, rigged for sail, wooden hull, side paddle wheel propulsion, speed 9 knots. Accommodation for 115-1st class passengers. Built by John Wood, Port Glasgow (engines by Robert Napier, Glasgow) and launched in April 1840 for Cunard. Maiden voyage 4th Aug.1840 Liverpool - Halifax - Boston. 33rd and last voyage on this route 4th Nov.1848. Sold to Germany in 1849 and renamed ERZHERZOG JOHANN, 1852 sold to Fritz and Lehmkuhl, renamed GERMANIA and made four Bremen - New York voyages in 1853-54, 1855 chartered to British Government as Crimea War transport, 1858 scrapped London.

ACCRA 1926
9,337 gross ton passenger ship, length 451ft x beam 62.3ft, twin screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 243-1st and 70-2nd class passengers. Crew 130. Launched 18th Mar.1926 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for Elder Dempster & Co., she entered the Liverpool - West Africa sevice in Sep.1926. On 26th Jul.1940 she was torpedoed by U.34 (Rollman) in the Atlantic 320 miles West of Bloody Foreland in position 55.40N 16.28W on voyage Liverpool to Freetown and West African ports with 323 passengers and 1,700 tons of general cargo, part of convoy OB 188. The Master, Capt. J. J. Smith, 153 crew and 311 passengers were rescued by the British ship HOLLINSIDE, Norwegian ship LOKE and HMS ENCHANTRESS and HMS CLARKIA. 12 crew and 12 passengers were lost when their lifeboat capsized. The ACCRA sank in 1hour 15 minutes. [British & Commonwealth Merchant Ship Losses to Axis Submarines 1939-1945 by A. J. Tennent] [Merchant Fleets, vol.20 by Duncan Haws]

ACONCAGUA 1872 / EGYPTE 1895
This was the ACONCAGUA which belonged to Pacific Steam Navigation Co but between 1878 - 1881 was used as a stand by vessel under Orient SN Co management for the joint Orient-Pacific service to Australia. She was a 4,105 gross ton ship, length 404.8ft x beam 41.4ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st, 90-2nd and 335-3rd class passengers. Built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow, she was launched on 6th June 1872 and started her maiden voyage on 28th Sep.1872 when she left Liverpool for Valparaiso via Cape Horn. Chartered by the Orient Line for their London - Australia service in 1878 and returned to the Valparaiso route in 1881. Sold to Verdeau & Cie, Bordeaux in 1895, renamed EGYPTE and used on the Eastern Mediterranean route, she was scrapped in 1896. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O, Orient and Blue Funnel Lines, vol.8, Pacific Steam Nav. Co] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

ADA 1911 see AMALFI 1881

ADALIA 1864
The ADALIA was built by Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland in 1864. She was a 1,270 gross ton vessel, length 232ft x beam 32ft, iron construction and a speed of 9 knots. Launched in 1864, she was chartered to the Liverpool and Charleston Steamship Line and on 29/11/1869 commenced a single round voyage from Liverpool to Charleston. On 24/6/1872 she was wrecked on St Paul Island, Cape Breton. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.728]

ADDA 1922
O.N.146664. 7,816 gross tons, length 435ft x beam 57.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots. Laid down by Harland & Wolff, Greenock as the ANCOBRA, but launched and completed in Nov.1922 for African Steamship Co. (Elder, Dempster & Co.), Liverpool as the ADDA for the Liverpool - West Africa service. Apr.1923 collided with the s/s BATA in the River Mersey. April 1933 transferred to Elder, Dempster Lines Ltd. 8th June 1941 torpedoed and sunk by U.107 (Hessler) in position 08.30N 14.39W on voyage Liverpool to West Africa with 490 passengers and crew. Ten crew and two passengers were lost.

ADDERSTONE 1933 / WAR BAMBOO / BOSWELL 1920 / GEMA 1937 / NORWAY MARU 1951
was a 5327 gross ton ship, length 400ft x beam 52.4ft, single screw, speed 10 knots. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast as a wartime standard type ship, she was launched on 1st Jul.1920 as the WAR BAMBOO, but was completed as the BOSWELL for Lamport & Holt. In 1933 she was sold to the White SS Co, a new company set up to try out an experimental economy engine, and renamed ADDERSTONE. In Apr.1937 she was sold to Johan Gerrard, Kristiansand, Norway and renamed GEMA, and in 1950 was sold to Wallem & Co, Hong Kong. In 1951 she went to Daiichi Kabusiki Kaisya (First Shipping Co), Kobe and was named NORWAY MARU. Fitted with diesel engines in 1958 by Niigata Eng.Co, Niigata, Japan, she was eventually scrapped at Sakai in 1968. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.34, Lamport & Holt]

ADELAIDE STAR 1950
12,964 gros tons, length 573.8ft x beam 72.7ft, one funnel, one mast, twin screw, speed 18 knots, accommodation for 12 passengers. Refrigerated cargo space and equipped to carry motor cars in the 'tween decks. Launched on 2nd Aug.1950 by John Brown & Co., Clydebank for Blue Star Line, she was the largest refrigerated ship in the world at the time. In 1964 ownership was transferred to Lamport & Holt Line, but she continued on bare boat charter to Blue Star. 1965 ownership reverted to Blue Star Line. 8th Mar.1975 en route Timaru to Liverpool, she sustained severe damage to the engines and was found uneconomical to repair. On 25th April she left Liverpool for Masan, Korea at the lowest economical speed and with a crew of 34 as opposed to a normal crew of 69. She was there scrapped by Hankook Steel.

ADEN 1891
O.N.98775 3,925 g.t., 366ft x 46.1ft x 27.6ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), single screw, triple expansion 3-cylinder engine manufactured by T. Richardson & Sons, Hartlepool. 3000 i.h.p, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 36-1st class passengers. Launched 5th Oct.1891 by Raylton, Dixon & Co, Middlesbrough (Yard No.340), but sustained damage during launching and not completed until 4th Feb.1892. [Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co. (P&O)] 9th Jun.1897 on voyage Yokohama - London she laid off at the eastern end of the island of Socotra in order to work her deck cargo of coal down into the bunkers. Drifted and struck rocks 1 mile Northeast of Ras Radressa and engine room flooded and power cut off. A number of lifeboats were smashed and those which were launched were soon swamped. A total of 78 passengers and crew were lost, but the remaining 46 were eventually rescued by the Indian Marine steamer MAYO. ["P & O, A Fleet History" by Rabson & O'Donoghue]

ADMIRAL 1905
6,341 gross tons, length 126.8m x beam 15.2m, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 72-1st, 112-2nd and 80-3rd class passengers.
Built 1905 by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg for the Deutsche Ost-Afrika Line, she commenced Hamburg - Round Africa voyages on 25th June 1905. In Aug.1914 she was laid up at Lourenco Marques on the outbreak of war and on 23rd Feb.1916 was seized by Portuguese authorities and renamed LOURENCO MARQUES. Managed by Transportes Maritimos do Estado, Lisbon until 1925 when she transferred to Cia Nacional de Navegaceo, Lisbon. Used on the Portugal - Mozambique service. 1950 scrapped at Faslane. (picture)

ADRIA ex ETNA / CITY OF BRISTOL / MEXICO / MESSICO / SEMPIONE 1854
2,215 gross tons, length 305ft x beam 37.6ft (92.96m x 11.46m), clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots, accommodation for 120-1st and 400-3rd class passengers. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock, she was launched for the Cunard Line on 26th Aug.1854 as the ETNA. Used firstly as a Crimea War transport. On 5th Feb.1856 she sailed from Havre to New York, then from Liverpool to New York and also used on the New York - Chagres route. In 1857 she sailed for the European & Australian R.M.S.P.Co on the Southampton - Malta - Alexandria route and in 1860 was sold to the Inman Line. 1871 rebuilt to 2,655 gross tons and lengthened to 349ft (106.38m) and re-engined to give a speed of 12 knots, she was then renamed CITY OF BRISTOL and used on the Liverpool - New York service. 1881 sold to Spain renamed MEXICO, 1882 sold to Italy renamed MESSICO, 1883 renamed SEMPIONE, 1884 sold to Societa Rocco Piaggio & Figli, Genoa and renamed ADRIA. 1st June 1884 first voyage Genoa - Montevideo - Buenos Aires. In 1885 the company was taken over by Navigazione Generale Italiana and the ship continued South America sailings until 1896 when she was scrapped in Italy. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

ADRIA 1896 / NARVA 1905 / KHAZAN 1906
The ADRIA was built in 1896 by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 5,458 gross ton ship, length 399.3ft x beam 50.1ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 20-1st and 1,100-3rd class. Launched on 27th May 1896, she sailed from Hamburg on 19th Aug.1896 on her maiden voyage to Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore. On 8th Dec.1898 she started the first of two Antwerp - New York voyages under charter to Red Star Line and commenced the second one on 19th Jan.1899. She then returned to Hamburg - US voyages until 4th Apr.1904 when she started Stettin - Helsingborg - Gothenberg - New York sailings. She made four voyages on this service, and started her last sailing for Hamburg America Line when she left Hamburg on 22nd Nov.1904 for Boston and Baltimore. In 1905 she was sold to the Russian Navy and renamed NARVA and in 1906 she went to the Russian Volunteer Fleet and was renamed KHAZAN. On 19th Apr.1906 she went aground near Colombo, Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and was wrecked. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.402]

ADRIATIC 1871
was a 3888 gross ton ship, length 437.2ft x beam 40.9ft, one funnel, four masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. Accommodation for 166-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast (engines by Maudslay, Sons & Field, London), she was launched for the White Star Line on 17th Oct.1871. On 11th Apr.1872 she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York and in May 1872 made a record passage from Queenstown to Sandy Hook of 7 days 23 hrs 17 mins at an average speed of 14.53 knots. Refitted in 1884 to carry additional 2nd class passengers, she started her last Liverpool - Queenstown - New York voyage on 17th Nov.1897 and was scrapped at Preston in 1899.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.756]

ADRIATIC 1906
The ADRIATIC was a 24,541 gross ton ship, length 709.2ft x beam 75.5ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. Accommodation for 425-1st, 500-2nd and 2,000-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched for the White Star Line on 20th Sep.1906 and left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to New York on 8th May 1907.  On 22nd May 1907 she sailed from New York for Plymouth, Cherbourg and Southampton and on 5th Jun.1907 she started Southampton - Cherbourg - Queenstown (Cobh) - New York sailings. Her last voyage on this route started on 26th Jul.1911 and she then resumed Liverpool - New York voyages. Refitted in 1919 to carry 400-1st, 465-2nd and 1,300-3rd class passengers, she resumed Southampton - New York sailings on 3rd Sep.1919. Transferred to the Liverpool - New York route on 13th May 1922 and in 1928 was again refitted to carry 506-cabin, 560-tourist and 404-3rd class passengers. Her last Liverpool - New York sailing started on 25th Feb.1933 and after a period spent cruising, she was laid up at Liverpool. In 1934 the White Star Line and Cunard merged to become the Cunard-White Star Line and the ADRIATIC started a single round voyage on 24th Feb.1934 from Liverpool to Cobh, Halifax, Boston, New York, Boston, Halifax, Galway, Cobh and Liverpool. Subsequently used for cruising, she sailed from Liverpool on 19th Dec.1934 for Osaka where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.763-4]

AFRIC 1899
The AFRIC was a 11,948 gross ton ship, built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the White Star Line's Australian trade in 1899. She had one funnel, four masts, refrigerated cargo space for the carriage of frozen meat, twin screws and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 350 single-class passengers. She commenced her maiden voyage on 8th Feb.1899 when she left Liverpool on a trial run to New York, after which she returned to Belfast for some months to allow alterations to be carried out. On 9th Sept.1899 she sailed from Liverpool for Capetown, Albany, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney. She continued on the Australia service until 12th Feb.1917 when she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine off the Eddystone Rock, English Channel. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

AFRICA 1850
2226 gross tons, length 266ft x beam 40ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, rigged for sail, wooden hull, side paddle wheels, speed 12 knots. Accommodation for 130-1st and 30-2nd class passengers. Built by R. Steele & Co, Greenock (engines by Robert Napier, Glasgow), and launched for Cunard in July 1850. Maiden voyage 26th Oct.1850 Liverpool - New York. 25.10.1851 stranded off Belfast, returned to Liverpool. 1853 mizzen (third) mast removed. 16.2.1854 stranded near Jersey City, refloated. 20.7.1855 first voyage Liverpool - Halifax - Boston. 9.1.1856 resumed Liverpool - New York. 31.5.1862 resumed Liverpool - Halifax - Boston. 7.12.1867 last voyage. 1868 sold.

AFRICAN 1855 / CITY OF LIMERICK 1863
The "City of Limerick" was built in 1855 by Smith & Rodger, Glasgow for British owners, as the "African". She was purchased by the Inman Line of Liverpool in 1863 and renamed "City of Limerick". Her details were - 1,529 gross tons, length 281ft x beam 34.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. She started her first voyage for the Inman Line on 29/5/1863 when she sailed from Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. In 1870 she was rebuilt to 2,536 gross tons, lengthened to 331.1ft and fitted with compound engines by G.Forrester & Co, Liverpool. She started her last Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailing on 20/5/1874 and was chartered to the American Line for their Liverpool - Philadelphia service in July 1875. She made her sixth and last voyage on this route in August 1876 and then made a single round voyage in November 1876 for the Inman Line between Bordeaux and New York. Again chartered to the American Line, she resumed Liverpool - Philadelphia sailings in January 1877, making her fifth and last voyage on this service in May 1878. She resumed Liverpool - New York voyages for Inman on 3/7/1878 for three round voyages, the last commencing on 25/10/1879 and was then sold to the Thistle Line of London. She started her first London - New York voyage on 26/3/1880 and left London on her last round voyage on 5/12/1881. Sailed from New York on the homeward passage on 8/1/1882 and went missing with the loss of 43 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.240-1]

AFRICAN 1873 see additional information & picture
Off. No.68814, 2,019 gross tons, length 315.7ft x beam 34.3ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots, accommodation for 60-1st and 80-2nd class passengers. Launched 31st Dec.1872 by John Key & Son, Kinghorn, Fife (Yard No.15) for the Union SS Co., UK - South Africa passenger and mail service, she was towed to Leith for completion. Delivered on Mar.4th 1873, she arrived at Cape Town on her maiden voyage on Apr.3rd. In Jan.1879 after the Zulu victory at Isandlwana she carried troop reinforcements from Cape Town to Durban. Late 1881 transferred to South African coastal service. Nov.1883 sold to J. Japp, Liverpool and J. M. Kirby, London. 15th Feb.1887 ran aground on Abu Madaff reef, north of Jeddah in the Red Sea while on voyage Cardiff to Jeddah with a cargo of coal. 26th Feb. broke in two and became total loss. [Union-Castle Line by Peter Newall ISBN 0-953429-14-8 contains photo of a painting of the ship]

AFRICAN STAR 1946
7,971 gross tons, 469ft x 69.6ft, speed 16 knots, accommodation for 12 passengers, built 1946 by Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Kearney, NJ for American South African Line, New York. On 18th Mar.1968 she suffered extensive damage on voyage New Orleans to Auckland when she collided with the tug MIDWEST CITIES in the Mississippi. The AFRICAN STAR was beached at Diamond, La. and was refloated on 22nd Mar.and towed to New Orleans and then to Galveston to discharge her cargo. Repaired at Tampa and resumed service until 1973 when she was renamed STAR and was scrapped at Taiwan the same year.

AGENORIA 1857
279 gross tons, length 148.5ft x beam 22.2ft, iron hull, built 1857 at Monk's Ferry, Birkenhead and registered 21st Mar.1858 for John Jones, Birkenhead. 22nd Mar.1858 sold to Sir S. M. Peto, Thomas Brassey, Liverpool and E. L. Betts, London. 3rd Apr.1862 registered as owned by Samuel Holme, Liverpool. 5th Dec.1863 sold to Bailey and Leetham Ltd, Hull. 13th Feb.1864 wrecked on the Swedish coast.

AGUILA 1917
3,255 gross tons, 315.3ft x 44.2ft, 150-1st class passengers. Built 1917 by Caledon Shipbuilding Co, Dundee for Yeoward Line Ltd, Liverpool who operated services to Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Las Palmas and Tenerife. 19.8.41 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U.201 (Schnee) in the Atlantic WSW of Fastnet Rock at position 49.23N 17.56W while en route Liverpool to Gibraltar and Lisbon with 91 passengers and a general cargo, including mail, part of convoy OG71, comprising 21 ships. The Master, Captain Arthur Firth, 6 crew, 1 naval staff and 2 passengers were rescued by HMS WALLFLOWER and landed at Gibraltar. 6 crew rescued by the tug ROYAL OAK were later lost when she was sunk on 22.8.41 by U.564. The convoy commodore, Vice Admiral P. E. Parker DSO RN, 58 crew, 5 gunners, 4 naval staff and 89 passengers were lost.

AKI MARU 1903
The AKI MARU was a 6023 gross ton ship, length 445ft x beam 49ft, twin screw, speed 14 knots. Built by Mitsubishi Dockyard, she was delivered on 13th Feb.1903 and was used mostly on the Hong Kong, Japan - Seattle service. She served as a troopship 1904-1905 and was later transferred to the Australia service. Diverted to wartime service 1917-1922, laid up 1930, scrapped 1934. [Pacific Liners by Frederick Emmons]

ALAMEDA 1883
3,000 gross tons, iron hulled steamship, built 1883 in Philadelphia for the Oceanic Steamship Co. and made her maiden voyage in Oct.1883 between San Francisco and Honolulu. In 1885 she was used on the San Francisco to Hawaii and Sydney service and in 1890 was put on the S.F to New Zealand via Hawaii route. In 1901 with the advent of new ships, she was switched back to the San Francisco - Hawaii service. Laid up in 1907 when the U.S. Government terminated Oceanic's mail contract to the South Pacific and they were left with redundant ships, she was eventually sold to Alaska SS Co in 1910 and placed on the Seattle - Alaska route. On 28th Nov.1931 she was burnt out at Seattle Pier.[Cargoes, Matson's First Century in the Pacific by W. L. Worden]

ALASKA 1881 / MAGALLANES 1897
6,932 gross tons, length 500ft x beam 50ft, two funnels, four masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 16 knots. Built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow, she was launched for the Guion Line of Liverpool on 15th July 1881. Her maiden voyage started on 30th Oct.1881 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She made record passages, the fastest being 6days 18hrs 37mins between Sandy Hook and Queenstown in Sep.1882. Her last Liverpool - Queenstown - New York voyage started on 28th Apr.1894 and she was then laid up in Gareloch until 1897. Chartered to Cia Trasatlantica of Spain and renamed MAGALLANES until 1898 when she was again laid up in the Clyde. Sold for scrap in 1899, but resold and used as an accommodation ship at Barrow until 1902 when she was scrapped at Preston. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.710]

ALAUNIA 1913
13,405 gross tons, length 520.3ft x beam 64ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 520-2nd and 1,540-3rd class passengers. Launched on 9th Jun.1913 by Scott's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co, Greenock for the Cunard Steamship Co, her maiden voyage started 27th Nov.1913 from Liverpool for Queenstown, Portland and Boston (4 round voyages). 9th Apr.1914 first voyage (London for cargo) - Southampton - Portland. 14th May 1914 first voyage (London) - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal. 10th May 1916 first voyage London - New York. 19th Sep.1916 last voyage London - NY. 19th Oct.1916 mined and sunk off Royal Sovereign lightship, Sussex with the loss of two lives.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.159]

ALAUNIA 1925
14,040 gross tons, length 520ft x beam 65.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 500-cabin and 1,200-3rd class passengers.
Built 1925 by John Brown & Co., Glasgow, she was launched on 7th Feb.1925 for the Cunard SS Co. Maiden voyage started 24th Jul.1925 from Liverpool for Quebec and Montreal. On 28th May 1926 she started her first voyage London - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal and started her last voyage on this service on 29th Jul.1939. She was then requisitioned by the Admiralty and converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser. Dec.1944 sold to the Admiralty and converted to a Fleet Repair Ship. 1957 scrapped at Blyth.

ALBAN 1914
5,223 gross tons, 375.2ft x 51.7ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 13 knots, built 1914 by Caledon SB & Eng, Co., Dundee for the Booth Steamship Co., On 13th Nov.1914 she started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York and the River Amazon and continued on this service. May 1935 sold to shipbreakers at Genoa but in 1936 was resold to Ugo Musso, Genoa for further trading and renamed ZENA. On 11th Oct.1941 she was torpedoed and sunk by British aircraft about 42 miles south from Lampedusa Island on voyage Naples to Tripoli.

ALBANO / IRAN / BRETON 1886
3,747 gross tons, length 380.3ft x beam 43ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 11 knots, accommodation for 780-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched as the IRAN for E. Bates & Co on 5th Jan.1886. Purchased by Sloman of Hamburg in 1895, she was renamed ALBANO and started her first Hamburg - New York sailing on 19th Apr.1895. In May 1903 she was chartered to the Hamburg America Line who used her on the same service and who purchased her on 9th Jan.1907. Her last Hamburg - New York sailing took place in March 1911 and her first Hamburg - New Orleans voyage commenced 25th May 1911. Sold to Messageries Maritimes, France the same year, she was renamed BRETON. On 8th Aug.1917 she was mined off Tunisia. Taken in tow by a French Armed Trawler but fire broke out and she sank about 2 hours later. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.408] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

ALBERT BALLIN / HANSA / SOVETSKY SOJUS 1922
The ALBERT BALLIN was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1922 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 20,815 gross ton ship, length 602.4ft x beam 78.7ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation was provided for 250-1st, 340-2nd and 1,060-3rd class passengers. Launched on 16/12/1922, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 5/7/1923. In Feb.1928 she was refitted to carry 1st, 2nd, tourist and 3rd class passengers and on 11/9/1929 commenced her last Hamburg to Boulogne, Southampton and New York voyage before being re-engined to give a speed of 19 knots. On 21/3/1930 she resumed the Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York service, carrying 1st, tourist and 3rd class. On 21/12/1933 she commenced her last voyage on this route and on 12/5/1934 she rammed and sank the North German Lloyd vessel MERKUR with the loss of 7 lives. Later the same year she was rebuilt to 21,131 tons, length 645.8ft,speed 20 knots and renamed HANSA under the direction of the Nazi government.(Albert Ballin was Jewish.) On 31/10/1935 she resumed the Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York run and in March 1936 was refitted to carry cabin, tourist and 3rd class. She commenced her last New York voyage on 27/7/1939 and then became a naval accommodation ship at Gotenhafen. On 6/3/1945 she was sunk by a mine off Warnemunde, initially taken in tow, but failed to reach port. In 1949 she was raised by the Russians, rebuilt at Warnemunde and Antwerp to 23,009 tons and one funnel and in 1953(?) renamed SOVETSKY SOJUS. She was damaged by fire prior to her entry into service but was repaired and used on the Vladivostok - Kamchatka route. Still in service in 1979. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.417] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

ALBERTIC see OHIO 1923

ALBION 1861 / ALBANO 1880
The ALBION (O.N 29316) was a 900 gross ton ship, length 245.2ft x beam 29ft, iron hull, clipper bows. There was accommodation for 24-1st, 16-2nd and 365-steerage class passengers. Launched by Martin Samuelson, Hull on speculation in Feb.1861, she was sold to J.W.Day, Durham on 24th Jun.1861 and resold to Thos.Wilson, Sons & Co, Hull on 17th Oct.1861. Re-engined in 1880, she was renamed ALBANO and in Jan.1887 she lost her rudder 500 miles west of Queenstown and was assisted into that port by Bristol City Line's WELLS CITY by steaming ahead with the WELLS CITY steering her from astern. In Nov.1896 she was sold to the Marine Association (O.S.S.Piper, manager), Port Talbot and on 26th Sep.1897 was wrecked in the Gulf of Bothnia near Kemi, Finland while on passage Trelleborg to Neder Kalix in ballast. [Wilson Line by John Harrower]

ALCANTARA / KAISHO MARU 1926
22,181 gross tons, length 630.5ft x beam 78.5ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation for 432-1st, 200-2nd and 674-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched for Royal Mail Lines on 23rd Sep.1926. Her maiden voyage started on 4th Mar.1927 when she left Southampton for Cherbourg, Lisbon, Las Palmas, Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires. She continued this service, with the occasional cruise until 1934 when she was rebuilt to 22,209 gross tons, with accommodation for 330-1st, 220-2nd and 768-3rd class passengers. She was also lengthened to 666ft, her two funnels heightened and she was fitted with new diesel engines to give her a speed of 18 knots. She resumed the same service on 4th May 1935 and continued until 1939 when she was rebuilt as an Armed Merchant Cruiser. Her forward (dummy) funnel and mainmast were removed at this time. Sent to Malta for further conversion, she was involved in a serious collision with the Cunard ship FRANCONIA en route, but remained afloat and managed to reach Alexandria for major hull repairs. In December 1939 she commenced South Atlantic patrol work. In July 1940 she was engaged in a battle with the German surface raider THOR and scored a number of hits, but was damaged on the waterline by an unexploded shell and had to reduce speed. The THOR withdrew under cover of a smokescreen and the ALCANTARA put into Rio for temporary repairs. In Nov.1940 she returned to Liverpool where she was fitted with better armament and then returned to South Atlantic patrol work. Converted to a troopship in 1943, she made trooping voyages to the Mediterranean, Singapore, East Indies, Halifax, India and Ceylon. Refitted after the war to carry 220-1st, 185-cabin and 462-tourist class passengers, she resumed the Southampton - Buenos Aires service on 8th Oct.1948. On 17th Apr.1958 she left Southampton on her last voyage to Buenos Aires having made 172 round voyages to South America. Sold to Japanese shipbreakers, she was renamed KAISHO MARU for her passage to Japan for scrapping and arrived at Osaka on 30th Sep.1958.

ALCANTARA 1913
This was probably the short lived ALCANTARA. 16,034 gross tons, length 590ft x beam 65.4ft, one funnel, two masts, triple screw, speed 17 knots, accommodation for 400-1st, 230-2nd and 760-3rd class passengers. Fitted with refrigerated cargo space for the Argentine meat trade. Built by Harland & Wolff, Glasgow, she was launched on 30th Oct.1913 for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co and started her maiden voyage from Southampton to Buenos Aires on 19th June 1914. Converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser in 1915 with 8 x 6in guns and 2 x 6 pounders. On 29th Feb.1916 in the Skaggerak, she, together with her sister ship ANDES, intercepted a merchant ship disguised as the Norwegian RENA. The ship disclosed herself as the German raider GREIF and opened fire, causing great damage to ALCANTARA which developed a heavy list. GREIF was also on fire and ALCANTARA was abandoned and later sank. British warships arrived on the scene and, together with the ANDES sank the GREIF and picked up survivors. ALCANTARA lost 72 men and GREIF lost 280.[South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

ALCANTARA 1927
22,181 gross tons, length 630.5ft x beam 78.5ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation for 432-1st, 200-2nd and 674-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched for Royal Mail Lines on 23rd Sep.1926. Her maiden voyage started on 4th Mar.1927 when she left Southampton for Cherbourg, Lisbon, Las Palmas, Rio de Janeiro and Buenos Aires. She continued this service, with the occasional cruise until 1934 when she was rebuilt to 22,209 gross tons, with accommodation for 330-1st, 220-2nd and 768-3rd class passengers. She was also lengthened to 666ft, her two funnels heightened and she was fitted with new diesel engines to give her a speed of 18 knots. She resumed the same service on 4th May 1935 and continued until 1939 when she was rebuilt as an Armed Merchant Cruiser. Her forward (dummy) funnel and mainmast were removed at this time. Sent to Malta for further conversion, she was involved in a serious collision with the Cunard ship FRANCONIA en route, but remained afloat and managed to reach Alexandria for major hull repairs. In December 1939 she commenced South Atlantic patrol work. In July 1940 she was engaged in a battle with the German surface raider THOR and scored a number of hits, but was damaged on the waterline by an unexploded shell and had to reduce speed. The THOR withdrew under cover of a smokescreen and the ALCANTARA put into Rio for temporary repairs. In Nov.1940 she returned to Liverpool where she was fitted with better armament and then returned to South Atlantic patrol work. Converted to a troopship in 1943, she made trooping voyages to the Mediterranean, Singapore, East Indies, Halifax, India and Ceylon. Refitted after the war to carry 220-1st, 185-cabin and 462-tourist class passengers, she resumed the Southampton - Buenos Aires service on 8th Oct.1948. On 17th Apr.1958 she left Southampton on her last voyage to Buenos Aires having made 172 round voyages to South America. Sold to Japanese shipbreakers, she was renamed KAISHO MARU for her passage to Japan for scrapping and arrived at Osaka on 30th Sep.1958.

ALDENHAM / NINEVAH / LARNE 1894
3,808 gross ton passenger ship, 365ft x 45.1ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, single screw, speed 13 knots. Built 1894 with accommodation for 45-1st and 650-3rd class passengers by R. Napier & Sons, Glasgow as the NINEVEH for G. Thompson & Co. (Aberdeen Line), Aberdeen, she was used on the London - Australia service. 1907 sold to Eastern & Australian SS Co., London renamed ALDENHAM and operated Melbourne, Brisbane, Manila, Hong Kong, Japan route, 1916 sold to Royal Mail Steam Packet Co., London renamed LARNE, 1918 sold to Zurbaran SS Co. (MacAndrews & Co.), London, 1923 scrapped.

ALEPPO 1864
Built by J.& G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1864 for the Cunard Mediterranean service. 2,057 gross tons, length 292.5ft x beam 38.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Accommodation for 46-1st and 593-3rd class passengers. Launched on 1st Nov.1864, she started her first transatlantic voyage on 15th Sep.1865 when she sailed from Liverpool for Halifax and New York. Between 1865 - 1871 she made 40 round voyages between Liverpool - Queenstown (Cobh) - New York (many via Boston). Her last Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailing started 9th May 1871 and on 20th Jun.1871 she started the first of four Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston sailings. From 1872 she was mostly employed on the Liverpool - Mediterranean trade but between 1877-92 made at least 16 North Atlantic voyages. In 1880 and again in 1890 she was re-engined and she started her last North Atlantic sailing between Liverpool and Boston on 24th Mar.1892. In 1909 she was scrapped at Preston. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.148]

ALESIA 1882
The ALESIA was a 2,790 gross ton ship built in 1882 by T. Royden & Sons, Liverpool (engines by G. Forrester & Co, Liverpool) for the Fabre Line of Marseilles. Her details were - length 328ft x beam 40.4ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 18-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched in June 1882, she sailed from Marseilles on 15th Oct.1882 on her maiden voyage to Leghorn, Tarragona, Bone, Almeria, Malaga and New York. She continued on the Mediterranean - New York service until commencing her last voyage between Marseilles, Naples and New York on 17th Mar.1899. She was then scrapped.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1132]

ALESIA 1928 see KONIG FRIEDRICH AUGUST 1906

ALEXANDRA 1897 / MENOMINEE 1898
The MENOMINEE was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1897 as the ALEXANDRA for Wilson's and Furness-Leyland. This was a 6,919 gross ton ship, length 475ft x beam 52.3ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st class passengers. She commenced her maiden voyage on 8/10/1897 when she left Glasgow for New York and London and on 12/11/1897 commenced her first London - New York sailing. Her last voyage for this company started on 14/7/1898 from London to New York and she then went to the Atlantic Transport Line. She made one London (dep 18/8/1898)- NY voyage for this company under her old name and was then renamed MENOMINEE. She commenced sailing London - NY on 23/9/1898 and continued on this service until her last voyage started on 16/2/1905. In Sept.1905 she was chartered to Red Star Line and sailed between Antwerp and Philadelphia carrying up to 120-2nd class passengers. She made her last voyage on this service in July 1914 and on 18/8/1914 sailed between Antwerp, London (dep 5/9) and new York. On 28/10/1914 she went back to the London - New York service for ATL for three round voyages, the last starting on 21/1/1915 and then became a British Transport ship. Reconditioned in 1919 she sailed from Live0rpool to New York with cargo only and then returned to the London - New York service. She was scrapped in Italy in 1926. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1091]

ALFONSO XIII 1916 see SCOT 1890

ALGERIA / CYRILL / VIRGINIA 1891
This ship was built by D & W.Henderson Ltd, Glasgow in 1891 for the Anchor Line of Glasgow. She was a 4,510 gross ton ship, length 375ft x beam 46.3ft. one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 26-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Launched on 6/10/1891 for the Indian service, she left Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Liverpool (dep.4/3/1891) and Calcutta. She continued on this service until 1895 when she was transferred on 21/5/1896 to the Naples - Gibraltar - New York route. She completed 2 round voyages on this service and then, from 1896-1901 returned to the Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay or Calcutta run. On 28/2/1902 she commenced her first voyage from Leghorn to Naples and New York and stayed on this service until starting her final voyage on 12/11/1908. (34 round voyages on this route). She was sold to a German company on 12/8/1912 and was renamed CYRILL and in 1914 went to the Italian company, Societa Italiana di Navigazione Lloyd Mediterraneo, who renamed her VIRGINIA. She was finally scrapped in 1923. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.465] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line]

ALGERIA / PENNLAND 1870
The PENNLAND was a 3428 gross ton ship, length 361.2ft x beam 41.4ft, one funnel, three masts, rigged for sail, iron hull, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Accommodation for 200-1st and 1,054-3rd class passengers. Built by J.& G.Thomson, Glasgow, she was launched on 12th Jul.1870 as the ALGERIA for the Cunard SS Co. Her maiden voyage started 27th Sep.1870 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York and her last voyage on this service started 22nd Oct.1881. Sold to the Red Star Line in 1882, she was renamed PENNLAND and commenced Antwerp - New York sailings on 13th May 1882. Rebuilt to 3,760 tons in 1888, she started her last Antwerp - New York voyage on 15th Dec.1894. On 11th Apr.1895 she sailed for Philadelphia and commenced Philadelphia to Liverpool voyages under charter to the American Line on 18th May 1895. Her last sailing on this route started 6th Apr.1901 and she then resumed Antwerp - New York sailings. In Aug.1901 she resumed the Antwerp - Philadelphia route and in 1902 became 3rd class only. Her last Antwerp - New York voyage started 27th Mar.1902 and her last Philadelphia - Antwerp on 23rd Sep.1903. She was then scrapped in Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1]

ALGERIA 1921 see KIGOMA 1914

ALICE 1907 see ASIA 1907

ALLEMANIA / OXENHOLME 1865
The ALLEMANIA was a 2,695 gross ton ship built in 1865 by C.A.Day & Co, Southampton for the Hamburg America Line. Her details were - length 315ft x beam 41ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st, 100-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers.  Launched on 11/5/1865, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 17/9/1865. In 1872 she was fitted with compound engines and commenced her last voyage to New York on 5/10/1872. She was then transferred to the Hamburg - West Indies service until 11/4/1880, when she resumed the Hamburg - New York run. On 5/9/1880 she commenced her last voyage (3 round voyages) and was then sold to the British company, Hunter & Co.who renamed her OXENHOLME. In 1894 she was sold to A.Chapman and on 6/6/1894 was abandoned with no loss of life after striking rocks near Santa Catharina, Brazil.

ALLEMANIA 1881 / MIKADO MARU 1904
1846 gross tons, length 375.8ft x beam 34.4ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Accommodation for 30-1st and 300-3rd class passengers. Built for Hamburg America Line by Dobie & Co, Glasgow (engines by J. Howden & Co, Glasgow), she was launched for the West Indies service on 27th May 1881. However she started her maiden voyage between Hamburg, Havre and New York on 21st Aug.1881 and commenced her fifth and last Hamburg - New York sailing on 22nd Oct.1882 before transferring to the West Indies route. Sold to Japan in 1904, she was renamed MIKADO MARU and was eventually wrecked at Hokkashamoru, Japan on 13th Feb.1937.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.392]

ALLER 1886
The ALLER was 4,966 gross tons, length 438.1ft x beam 47.8ft, two funnels, four masts, single screw and a speed of 17 knots. Accommodation for 150-1st, 90-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by Fairfield Co, Glasgow, she was launched for North German Lloyd on 18th Feb.1886 and started her maiden voyage from Bremen to Southampton and New York on 24th Apr.1886. In 1897 her masts were reduced to two, and she started her last Bremen - New York sailing on 18th Sep.1897. She subsequently sailed Genoa - Naples - New York until starting her final voyage on 6th Nov.1902 and was scrapped in 1904. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2]

ALMANZORA 1915
16,034 gross tons, length 590ft x beam 69.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 400-1st, 230-2nd and 760-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co, she was launched on 19th Nov.1914, but was completed as an Armed Merchant Cruiser for the 10th Cruiser Squadron. Reconditioned to 15,551 tons at Belfast in 1919, she started commercial services from Southampton to the River Plate on 9th Jan.1920. In WWII she was used mostly for trooping duties and in 1945 became a government emigration ship. 1947 laid up at Cowes, Isle of Wight and 1948 scrapped at Blyth. {Merchant Fleets, vol.5 by Duncan Haws.]

ALMORA 1873
The ALMORA was built in 1873 by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton for British India Associated Steamers. She was a 2,608 gross ton ship, length 350.2ft x beam 36.4ft (106,74m x 11,09m), one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 41-1st and 18-2nd class passengers. Launched on 6th Sep.1873, she was placed on the London - Suez - Batavia - Brisbane 'Queensland Royal Mail' service. In 1891 she was transferred to British India Steam Navigation Co, but remained on the same route until 1891 when she transferred to the India service. She was scrapped at Bombay in 1894. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.11, British India S.N.Co]

ALSATIA / MINIEH 1876
The ALSATIA was built in 1876 by D & W.Henderson, Glasgow for the Anchor Line. She was a 2,810 gross ton ship, length 356.7ft x beam 36.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 156-cabin class and 538-steerage passengers. Launched in January 1876 she sailed from Glasgow on 8th Apr.1876 on her maiden voyage to Moville and New York. She started her ninth and last voyage on this route on 10th Mar.1877 and on 16th Jun.1877 commenced London - New York sailings. She made 39 round voyages on this service, the last starting on 8th Mar.1882 and in Nov.1882 sailed from Glasgow for Marseilles, Naples, Palermo and New York. In Nov.1882 she sailed Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay and in Apr.1883 Glasgow - Liverpool - Calcutta. Between 1884-1885 she made four Glasgow - New York sailings and in 1886 was fitted with triple expansion engines and her accommodation refitted to carry 156-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Between 1882-1901 she made 57 Mediterranean - New York voyages, her last starting on 11th May 1901 when she left Kalamata for Patras, Palermo and New York (arr.11/6).On 1st Nov.1901 she was sold to Khedivial Mail and renamed MINIEH and in 1914 was sold to the British Admiralty for use as a blockship. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.460][Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line]

ALSATIAN / EMPRESS OF FRANCE  1913
The first EMPRESS OF FRANCE was built by Wm Beardmore & Co Ltd.,Glasgow in 1913 as the ALSATIAN for the Allan Line. She was an 18,481 gross ton ship, length 571.4ft x beam 72.4ft, two funnels, two masts, four screws and a speed of 18 knots.  She was the first North Atlantic liner with a cruiser stern. There was accommodation for 287-1st, 504-2nd and 848-3rd class passengers. Launched on 22/3/1913 as the ALSATIAN she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to St John NB for the Allan Line on 17/1/1914. On 22/5/1914 she commenced her first Liverpool - Quebec voyage and on 17/7/1914 started her last voyage on this service. On 7/8/1914 she became an Armed Merchant Cruiser and joined the 10th Cruiser Squadron patrolling off the Shetland Islands.  She became flagship for Admiral De Chair and later for Vice Admiral Tucker and was one of the first ships to be fitted with the new wireless direction finding apparatus.  After the squadron was retired in 1917, she was returned to Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, who now managed the combined Allan line and Canadian Pacific fleets. On 28/9/1918 she commenced her first voyage from Liverpool to Canada and after a second voyage on this service, was refitted at Glasgow. She was renamed EMPRESS OF FRANCE on 4/4/1919 and on 26th Sept. that year commenced her first voyage under her new name from Liverpool to Quebec. On 3/5/1922 she commenced sailing between Southampton, Cherbourg and Quebec and on 31/5/1922 between Hamburg, Southampton, Cherbourg and Quebec. In 1924 she was converted from coal to oil fuel, and in July 1926 her accommodation became 1st, 2nd, tourist and 3rd class and was altered again Jan.1927 to 1st, tourist and 3rd class. On 29/9/1927 she started her last Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec voyage and on 8/9/1928, her last Southampton - Cherbourg - Quebec voyage. On 31/10/1928 she left Southampton for Suez, Hong Kong and Vancouver and subsequently sailed on the Pacific until 17/10/1929 when she left Hong Kong for Liverpool. She started her final voyage from Southampton to Cherbourg and Quebec on 2/9/1931 and in Sept. of that year was laid up in the Clyde. She was scrapped at Dalmuir on 20/10/1934. In total, she had made 99 Atlantic voyages, 5 trans-Pacific, and 8 cruises as well as her war service. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1313] [Canadian Pacific - 100 years by George Musk]

ALSTON 1903
3,955 gross tons, cargo steamer built 1903 by J. Priestmen & Co., Sunderland for Webster & Barraclough, West Hartlepool. 1918 sold to Britain SS Co. (Watts, Watts & Co.), London. 1919 sold to Sir William Garthwaite, London. 1921 Marine Navigation Co. of Canada (Wm. Garthwaite), Montreal. 1923 sold to Hamaguchi Kisen Kaisha, Amagasaki, Japan renamed KINOENE MARU. 8th Mar.1927 wrecked at Tongochato, Korea off Mokpo on voyage on voyage Nagoya to Dairen in ballast.

ALTONA 1902
4,352 gross ton passenger / cargo ship, length 375ft x beam 47.9ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 12 knots. Built 1902 by Flensburger Schiffbau Ges., Flensburg for the German Australian Line, Hamburg. She regularly sailed Hamburg - Australia until 21st Aug.1914 when she was seized by the Australian authorities on arrival at Melbourne on the outbreak of the Great War. 1915 operated by the Commonwealth of Australia and renamed CONARGO, she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.96 on 31st Mar.1918 while 12 miles W x N from the Calf of Man, Irish Sea.

AMALFI / ADA 1881
The AMALFI was built by M.Pearse & Co, Stockton in 1881 for the Sloman Line of Hamburg. She was a 2,345 gross ton ship, length 300.5ft x beam 36.1ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 600-3rd class. Launched on 7/5/1881, she sailed on the Hamburg - Australia service until 1886 when she came under the control of the newly formed Union Line. She commenced her first Hamburg - New York voyage on 19/5/1886 and started her last voyage on this service on 27/7/1898. In 1911 she was sold to Swedish owners and renamed ADA. On 9/6/1917 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.61, while 25 miles east of Fair Isle. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1166]

AMARAPOORA / MATURA 1901
4,546 gross tons, length 376.3ft x 48.3ft, single screw, speed 11.5 knots. Accommodation for 64-1st class passengers. Built 1901 by Wm. Denny & Bros, Dumbarton as AMARAPOORA for British & Burmese S. N. Co.(P. Henderson & Co.), Glasgow. 1913 sold to Trinidad Shipping & Trading Co., Ltd, Glasgow, renamed MATURA. 1921 transferred to Bermuda & West Indies S.S.Co. Ltd (Furness, Withy & Co. Ltd), Hamilton, Bermuda. 1933 sold to Archer Coaling Depot, Trinidad, converted to a coaling hulk.

AMARAPOORA / CAPTAIN HOBSON 1920
8,084 gross tons, length 465.8ft x beam 59.3ft, single screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 150-1st class passengers. Built 1920 by Wm. Denny & Bros, Dumbarton for P. Henderson & Co. (British & Burmese Steam Navigation Co.). Used on the Glasgow - Rangoon service. 1939 requisitioned as a hospital ship with 503 beds and operating theatres. As HMHS AMARAPOORA, she was the base hospital ship at Scapa Flow and made trips to Glasgow to carry the sick to local hospitals. In 1940 she was used in the evacuation from Norway. 1942 Sent to Gibraltar in preparation for the invasion of North Africa and made several trips to the UK with wounded. Sep.1943 involved in the Salerno landings and was subject to air attack. Nov.1942 returned to the Clyde for overhaul and fitted with another 100 beds. Jan.1944 Mediterranean hospital ship. Apr.1944 converted on the Tyne into a Far East hospital ship and fitted with air conditioning. Oct.1944 base hospital ship at Trincomalee. Aug.1946 released by the Navy to the Ministry of Transport, managed by P. Henderson and used on various duties including carrying French nationals from Saigon to Toulon, Dutch nationals from Indonesia to Holland, pilgrims from Levant to Jeddah and German prisoners from North Africa to Germany. 1948 converted to an austerity emigrant carrier with capacity for 617 passengers and chartered to the International Refugee Organisation. Carried emigrants Italy - Australia and returned with Dutch nationals from Indonesia. Also acted as a troopship for the British garrisons in Libya.
1951 refitted by Alex Stephens as an assisted emigrant carrier with accommodation for 584 passengers, renamed CAPTAIN HOBSON and used on the Glasgow - Wellington service. 1953 - 1955 employed trooping to Hong Kong and then reverted to the New Zealand service. 1956 used as troopship during the Suez crisis and then returned to NZ service. June 1957 suffered engine breakdown in the Pacific and towed to Auckland by the PORT MACQUARIE. Temporarily repaired, she sailed to the Clyde at reduced speed and was fitted with a new high pressure cylinder. In May 1958 she made her final voyage to Wellington where she was put up for sale. There was no interest in the old ship, so she sailed to Bombay where she was laid up. In Mar.1959 she was scrapped at Osaka. [Merchant Fleets, vol.29 by Duncan Haws]

AMAZON 1851 2,256 gross tons, overall length 316ft x beam 73ft (including paddle boxes), one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), side paddle wheel propulsion. Built by R.& H. Green, Blackwall (engines by Seawall & Capel, Millwall), she was launched on 28th Jun.1851 for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. and was then the largest English-built paddle steamer. On Friday, 2nd Jan.1852 she sailed from Southampton on her maiden voyage, commanded by Captain Symons and with Lieut.Grady as mail agent. She carried 50 passengers, a crew of 109, the mail agent and his servant plus the captain - 162 in total. Her cargo included the mails, 20,000 UKP of specie and coined money, plus 5,000 UKP of mercury for mining in Mexico. By 9pm she was hove to off Portland Bill while water was hosed onto the paddle shafts which were overheating, extra grease was ladled onto the bearings to assist them in running in and settling down. This manoeuvre was repeated twice more. On 4th Jan at 12.45 am, the Second Officer Treweek, on the bridge saw flames coming out of the forward stokehold. At the same time, Fourth Engineer Stone encountered flames coming through the forward boiler casings. He tried to reach the controls to shut off the engines but was driven back by flames. By 12.48 am the amidship section of the ship was a wall of flame and the ship was driving at about 10 knots into a moderate gale. Firefighting made no impression and the ship was clearly doomed. The fifty passengers were assembled right aft. Captain Symons now turned the ship so that the flames were blowing forward, away from the passengers. This move trapped most of the crew in the forward part of the ship and in an area without lifeboats. A few came aft over the paddle boxes but within minutes the heat was too great for this route to be used. The ship was still surging along at about 9 knots - too fast for the boats to be launched. Another problem was now encountered. Each lifeboat nestled in a metal cradle. To launch a lifeboat, it had first to be raised by pulley and then swung out over the side. Passengers had already climbed into the boats and there were insufficient crew to hoist the weight. Chaos reigned as, amidst vast roaring sheets of flame, the struggle to free the boats continued. Worse still, some of the lifeboats swung to and fro with the rolling ship and were stove in by the metal supports. In the end only three lifeboats and a dinghy (with four persons aboard) were safely launched, others were capsized by the speed of the ship. At 4 am, driving rain moderated the wind and the survivors in one of the boats, in case more could be rescued, sailed toward the wallowing wreck whose red-hot funnels glowed in the darkness. They then watched as the AMAZON slid beneath the waves with a hissing roar. At 8 am the British brig MARSDEN, en route from London to Carolina, rescued 21 and returned them to Plymouth. Two more boatloads were taken to Brest in the Dutch galliot GERTRUIDA, 24 in all. Another boat without oars or mast but with 13 survivors was found by the Dutch ketch HELLECHENE. This boat was the last to leave the ship and was assisted by Captain Symons who pushed the lifeboat clear of its supports even though his clothes were on fire. Thus 58 were saved, 36 passengers and 68 crew were lost including all the officers and the two midshipmen.

AMBRIA 1897 / BHANDARA 1896 / PIETRO MARONCELLI 1916
5,463 gross tons, length 404ft x beam 50ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 50-1st and 235-3rd class passengers. Built by Flensburger Schiffbau, Flensburg, she was launched on 4th Jun.1896 as the BHANDARA for the Hamburg-Kalkutta Line. Purchased by Hamburg America Line in 1897 and renamed AMBRIA, she started rhe first of two Stettin - New York voyages on 3rd Jul.1897. On 28th Oct.1897 she commenced a single round voyage between Hamburg and Montreal and on 23rd Dec.1897 transferred to Hamburg - Baltimore sailings. She started her eighth and last voyage on this service on 17th Jan.1899 and then switched to Far East routes. Seized by Italy at Syracuse in 1915 and renamed PIETRO MARONCELLI the following year. On 30th May 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk off Sardinia.[North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.404 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

AMERICA / COALGACONDOR 1847
This was a 1,826 gross ton ship, built in 1847 by R. Steele & Co, Greenock (engines by Robert Napier, Glasgow) for Cunard SS Co. Her details were - length 251ft x beam 38ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), wooden construction, side paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 10 knots. There was capacity for 140-1st class passengers. Launched on 13th May 1847, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage on 15th Apr.1848 for Halifax and New York. On 3rd June 1848 she started her first Liverpool - Halifax - Boston voyage and subsequently sailed to New York or Boston. On 12th Dec.1856 she suffered serious storm damage near Cape Clear and had to put back to Liverpool. Her last Liverpool - Halifax - Boston sailing started on 2nd May 1863 and on 23rd Jul.1863 she started the first of four round voyages between Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal under charter to Allan Line, her last sailing starting on 10th Mar.1864. In 1866 she ran Liverpool - Havre for Cunard Line and in 1866 was converted to a sailing ship and renamed COALGACONDOR. She was scrapped in approx.1875.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.141]

AMERICA / ORAZIO 1862
The AMERICA was a 2752 gross ton ship, length 318ft x beam 40ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sails), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Accommodation for 76-1st, 107-2nd and 480-steerage class passengers. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock, she was launched for North German Lloyd, Bremen in Nov.1862. Her maiden voyage started on 25th May 1863 when she left Bremen for Southampton and New York. In 1871 she was fitted with new engines and on 27th Jan.1894 commenced her last round voyage from Bremen to New York and Baltimore. Sold to Italy in 1894, she was renamed ORAZIO and was scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.545]

AMERICA 1881
The AMERICA of 1881 was built by C.Mitchell & Co, Walker-on-Tyne for the Carr Line of Hamburg. She was a 2,118 gross ton ship, length 298.4ft x beam 36ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 28/6/1881, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg to New York on 1/9/1881. She commenced her third and last voyage when she left Hamburg on 1/1/1882, sailed from New York on 1/2/1882 and went missing with the loss of 34 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1073]

AMERICA 1908
The AMERICA was a 8,996 gross ton ship, length 476.5ft x beam 55.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation for 30-1st, 220-2nd and 2,400-3rd class passengers. Built by Cantieri Navale Riuniti, Muggiano (engines by Wallsend Slipway Co), she was launched for La Veloce on 1st Nov.1908 and was used on their New York service. Purchased by Navigazione Generale Italiana in 1912, she started her first Genoa - Naples - New York - Philadelphia voyage on 23rd Apr.1912. On 24th Dec.1916 she started her 34th and last Genoa - New York sailing until after the war, and resumed on 9th Feb.1919 when she left Genoa for Marseilles and New York. Her last Genoa - Naples - New York voyage commenced 19th Nov.1923 and she then made two Genoa - Naples - Boston sailings in March and April 1924 before transferring to the South American service. Scrapped in 1928. {North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1118]

AMERICA 1917 see AMERIKA 1912

AMERICA / WEST POINT / AUSTRALIS / ITALIS 1939 There is a site on the AMERICA of 1939 under her later name of AUSTRALIS. It gives a detailed history, photos and several links to other sites. The URL is at - http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/australis/

Brief specifications are - 26,454 gross tons, length overall 723ft x beam 93.5ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 22 knots. Accommodation for 516-1st, 371-cabin and 159-tourist class passengers. Built by Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. Launched 31/8/1939, maiden voyage 10/8/1940 New York - Caribbean Cruise. 1941 renamed WEST POINT (US troopship). 1946 renamed AMERICA and sailed New York - Cobh - Southampton - Havre (later Cherbourg). 1964 sold to Chandris Line (Panama) and renamed AUSTRALIS. 1976 transferred to Greek flag. 1978 went to Venture Cruise Line, New York and renamed AMERICA. August 1978 repurchased by Chandris Line, renamed ITALIS. Forward funnel removed. Final details are found at the above URL.

AMERICAN BANKER 1924 see AROSA KULM 1919

AMERICAN SHIPPER / TOURS / VILLE DE MONS 1920
The AMERICAN SHIPPER was a 7,430 gross ton ship, length 436.9ft x beam 58.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 80-tourist class passengers. Built by the American International Shipbuilding Corp., Hog Island, Penn, (engines by General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY), she was launched on 6th Jul.1920 as the U.S Army Transport TOURS. In 1924 she was renamed AMERICAN SHIPPER for the American Merchant Line., fitted for 12-1st class passengers and started her first New York - London voyage on 3rd Apr.1924. In 1926 her passenger accommodation was increased to 80-tourist class and in 1931 she transferred to United States Lines. 4th Nov.1931 first voyage New York - Plymouth - Cherbourg - Hamburg. Oct.1932 last voyage New York - Hamburg - New York and then laid up until 1934. 21st Jul.1934 first voyage New York - Cobh - Liverpool - Manchester. 24th Sep.1939 last voyage New York - Liverpool - Belfast (dep.12th Oct.) - Boston - New York (arr.23rd Oct.). 27th Oct.1939 last voyage New York - London (dep.15th Nov.) - New York (arr.26th Nov.). She was then sold to Societe Maritime Anversoise, France and renamed VILLE DE MONS. On 2nd Sep.1940 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.47 NW of Ireland. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.4,p.1549]

AMERIKA / AMERICA / EDMUND B. ALEXANDER 1912
The AMERIKA of 1912 was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1905 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 22,225 gross ton ship, length 669ft x beam 74.3ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 386-1st, 150-2nd, 222-3rd and 1,750-4th class. She carried a crew of 577. Launched on 20/4/1905, she was the largest ship in the world at the time. On 11/10/1905 she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Dover, Cherbourg and New York. In 1907 she was rebuilt to 22,621 tons and on 4/10/1912 collided with and sank the British submarine B.2 off Dover with the loss of 15 lives. On 9/5/1914 she started her last Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York crossing and on 10/6/1914 she commenced Hamburg - Boulogne - Southampton - Boston sailings. Her last voyage to Boston commenced on 14/7/1914 (arr 24/7/1914) and she remained in Boston until April 1917 when she was seized by the US authorities, renamed AMERICA and was used as an army transport. Between 1917-18 she made 9 trooping voyages to France and on 14/7/1918 collided with and sank the British ship INSTRUCTOR with the loss of 16 lives. On Oct.15th 1918 she sank at Hoboken pier during coaling due to bad trim with the loss of 6 lives, and was refloated on 21/11/1918. She was laid up in September 1919 and on 20/1/1920 she sailed from New York via Panama to Vladivostock (arr 20/4/1920) and embarked 6,500 troops for Trieste via Suez. On 8/9/1920 she arrived in New York with 2,666 emigrants from the Mediterranean. In 1921 she was converted to oil fuel and chartered to US Mail with accommodation for 225-1st, 425-2nd and 1,500-3rd class passengers and on 25/6/1921 commenced sailing between New York, Plymouth, Cherbourg and Bremen and commenced her third and last voyage on this service on 27/8/1921. In late 1921 she went to the United States Line and commenced her first voyage for these owners on 28/9/1921 when she left New York for Plymouth, Cherbourg, Bremen, Southampton, Cherbourg, Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She was reconditioned in June 1923 to 21,114 tons and with passenger accommodation for 692-cabin and 1,056-3rd class. On March 10th 1926 she was gutted by fire while being refitted at Newport News and was rebuilt to 21,329 tons, and with passenger accommodation for 835-cabin, 516-tourist and 3rd class. She resumed New York - Plymouth - Cherbourg - Bremen sailings on 21/3/1928 and on 25/8/1931 commenced her last Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York (arr 4/9/1931) crossing. She was then laid up in the reserve fleet at Chesapeake Bay until 1940 when she became a US army accommodation ship for 1,200 troops at St John's NF. In January 1941 she was renamed EDMUND B. ALEXANDER and became a troop transport between New Orleans and Panama. At this time she was only capable of 10 knots and in 1942-3 was rebuilt with one funnel, her mast heights reduced and her engines converted by the Bethlehem Steel Corp, Baltimore to give her a speed of 17 knots. She then operated between New York and Europe with accommodation for 5,000 troops. In March 1946 she was altered to accommodate military dependents (904 adults and 314 children) between New York and Europe. In 1949 she was laid up at Baltimore and in 1951 in the Hudson River. In January 1957 she was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Corp, towed to Baltimore and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway bu N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.411] [ Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

AMERIQUE see IMPERATRICE EUGENIE 1864

AMSTERDAM see BRITISH CROWN 1879

AMSTERDAM 1880
2,949 gross tons, length 320.3ft x beam 39.1ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots, accommodation for 46-1st and 648-3rd class passengers. Launched on 17th Dec.1879 by A. McMillan & Son, Dumbarton for Holland America Line, she started her maiden voyage on 27th Mar.1880 when she sailed from Rotterdam for New York. On 29th Apr.1882 she commenced her first Amsterdam - New York voyage and on 30th Jul.1884 was wrecked on Sable Island, Nova Scotia with the loss of three lives. (North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3 by N.R.P.Bonsor)

AMSTERDAM 1894
The Great Eastern Railway ship AMSTERDAM was a 1,745 gross ton ship, length 302.4ft x beam 36ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots and capacity for 218-1st and 120-2nd class passengers. Built in 1894 by Earle's Shipbuilding Co, Hull, she was delivered in 1894 for the Harwich - Hook of Holland service. In 1910 she transferred to the Harwich - Antwerp route and between 1914-1918 was used as an armed boarding vessel in the Downs off the Kent coast. Transferred to the London & North Eastern Railway Co in 1923 and scrapped in 1928.

ANAPO 1913 see ARAWA 1884

ANCHORIA 1875
The ANCHORIA was built in 1875 by the Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow for their own company. She was 4,168 gross tons, length 408ft x beam 40.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 200-1st, 100-2nd and 800-3rd class. Launched on 27/10/1874, she left Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville and New York on 2/10/1875. In 1887 she was fitted with triple expansion engines and on 2/11/1893 was purchased by the Anchor Line from the Barrow Shipping Co. On 22/9/1904 she commenced her last Glasgow - Moville - New York (arr 4/10/1904) - Glasgow voyage and on 18/4/1906 was sold to London owners. Resold to the Hamburg America Line, her engines were removed and she was used as a depot ship and crew hostel. She was broken up in either 1925(Anchor Line) or 1932 (Bonsor) in Germany. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.460] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line]

ANCONA 1879
Official No.76194, tonnage 3,081 gross tons, length 380.9ft x beam 38.3ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, two cylinder compound engine, speed 12.5 knots, accommodation for 130-1st and 54-2nd class passengers. Launched on 22nd May 1879 by Caird & Co, Greenock (yard No.215) for P & O Steam Navigation Co, she was one of a class of five ships built for the Southampton - Australia Mail service. In Sep.1899 she was sold to Hajee Cassum Joosub, Bombay and renamed TAHER. On 22nd Mar.1901 she was wrecked near Port Louis, Mauritius while inward bound from Aden on a P & O charter.[P & O. A Fleet History by Rabson & O'Donoghue]

ANCONA 1908
The ANCONA was owned by the Italia Line of Genoa. She was a 8,188 gross ton ship, length 482.3ft x beam 58.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation for 60-1st and 2,500-3rd class passengers. Built by Workman Clark & Co Ltd, Belfast, she was launched on 19th Dec.1907. Her maiden voyage started on 26th Mar.1908 when she left Genoa for Naples, New York and Philadelphia. In 1909 accommodation for 120-1st class passengers was added and in Sep.1910 she was refitted to carry 60-1st and 120-2nd class. On 7th Nov.1915 she was torpedoed and sunk by an Austrian submarine south of Sardinia while on passage from Italy to New York with the loss of 206 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1383]

ANCONA 1915 see ARABIA 1897

ANDALUCIA / ANDALUCIA STAR 1926
Built for Blue Star Line by Cammel Laird, Birkenhead as the ANDALUCIA, she was a 12,846 gross ton ship, length 535ft x beam 68.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. She was one of five sister ships and had spacious accommodation for 180-1st class passengers only. Designed for the refigerated meat trade between London and the River Plate ports, she also called at Madeira, Rio de Janeiro and Santos. Launched on 21st Sept.1926, she was completed on Mar.1st 1927 and commenced service that year. In May 1929 she was renamed ANDALUCIA STAR and in 1937 was rebuilt to 14,943 tons and a length of 597 feet and her passenger accommodation reduced to 150-1st class. On Oct.7th 1942, she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.107, while 400 miles west of Monrovia, with the loss of four lives. All five of these sister ships were torpedoed and sunk during the war, two with heavy loss of life. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.3]

ANDALUSIA 1896
The ANDALUSIA was built in 1896 by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 5,457 gross ton ship, length 397.8ft x beam 50ft, one funnel, two masts, steel construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 20-1st and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 1st Sep.1896, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg to New York on 6th Jan.1897. She started her eighth and last voyage on this service on 4th Dec.1897 and was then transferred to the Far East service. In 1900  she was used as a German troopship during the Boxer Rebellion in China. Seized by US authorities in Manila in April 1917 and operated by the US Shipping Board, she was eventually scrapped in 1925. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.403][Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

ANDANIA 1913
The ANDANIA was a 13,405 gross ton ship, length 520.3ft x beam 64ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 520-2nd and 1,540-3rd class passengers. Built by Scott's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co, Greenock, she was launched for the Cunard Steamship Co on 22nd Mar.1913. On 14th Jul.1913 she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool for Southampton, Quebec and Montreal. On 19th Aug.1913 she commenced her first London - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal sailing and in Jan.1914 started the first of three Liverpool - Queenstown - Portland - Boston sailings. She resumed London - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal service in Apr.1914 and between Oct.1914 and Mar.1916 was used as a troop transport. She resumed London - New York sailings on 18th Mar 1916 and on 31st Jan.1917 commenced her first Liverpool - New York voyage. She was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.46 near Rathlin Light, Ireland on 27th Jan.1918 with the loss of 7 lives.  [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.59][Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.2,p.16]

ANDANIA 1921
13,950 gross tons, length 538ft x beam 65.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 484-cabin class and 1,222-3rd class passengers. Launched on 1st Nov.1921 by Hawthorn, Leslie & Co., Hebburn-on-Tyne for Cunard Line, Liverpool, she started her maiden voyage on 1st June 1922 when she sailed from Southampton for Quebec and Montreal. On 18th Nov.1924 she transferred to Hamburg - Southampton - Halifax - New York sailings and commenced her last New York voyage on 26th Oct.1926. Her first Liverpool - Greenock - Belfast - Quebec - Montreal voyage started on 29th Apr.1927 and she continued these sailings until 1939 when she was converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser. On 16th Jun.1940 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UA (Cohausz) about 230 miles WNW ot the Faroe Islands in position 62.36N 15.09W with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.164 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

ANDES / ATLANTIS 1913
The ANDES was a 15,620 gross ton ship, length 590ft x beam 65.3ft, (179.83m x 19.91m), one funnel, two masts, triple screw, speed 17 knots. Accommodation for 380-1st, 250-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched for Royal Mail Steam Packet Co on 8th May 1913. She strted her maiden voyage for Pacific Steam Navigation Co on 26th Sep.1913 when she left Liverpool for Valparaiso, and subsequently sailed between Southampton and Buenos Aires with calls at Lisbon, Rio de Janeiro and Montevideo. Used as an Armed Merchant Cruiser in WWI, she was engaged in a battle with the German raider GREIF, which was sunk. Used on convoy escort work and then used to repatriate British submarine crews trapped at Murmansk. Reconditioned in 1919, she resumed River Plate services until 1929 when she was refitted as a cruising liner for 450-1st class passengers and renamed ATLANTIS. Converted to a hospital ship in 1939, she was initially based at Alexandria, used in the Norwegian evacuation in 1940 and then sent to the Indian Ocean for the next two years. She took part in the Madagascar campaign in 1942 and in 1943 repatriated Italian prisoners of war to Lisbon and Germans to Gothenburg. She continued hospital and repatriation duties until 1946, was reconditioned to carry 900-3rd class passengers and used to carry emigrants from the UK to Australia and New Zealand. Laid up in 1952, she was scrapped the same year. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.5, Royal Mail Line]

ANDRIA 1948
Launched 30th May 1947 as Silverbriar for Silver Line Ltd. 1948 entered the round-the-world service.
1952 to Cunard and started first voyage for Cunard 17th April London - Havre - New York.
1963 sold to China Union Lines renamed Union Faith
1969 on 7th April she collided with three oil barges being towed by the tug Warren J. Doucet off New Orleans. The spillage caught fire and engulfed the Union Faith with the loss of 26 lives including the barge crew. The ship sank off Poydras Wharf, New Orleans and was demolished as she lay.

ANGELINA LAURO / ANGELINA see ORANJE 1938

ANGELO 1874
The ANGELO was built in 1874 by Humphrey and Pearson, Hull for the Wilson Line of Hull. She was a 1,547 gross ton ship, length 258.8ft x beam 33.6ft, one funnel, three masts. Used for Scandinavia / Baltic to UK services. Sold for scrapping to White & White in 1906.

ANGLIA 1869
The ANGLIA was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow (engines by Finnieston Steamship Works, Glasgow) in 1869 for the Anchor Line. She was a 2,253 gross ton ship, length 325.3ft x beam 35ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was capacity for 100-1st class, 80-intermediate and 700-steerage passengers. Launched on 23rd Oct.1869, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville (Ireland) and New York on 29th Jan.1870. Her 39th and last voyage on this service started on 5th Aug.1874 and between 1874-76 she made five Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow voyages. Between 1876-78 she completed 12 London - New York round voyages, 1878-79 Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay (3 Round Voyages), 1879 Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow (2 Round Voyages). In May 1880 she instituted a new London - Halifax - Boston service, but on the 3rd homeward crossing from Boston, she collided with the barque TRONGATE in the Atlantic and sank on 6th Sept.1880 with 200 head of cattle on board. All passengers and crew were taken off safely. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.455][Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line]

ANGLOMAN 1892
4,892 gross tons, length 403.8ft x beam 45.6ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw, speed 11 knots. Cargo steamer with limited passenger accommodation. Launched on 6th Feb.1892 by Laird Bros, Birkenhead for British & North Atlantic SS Co., she was chartered to Warren Line and made her maiden voyage on 12th Apr.1892 for this company from Liverpool to Boston. On 7th May 1896 she was chartered to Dominion Line and started the first of five Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyages for Dominion. Her last voyage on this service commenced 24th Sep.1896 and she then reverted to Warren Line's Liverpool - Boston route. On 9th Feb.1897 she was wrecked near Holyhead, North Wales with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

ANGLO SAXON 1856
The ANGLO-SAXON was built by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton in 1856 for the Allan Line. She was a 1,715 gross ton ship, length 283ft x beam 35.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 75-1st and 350-3rd class passengers. Laid down as the SAXON, she was launched on 8/4/1856 as the ANGLO-SAXON and sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 4/6/1856. She returned home in 10.5 days, and made her second homeward crossing in 9 days 23 hours. It has been stated that on a later occasion, she reached the Rock Light, Liverpool from Quebec in 9 days, 5 hours. On 27/4/1863 she was wrecked in fog, near Cape Race with the loss of 238 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.308]

ANNA KIMBALL 1852
The 'Anna Kimball' was a 848 ton, two-decked ship which was built in 1852 in Marblehead. She sailed under American flag and was owned by Kimball & Co. The port to which she belonged was Beverly.      "Anna Kimball." The following is copied from the "Ship Registers of Boston, MA 1851-1860," WPA 1940, p. 68:246.      Anna Kimball, ship, of Beverly.  Registered at Boston Feb. 23, 1852 - temporary. Built at Marblehead, Mass., in 1852. 484 88/95 tons; length 161 ft. 2 1/2 in., breadth 33 ft. 10 in., depth 16 ft. 11 in.  Master: Joseph Webster.  Owners: Edmund Kimball, Wenham, Mass.  Two decks, three masts, square stern, a billethead.  Certificate of Henry T. Ewell, the builder, on file at Boston. (vol. 52 pp 56) 267.      . . .(the same except for...) registered at Boston April 1, 1858 - temporary.. . .Master: Charles Marsh.  Owners;  Edmund Kimball 19/24, Wenham, Mass.,;  Charles Marsh 3/24, Newburyport, Mass.; Thornton B. Rennell 2/24, Philadelphia, Penn.  . . .Previously temporarily registered #713 at New York, Nov. 26, 1856.  Now cancelled, property partly changed (vol. 58 pp 90) We also have a brief log from the Anna Kimball, May-June 1864 which includes some insurance records and accounts of Capt. E. Lewis (1865), and further accounts: invoice - sales 1855 from Master Samuel B. Pike.

ANNA SALEN see MORMACLAND 1939

ANTENOR 1896 / FORTUNATO
5531 gross tons, length 422ft x beam 49ft, one funnel, single screw, speed 10 knots. Built 1896 by Workman, Clark & Co, Belfast for the Blue Funnel Line who sailed to the Far East and Australia. 1914 transferred to the Dutch subsidiary company N.S.M.'Oceaan', but later returned to the parent company. 1918 torpedoed in the Mediterranean but made port, 1925 sold to Industrie Navale S.A., Genoa and renamed FORTUNATO, 1926 scrapped in Italy.

ANTONIA / WAYLAND 1921
The ANTONIA was a 13,867 gross ton ship, length 519.9ft x beam 65.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. Accommodation for 500-cabin and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Built by Vickers Ltd, Barrow, she was launched for the Cunard Line on 11th Mar.1921. Her maiden voyage started on 15th Jun.1922 when she sailed from London for Southampton, Quebec and Montreal. In July 1927 she was refitted to carry cabin, tourist and 3rd class passengers and on 14th Apr,1928 started her first Liverpool - Greenock - Belfast - Quebec - Montreal sailing. Converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser in 1940, she was sold to the British Admiralty in Mar.1942, converted to a repair ship and renamed WAYLAND. Scrapped at Troon, Scotland in 1948. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.165]

ANTONINA / HAIMON / ANCONA / PIRANGY 1898
Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1898 for the Hamburg South America Line. Her details were - 4,010 gross tons, length 361.1ft x beam 44.8ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 28-1st and 704-3rd class. Launched on 18/6/1898, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Brazil on 25/8/1898. In 1901 she was chartered to Italia Line and sailed between Genoa and the River Plate ports. Purchased by the Hamburg America Line in 1904, she commenced sailing between Hamburg and Para in 1905. On 30/4/1912 she started her first Hamburg - New York voyage and made three North Atlantic crossings, the last starting on 18/4/1914 when she left Hamburg for Boston. In 1914 she was interned at Tampico, Mexico for the duration of the Great War, and in 1920 was towed to Hamburg in a damaged condition. Repaired and surrendered to Britain in 1921, she was sold to German owners in 1922 and renamed HAIMON. In 1927 she was again renamed ANCONA and in 1928 went to Brazilian owners, who renamed her PIRANGY. She was finally scrapped in 1960. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.414] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, p.208]

ANTONIO DELFINO / SIERRA NEVADA / EMPIRE HALLADALE 1921
Built 1921 in Hamburg as the ANTONIO DELFINO for the Hamburg South America Line, she was a 13,589 gross ton ship, twin screw, speed 13 knots with accommodation for 184-1st, 334-2nd and 1,368-3rd class passengers. Used on the Hamburg - River Plate service until 1932 when she was chartered to North German Lloyd and renamed SIERRA NEVADA. At the end of the charter in 1934 she reverted to ANTONIO DELFINO and in 1940 commenced service as a naval accommodation ship at Kiel. 1943 transferred to Gdynia. 1944 used as flagship for officer commanding submarines at Gotenhafen. 1945 transferred over 20,500 refugees from the German eastern territories to the west. May 1945 taken over by British forces at Copenhagen and refitted as a troopship. Nov.1945 allocated to the Ministry of War Transport, managed by Anchor Line and renamed EMPIRE HALLADALE. Oct.1955 laid up and 1956 sold for scrapping at Dalmuir.

AORANGI 1922
The AORANGI was built by Fairfields, Govan in 1922 for the Union SS Co of New Zealand's Canadian-Australian Line. She was a 17,491 gross ton motorship, length 600ft x beam 43.4ft, two funnels, two masts, four propellers and a speed of 18.5 knots. There was accommodation for 440-1st, 300-2nd and 230-3rd class passengers. Launched on 17th Jun.1924, she sailed from Southampton to Vancouver to take up her designated route and then started her maiden voyage on 6th Feb.1925 when she left Vancouver for Honolulu, Suva, Auckland, Wellington and Sydney. Refitted in 1932 to carry 433-1st, 272-cabin and 165-3rd class and in 1938 to carry 248-1st, 266-cabin and 125-3rd class passengers. She continued on the same service, but in Oct.1940 was diverted to take New Zealand troops to Fiji, before returning to her normal route. In the summer of 1941 she was requisitioned by the Ministry of War Transport, sailed to the UK and was converted for trooping. She carried reinforcements to Singapore, refugees from there to Australia, and then made trooping voyages to India, the Middle East and the Mediterranean as well as bringing US and Canadian troops to Europe. She later acted as a depot ship in the Solent for a fleet of about 150 tugs and auxiliary ships during the Normandy invasion. This entailed supplying them with food, water, ammunition, engine spares as well as relief crews, medical supplies and acting as a hospital ship. After this, she was converted to act as the commodore ship for the British Pacific Fleet. After the Japanese surrrender, she was used at Hong Kong as an accommodation ship for men released from war service and waiting to go home. Returned to her owners, she arrived at Sydney on 14th Apr.1946 and was refitted. However, due to labour troubles, the refit wasn't completed until Aug.1948. She resumed service on 16th Sep.1948, but was still plagued with union troubles amongst her stewards and seamen, and she consistently ran at a loss. Subsidized by the Australian, New Zealand and Canadian governments, she continued to run until she arrived at Sydney on 4th Jun.1953. She then sailed to Scotland where she was scrapped.[Steamers of the Past by Capt.J.H.Isherwood, Sea Breezes Magazine, Aug.1975]

AQUITANIA 1913
Built by John Brown & Co, Glasgow in 1913 for the Cunard Steamship Co. She was a 45,647 gross ton ship, overall length 901.5ft x beam 97ft (274,77m x 29,56m), four funnels, two masts, four screws and a speed of 23 knots. There was accommodation for 597-1st, 614-2nd and 2,052-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21st Apr.1913, she started her maiden voyage between Liverpool and New York on 30th May 1914. Her third and last voyage before the Great War, started on 11th Jul.1914 and she was then fitted out as an Armed Merchant Cruiser. In Aug.1914 she was slightly damaged in collision near the Irish coast, returned to Liverpool and was laid up until 1915. At various times between 1915 and 1919 she was used as a troopship, hospital ship and laid up. Her first voyage after the Armistice started 19th Feb.1919 when she was used to repatriate troops from Liverpool and Brest to New York and she made three voyages on this service. She resumed commercial voyages on 14th Jun.1919 when she left Southampton for Halifax and New York. Between Dec.1919 and July 1920 she was converted from coal to oil burning and resumed the Liverpool - New York route on 17th Jul.1920. On 14th Aug.1920 she transferred to the Southampton - Cherbourg - New York service and in 1927 was refitted to carry 1st, 2nd, tourist and 3rd class passengers. In Oct.1931 she became a 1st, tourist and 3rd class ship. In Oct.1931 she made the first ever North Atlantic turnround in two weeks when she left Southampton for New York on 7th Oct. and again on 21st Oct. In Feb.1936 she became cabin, tourist and 3rd class and started her last peacetime voyage between Southampton and New York on 23rd Aug.1939. Between 1939 and 1948 she served as a troopship and on 25th May 1948 started her first Southampton - Halifax voyage with war brides, later with emigrants, making 25 round voyages on this service. Her last sailing started 14th Nov.1949 when she left Southampton for Halifax and she made a total of 443 round voyages on the North Atlantic. She was scrapped at Faslane, Scotland in 1950. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.159]

A Descriptions AA to AQ | AR to AV

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