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SHIP DESCRIPTIONS - B

Please note that ships often changed hands and names many times. If an entry is just the name of the vessel followed by a "see..." then that vessel was renamed and you will find the full history under the redirected name.

BAARN 1927
5,559 gross tons, length 417ft x beam 58.3ft, speed 11 knots, general cargo ship with accommodation for 22-1st and 16-3rd class passengers. Built by C. van der Glessen & Zonen's Scheepswerven N.V., Krimpen, Holland for Royal Netherlands Steamship Co., Amsterdam. On 11th Jul.1943 she was bombed by enemy aircraft during the Sicily landings off Avola at position 36.55N 15.13E and later sunk by allied warship gunfire. 72 survivors, no loss of life. [The World's Merchant Fleets 1939 by Roger Jordan]

BADENIA / HOLM 1902
The BADENIA was built by Furness Withy & Co Ltd, West Hartlepool in 1902 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 6,416 gross ton ship, length 450.1ft x beam 53.2ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 10-1st and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 7/7/1902, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Boston on 22/10/1902. In 1910 she was rebuilt to 7,442 tons and on 1/1/1911 commenced her last voyage from Hamburg to Boston and New York. In 1919 she was ceded to Britain as war reparations and in 1922 was purchased by Reederei Hugo Stinnes and renamed HOLM. In 1926, Stinnes fleet was taken over by Hamburg America Line and she was scrapped in 1929. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.408] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

BAHIA BLANCA 1911
9,349 gross tons, length 149.92m x beam 18.07m one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 108-2nd and 2,300-3rd class passengers.
Launched on 30th December1911 by Reiherstieg, Hamburg for Hamburg South America Line and started her maiden voyage from Hamburg to the River Plate on 14th March 1912. On the outbreak of war in August 1914 she sheltered in Buenos Aires and in 1918 was sold to Argentina. 1935 sold to Italy and renamed UMBRIA. June 1940 scuttled at Port Sudan, later refloated and scrapped.

BAHIA LAURA / CAXIAS / RUY BARBOSA 1913
9,791 gross tons, length 149.7m x beam 18m x depth 11.7m, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 12.5 knots, accommodation for 200-2nd class and 2,370-steerage class passengers. Used on the Hamburg - Argentina service. Launched 29th Apr.1913 by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack for Hamburg South America Line, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg to Buenos Aires on 11th Jul.1913. In Aug.1914 she sheltered in Pernambuco, Brazil due the war and on 1st Jun.1917 was seized by the Brazilian Government, Lloyd Brasileiro appointed managers and renamed CAXIAS. 1923 renamed RUY BARBOSA, 1927 sold to Lloyd Brasileiro, Rio de Janeiro, 31st Jul.1934 wrecked near Leixoes, Portugal while on passage Hamburg to Brazil. ["The Hamburg South America Line" by J. Cooper, A. Kludas and J. Pein]

BALANTIA / SAMFAITHFUL / BETAMAR / ACME 1944
This was a standard wartime U.S. built Liberty ship. 7,210 gross tons, length 441.8ft x beam 57ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw, speed 12 knots. Built by Bethlehem Fairfield Shipyard Inc, Baltimore in 1944 as the SAMFAITHFUL for the British Ministry of War Transport and managed by Royal Mail Lines, London. 1947 purchased by Royal Mail Lines and used mostly on the London - West Indies service (general cargo out and sugar home). 1958 sold to Cia.Nav.Betacruz S.A, Liberia and renamed BETAMAR. 1965 sold to Acme Shipping, Famagusta, Cyprus renamed ACME. 1969 Scrapped at Shanghai. [Merchant Fleets, vol.5 by Duncan Haws]

BALLARAT 1920
The BALLARAT was a 13,033 gross ton ship, length 519.7ft x beam 64.1ft (158.42m x 19.56m), one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 13.5 knots. Built by Harland & Wolff, Greenock, she was one of five sister ships and was launched for Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co (P&O Line), on 4th Sep.1920. There was accommodation for 491- 3rd class passengers plus 743 temporary berths. Her maiden voyage from the UK to Australia via the Cape started on 27th Jan.1922 and in 1929 she was converted to oil fuel and her speed increased to 15 knots. At the same time, her accommodation was altered to carry 586 passengers. She resumed service from London via Malta and Suez to Australia on 7th Jun.1929 and was sold for scrap on 27th May 1935. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O Line]

BALRANALD 1922
13,039 gross tons, length 519.9ft x beam 64.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 491-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Greenock, she was delivered to P & O. Line on 5th Apr.1922 and sailed London - Melbourne - Sydney via the Cape. Re-engined and converted to oil fuel in 1929, she resumed service to Australia via Malta and Colombo. She made her final sailing on 14th Feb.1936 and was then scrapped at Troon. [Merchant Fleets, vol.1 by Duncan Haws]

BALTIC 1850
Built in 1850 by Jacob Bell, New York (engines by Allaire Iron Works, New York) for the Collins Line, she was a 2,123 gross ton ship, length 282.5ft x beam 45ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sails), wooden construction, paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation was provided for 200-1st class passengers. Launched on 5/2/1850, she sailed from New York on her maiden voyage to Liverpool on 16/11/1850. In 1851, accommodation for 80-2nd class passengers was added and between 6th-16th/8/1851 she made a record passage between Liverpool and New York. In approx. 1853 her mizzen (third) mast was removed and she commenced her last Liverpool - New York voyage on 3/2/1858 (arr New York 18/2/1858). This was the last voyage of the company which was then wound up, and the BALTIC was laid up from 1858-9. On 9/7/1859 she was bought by the North Atlantic Steamship Co. and ran between New York and Aspinwall until 1860, when she was laid up again. In 1861 she was used as a Civil War transport, and on 26/4/1866 commenced the first of two round voyages for North American Lloyd between New York, Southampton and Bremen. On 21/2/1867 she sailed fom New York on the first of five round voyages for the New York & Bremen Steamship Co between New York, Southampton and Bremen. Her last voyage commenced on 21/10/1867 and in 1870 her engines were removed. She was finally scrapped in 1880.

BALTIC / VEENDAM 1871
The BALTIC was a 3,707 gross tons ship, length 420ft x beam 40.9ft, one funnel, four masts, iron hull, single screw, service speed 14 knots and accommodation for 166-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast (engines by Maudslay, Sons & Field, London), she was launched for White Star Line on 8th Mar.1871 as the PACIFIC. Renamed BALTIC, she started her maiden voyage between Liverpool, Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 14th Sep.1871. In Jan.1873 she made a record passage from New York to Queenstown of 7 days 20 hours 9 mins at an average speed of 15.09 knots. She continued this service and made several voyages on the same route in 1883 and 1885-7 under charter to Inman Line. Her last Liverpool - New York voyage started 5th May 1888 and she was then sold to Holland America Line, refitted to carry 150-1st and 800-3rd class passengers and renamed VEENDAM. Commenced Rotterdam - New York sailings on 3rd Nov.1888 and on 7th Feb.1898 she sank after striking a submerged wreck in the North Atlantic with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2,p.756 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

BALTIC 1903
The BALTIC was a 23,876 gross ton ship built in 1903 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the White Star Line. Her details were - length 709.2ft x beam 75.6ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 425-1st, 450-2nd and 2,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21st Nov.1903, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to New York on 29th Jun.1904. In 1909 she rescued survivors of the collision between the REPUBLIC and the FLORIDA off the US coast, in which the REPUBLIC sank. On 12th Dec.1918 she commenced her first voyage after the Armistice, from Liverpool to New York and in 1927 her accommodation was altered to carry 393-cabin class, 339-tourist class and 1,150-3rd class passengers. On 17th Sep.1932 she commenced her last voyage from Liverpool to New York and Liverpool and on 17th Feb.1933 sailed for Osaka, Japan where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.763]

BALTIKA 1913 see THERAPIA 1901

BALTIMORE 1868
The BALTIMORE was built in 1868 by Caird & Co, Greenock for North German Lloyd of Bremen. She was a 2,321 gross ton ship, length 285ft x beam 39ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail),iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 84-1st and 600-3rd class. Launched on 3/8/1867, she left Bremen on her maiden voyage to Southampton and Baltimore on 1/3/1868. On the night of 22-23/5/1872 she was in collision off Hastings with the Spanish vessel LORENZO SEMPRUN, was beached, and towed to Southampton for repairs. In 1881 her engines were compounded by AG Weser, Bremen, and on 10/10/1883 she commenced her last Bremen - Baltimore crossing. She was subsequently used for the Bremen - S.America service. Her final voyage started on 30/12/1893 and the following year she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.545-6]

BANFFSHIRE / BRODNESS 1894
5537 gross tons, length 420ft x beam 54ft, one funnel, single screw, speed 11 knots. Built in 1894 by Hawthorn, Leslie & Co, Hebburn-on-Tyne for the Elderslie SS Co (Turnbull, Martin & Co). 1910 transferred to Scottish Shire Line, UK - South Africa - Australia - New Zealand service, 1915 sold to Blue Star Line renamed BRODNESS. 31st Mar.1917 on passage Genoa - Port Said torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UC-38 off Anzio.

BANSHEE 1847
Length 189ft x beam 27ft, iron hull, paddle steamer, built at Rotherhithe on the River Thames in 1847. One of the last mail packets to be ordered by the Admiralty at a cost of £39,000. Used on the Holyhead - Dublin service, she was a fast ship and took four hours to make the passage. The service was taken over by the City of Dublin Steam Packet Co in 1850, who chartered the BANSHEE for a few voyages, in the early 1850s but I have no later information until she was scrapped in 1864. Information from "Irish Passenger Steamship Services, vol.2" by D.B.McNeill. ISBN 0-7153-5248-2

BARADINE 1921
The BARADINE was a 13,072 gross ton, twin screw, 13 knot ship, with one funnel and two masts, built in 1921 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co.(P&O Line). Her sister ship was the BALLARAT. She commenced her maiden voyage on 22nd Sept 1921 when she left London for Capetown, Melbourne and Sydney. She remained on this service until 1929 when she was converted to fuel oil which gave a service speed of 15 knots. From 12/4/1929 she sailed from either London or Liverpool to Malta, Columbo, Melbourne and Sydney. She commenced her last voyage to Sydney on 13/3/1936 and was then sold to the British government, but resold for breaking up at Dalmuir. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

BARBAROSSA / MERCURY  1896
The BARBAROSSA was a 10,769 gross ton vessel built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1896 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North Germen Lloyd]. Her details were - length 525ft x beam 60ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 230-1st, 227-2nd and 1,935-3rd class passengers. Launched on 5/9/1896 she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to the Suez Canal and Australia on 8/1/1897. She commenced her first transatlantic voyage from Bremen to Southampton and New York on 24/5/1897 and her first voyage from Genoa to Naples and New York on 16/3/1906. Her last run from Bremen to Australia started on 21/12/1910 (11 round voyages) and on 4/9/1912 she commenced her first voyage between Bremen, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Galveston. On 6/11/1913 sailed on her last trip between Genoa, Naples and New York (18 round voyages), 30/4/1914 started her last run Bremen - Philadselphia - Baltimore (3 round voyages) and 18/7/1914 last run Bremen - New York. In August she took refuge in New York, due to the outbreak of the Great War and in April 1917 was seized by the USA when America entered the war. She was renamed MERCURY by the US Navy and in 1919, went to the US Shipping Board. In 1920 she went to the Baltic Steamship Corporation but did not actually run for them and in 1924 was scrapped in the USA. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor vol.2,p.559]

BARCELONA 1878
The BARCELONA was a 1,802gross ton ship, 284ft x 34ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. She only carried 20-1st class passengers. Launched in March 1878 for the Thomson Line of Dundee, details of her early career are sparse, but apparently she was used for transporting cattle (and passengers) between the UK and Canada. Later (1882) used on the Mediterranean - Montreal route. Sold in 1890 to Canada & Newfoundland Line (the goodwill of which company was bought by Furness Withy in 1898), she then carried 20-1st class passengers. It seems however, that under her previous Thomson ownership that she carried a considerable number of steerage passengers in addition. In 1898 she made her first Liverpool - St John's NF - Halifax voyage for Furness Withy and was scrapped in 1899.

BARCELONA / ARABIA / ANCONA 1896
Built in 1896 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast as the ARABIA for the Hamburg America Line, her details were - 5,446 gross tons, length 398.3ft x beam 49ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was capacity for 20-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21/11/1896, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg for Boston, Philadelphia and Baltimore on 17/3/1897. On 8/5/1897 she commenced the first of three Hamburg - Montreal sailings and subsequently sailed between Hamburg and New York or Philadelphia. She started her last Hamburg - New York voyage on 12/5/1899 and was then sold to Sloman of Hamburg and renamed BARCELONA. She resumed Hamburg - New York sailings for her new owners on 5/7/1899, and in May 1903 was chartered back to Hamburg America Line. They eventually repurchased her from Sloman in 1907 and she continued North Atlantic voyages until 16/5/1914 when she started her last Hamburg - Baltimore sailing. In June 1914 she started her first New York to the Mediterranean crossing, on route to the Black Sea and was seized by Italy in 1915. Renamed ANCONA, and used by Italian owners until 1924 when she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.403]

BARCELONA 1908
The BARCELONA was a 5,574 gross ton ship, length 415ft x beam 53ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 60-1st, 80-2nd, 24-3rd and 1,000-steerage class passengers.
Launched on 18th Mar.1908 by Charles Connell & Co., Glasgow (engines built by D. Rowan & Co., Glasgow) for the Pinillos Line (Pinillos, Izquierdo y Cia), Cadiz. Maiden voyage 8th May 1908 Genoa - Barcelona - Cadiz - Las Palmas - Montevideo - Buenos Aires. In Nov.1914 she made a single round voyage from Barcelona to Tarragona, Alicante, Malaga, Cadiz and New York. 1925 sold to Compania Oceania, Barcelona. 1927 scrapped at Baltimore.

BARRABOOL 1921
Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Nav.Co (P&O Line) in 1921, she was a 13,148 gross ton ship, length 537ft x beam 64.3ft (163,7m x 19,6m), one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was capacity for 490-3rd class, 700-steerage class as necessary. Launched on 3rd Nov.1921, she commenced sailing between London, Cape Town, Melbourne and Sydney in 1922. In 1929 she was rebuilt to 13,062 tons, fitted with new turbines and boilers and converted from coal to oil fuel, increasing her speed to 15 knots. On 3rd Sep.1929 she started London - Malta - Colombo - Melbourne and Sydney sailings (occasionally from Liverpool). She started her last sailing on 9th Apr.1936 and was then sold to the British Government as a troop transport, but was resold the same year and scrapped at Bo'ness, Firth Of Forth. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.2] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O, Orient & Blue Anchor Lines]

BARRANCA / CHARLES A. BROADWATER / SAMTHAR / CESCO CORRADO 1943
was a 7,252 gross ton cargo ship, length 441.8ft x beam 57ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw, speed 10 knots. Built 1943 as a wartime type "Liberty" ship by Oregon Shipbuilding Co, Portland, Oregon, she was launched as the CHARLES A. BROADWATER, but completed for the British Ministry of War Transport as the SAMTHAR. Managed by Royal Mail Lines until 1947 when she was purchased by Royal Mail and renamed BARRANCA. In 1957 she was sold to Soc. Anon. di Nav. Corrado, Genoa and renamed CESCO CORRADO. July 1967 scrapped at Spezia

BATAVIA / TACOMA / SHIKOTAN MARU 1870
The BATAVIA was a 2,553 gross ton ship, length 327.4ft x beam 39.3ft, clipper bows, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation for 150-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Built by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton, she was launched for the Cunard SS Co on 1st Feb.1870. Her maiden voyage started on 10th May 1870 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She continued Liverpool - USA sailings until starting her last voyage from Liverpool to Queenstown and Boston on 6th Feb.1884. Passed to John Elder (shipbuilders) in 1884 in part exchange for new vessels, she was fitted with new engines and ran on the Pacific for Canadian Pacific Line between 1887-1891. In 1892 she went to Northern Pacific Line and was renamed TACOMA. 1898 to North American Mail Co and in 1901 returned to Northern Pacific Line. Transferred to North Western Commercial in 1904 and was seized by Japan on 15th Mar.1905 during the Russo-Japanese War. Renamed SHIKOTAN MARU, she stranded near Shaiweishan on 3rd Oct.1924, was refloated and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.150]

BATAVIA / POLONIA 1899
The BATAVIA was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1899 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 10,178 gross ton ship, length 501.3ft x beam 62.2 ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 300-2nd and 2,400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11/3/1899, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg to Baltimore on 30/5/1899. In 1906 she was rebuilt to 11,464 tons and on 11/6/1909 she took aboard 300 survivors from the Cunard vessel SLAVONIA which was aground and wrecked off the Azores. On 20/12/1912 she commenced her last voyage from Hamburg to Boston and Baltimore and in 1913 she was transferred to Unione Austriaca and renamed POLONIA. On 23/3/1913 she started sailings from Trieste to Patras, Palermo, Naples, and New York and in June of that year, made her first crossing from Trieste to Quebec and Montreal. In August 1913 she made her second and last voyage on this service and then went back to Hamburg America Line, resumed her previous name of BATAVIA and in March 1914 returned to the Hamburg - Baltimore service. Her last voyage commenced 20/6/1914 when she left Hamburg for New York and back to Hamburg (arr 28/7/1914). During the great War she was used as a German naval transport and on 30/12/1919 surrendered to the Allies and was ceded to France. In 1920 she went to the French company Messageries Maritimes and was scrapped in 1924. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.405-6] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

BATHORI (BATHORY) 1892
2,247 gross tons, length 285.0ft x beam 38.2ft, single screw, speed 11 knots. Completed Oct. 1892 by Wigham Richardson & Co, Newcastle (Yard No.281) for Royal Hungarian Sea Navigation Co. Adria Ltd, Fiume, Austria-Hungary. On 1st Sep.1914 she was shelled and sunk off Vigo by HMS MINERVA.
In the "Register of Merchant Ships Built in 1892" by Starke / Schell. the BATHORI is classed as a general cargo ship, but it is possible that she carried a limited number of passengers.
This is a bit of a mystery ship and there has been a lot of discussion on the ships list regarding this vessel. The general consensus of opinion is that she was an Austro-Hungarian 'feeder' ship which carried passengers from small ports to the major ports where they would board a transatlantic liner. There seems to be no records of her sailing to the USA but emigrants often listed the name of the ship they left home on as opposed to the one they arrived on!—Ted Finch

BATORY 1935
The BATORY of the Polish Gdynia America Line certainly had a colourful history. She was involved in several dubious incidents in the 1940-1950s. In 1949 she had a very doubtful "stowaway" in the person of a communist who had jumped bail from the American courts. He got off on a technical point and the master and 40 of her crew were subsequently decorated by the Russo-Polish government for helping this man. When the ship returned to New York, the US authorities refused shore leave to her crew. In March 1950 she carried a convicted Soviet spy from New York and in August of that year, a dozen undesirables were taken off the ship before she could sail from New York. Soon after that, American dockers refused to handle her cargo. In Nov.1950 she carried a large number of so called delegates to the Soviet "Peace Congress" and in Jan.1951 the Americans refused to carry out repairs on board. Later that year she was blackballed by the Port of New York and had to be transferred to the Gdynia - Bombay - Karachi service until 1956. She went on the Gdynia - Quebec - Montreal service then until 1968 when she was used as an accommodation ship at Gdansk until 1971 when she was scrapped at Hong Kong.

The BATORY was built by Cantieri Riuniti dell' Adriatico, Monfalcone, Italy in 1935 for Gdynia-Amerika Line.  14,287 gross tons, overall length 525.7ft x beam 70.8ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots.  There was accommodation for 370-tourist and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 3rd Jul.1935, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Gdynia to Copenhagen and New York on 18th May 1936. Her last voyage took place in Aug.1939 and between 1939 and 1946 she was used as an Allied troopship. Refitted in 1946 at Antwerp to carry 450-1st and 450-tourist passengers, she sailed from Southampton to New York in April 1947. On 30th Apr.1947 she resumed Gdynia - Copenhagen - Southampton - New York sailings and started her last voyage on this service on 18th Mar.1951. She transferred to Gdynia - Southampton - Suez - Bombay - Karachi sailings on 18th Aug.1951 and started her last voyage on this route on 14th Nov.1956. Refitted at Bremerhaven in 1957 to accommodate 76-1st class and 740-tourist passengers, she started sailings from Gdynia to Copenhagen, Southampton, Quebec and Montreal on 26th Aug.1957. Her last crossing started on 6th Dec.1968 when she left Montreal for Southampton, Copenhagen and Gdynia after 109 round voyages to Canada and two to Boston. In 1969 she became an accommodation ship at Gdansk and in 1971 was scrapped at Hong Kong. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4, p.1600]

BAUMWALL / CHRISTIANIA 1890
2,811 gross tons, length 330.2ft x beam 41ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 11 knots. Accommodation for 10-1st and 620-3rd class passengers. Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, she was launched for the Hansa Line on 28th Aug.1890 as the BAUMWALL. Her first voyage from Hamburg to Quebec and Montreal started on 23rd May 1891 and in March 1892 she was taken over by Hamburg America Line together with the rest of the Hansa Line fleet. Renamed CHRISTIANIA in 1895 she continued Hamburg - Montreal sailings. On 6th Apr.1897 she started her first Stettin - New York sailing and commenced her seventh and last voyage on this route on 26th Sep.1900. Between 30th Apr.1900 and 31st May 1901 she made four Genoa - Naples - New York sailings and started her last Hamburg - New York voyage on 16th Oct.1907. In 1910 she was sold to Emil R.Retzlaff, Stettin and on 14th Feb.1913 was sunk in collision off Borkum Island, Germany. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.399]

BAVARIA / PETROPOLIS 1856
The BAVARIA was built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1856 as the PETROPOLIS for the Hamburg Brazilian Steam Navigation Co. She was a 2,405 gross ton ship, length 282.1ft x beam 39.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st, 136-2nd and 310-3rd class passengers. Launched on 30th Oct.1856, she left Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Southampton, Lisbon, Pernambuco, Bahia and Rio de Janeiro on 20th Feb.1857. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 20th Nov.1857  and was then sold to Hamburg America Line. Renamed BAVARIA on 21st Oct.1858, she started her first Hamburg - Southampton - New York voyage on 1st Nov.1858. In October 1867 she inaugurated the company's first Hamburg - New Orleans voyage and in 1871 was fitted with compound engines by C.A.Day & Co, Southampton. Her last Hamburg - New York voyage commenced on 25th Oct.1873 and she subsequently sailed between Hamburg and the West Indies. Purchased by the Dominion Line on 1st Nov.1876, she sailed from Liverpool for New Orleans on 7th Dec.1876 but was destroyed by fire at sea on the homeward passage on 6th Feb.1877 with no loss of life.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.388] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor]

BAVARIAN 1899
The BAVARIAN was a 10,376 gross ton ship, length 501.1ft x beam 59.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 240-1st, 220-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton, she was launched for the Allan Line on 11th May 1899.  Her maiden voyage started on 24th Aug.1899 when she sailed from Liverpool for Quebec and Montreal. After one further voyage on this route, she was used as a transport ship to South Africa during the Boer War. She resumed Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyages on 9th Oct.1902 and was wrecked near Montreal on 3rd Nov.1905 with no loss of life and was broken up where she lay.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.320]

BAYERN / SUNLOCK 1921
The BAYERN was a 8917 gross ton ship, length 466ft x beam 58ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw, speed 13 knots. Accommodation for 16-cabin and 750-3rd class passengers. Built by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack, she was launched for the Hamburg America Line on 2nd Jun.1921. Her maiden voyage from Hamburg to New York started on 13th Sep.1921 and her last on this route started on 8th Dec.1923. Later used on the Far East service. Sold to Messageries Maritimes, Marseilles on 8th Dec.1936 and renamed SONTAY, she was managed by the Union Castle Mail SS Co from 1940-1945 and then returned to her owners. Sold to Panamanian owners in 1955 and renamed SUNLOCK, she was scrapped in Japan in 1959. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.416] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

BEACON GRANGE 1898
O.N.108366 4,042 gross tons, length 370ft x beam 47.6ft, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 40 passengers and 400 emigrants outbound. Refrigerated passenger / cargo ship built for the frozen meat trade by Workman, Clarke & Co., Belfast (Yard No.146) and owned by Beacon Grange S.S. Co. (Houlder Bros & Co.), London. 1900 company became Houlder Line Ltd. 1906 suffered an engine room fire at sea and personnel were transferred to a German vessel until the fire was extinguished. She then made her own way to Bahia. 24th Dec.1915 en route Patagonia to La Pallice with a cargo of meat, the first of eleven fires broke out and a number of acid bombs with timing mechanisms was found in her cargo. 31st Dec.1917 shelled by U-Boat while 270 miles off the western Irish coast. One gunner killed, but dropped smoke floats and escaped. 6th Sep.1921 while on voyage Newport News to Rio Gallegos with a cargo of coal to pick up a cargo of frozen meat, she was wrecked on the Banco Oliver at the entrance to the port. [Merchant Fleets, vol.38 by Duncan Haws] [Starke / Schell Registers]

BEARN 1881
The BEARN was a 4,134 gross ton ship, length 121,57m x beam 12,25m, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 14 knots. Built by the Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow, she was launched for Societe Generale de Transportes Maritimes of Marseilles on 25th Oct.1881. Her maiden voyage from Marseilles to South American ports started on 15th May 1882 and she continued on this service until 1901 when she was scrapped at Marseilles. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, p.136]

BEAVERASH 1958
4,500 gross tons, length 3758ft, engines aft. Fitted with refrigerated cargo space. Cargo ship built 1958 by A/B Ekensbergs Varv, Stockolm as the MIMER for M. Thorviks Rederi, Oslo, she was purchased in Jan.1963 by Canadian Pacific Steamships Ltd and renamed BEAVERASH. First voyage for CP started 17th Feb.1963 from Zeebrugge to Bremen, Hamburg and St. John, NB. She left London two voyages later on 16th May and made her first voyage into the Great Lakes. In Sep.1968 she made a chartered voyage to the West Indies for Harrison Line, then continued CP Continental - Canada services until Nov.1969. She was then sold to the Friendship Shipping Co., Greece and renamed ZANET. 1980 sold to A Zacharis, Greece renamed AGIOS NIKOLAOS. 1984 sold to Mamfred Shipping Co., Malta renamed NISSAKI. Made only one voyage under this name and then sailed to Gadani Beach, Pakistan where she was scrapped.

BEAVERBRAE / ex HUASCARAN / AURELIA / ROMANZA 1938
The BEAVERBRAE was built as the HUASCARAN for the Hamburg America Line by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1938. She was built as a 10,480 gross ton ship with a length of 487.5ft x beam 60.3ft, one funnel, one mast single screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 32 passengers.
Launched on 15th Dec. 1938, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Hamburg to the West coast of South America and on her return was taken over by the German Navy and converted to a submarine depot ship. She spent most of her time in Norway where she was captured undamaged by the Allies in 1945.
Taken over by the War Assets Corporation, she arrived in Liverpool in April 1947 for a refit. In June she sailed for Montreal as part of Canada's war reparations and was allocated to North American Transports Inc. for use as a cargo liner. At that time she was Canada's largest merchant ship. Purchased by Canadian Pacific on 2nd September 1947, she was renamed BEAVERBRAE and rebuilt to 9,034 gross tons, one funnel, two masts and with cabin accommodation for 74 passengers and dormitory accommodation for a further 699. On 8th February she sailed on her first voyage from St John NB with cargo for London (subsequent cargo voyages to Antwerp) and then to Bremen for passengers; and made 51 sailings from Bremen to Canada with displaced persons.
She was the only "Beaver" ship to carry cargo eastbound and passengers westbound (the others were cargo ships) and was also the only one under Canadian registration and with a Canadian crew. Canadian Pacific worked with the International Refugee Organisation and with the Canadian Christian Council for the Relief of Refugees and the refugees were forwarded from collection points on the German frontiers to the despatching centre in Bremen. Here they were examined by Canadian government officials for health and security. Documentation and embarkation arrangements were handled by the Canadian Pacific office in Bremen. The BEAVERBRAE made an average of one sailing each month and usually carried between 500 and 700 emigrants, of whom approximately one in five were children. They were destined for friends or relatives in Canada and few could speak English. Before the ship reached port, the purser would issue each emigrant with an identification tag, indicating their destination. When advice was received in Montreal that the ship had left Bremen, arrangements were made for two special trains with colonist and baggage cars to be assembled at the port of entry. The first train would usually be routed to Montreal and Toronto, and the second to Winnipeg and points west, almost every car destined to a different part of the country. A special three-car unit was attached to each train to feed the refugees. One car was fitted as a kitchen, the second as a dining car by day and a sleeper for the crew at night, the third being used as a recreation and dining car for the passengers. The BEAVERBRAE made her last emigrant voyage when she left Bremen on 28th July 1954, having carried over 38,000 refugees to Canada.
Sold to Compagnia Genovese d'Armamento, Genoa on 1st November 1954, she was rebuilt at Monfalcone to 10,022 tons and with accommodation for 1,124 tourist class passengers. Renamed AURELIA, she sailed from Trieste on 13th May 1955, via Suez to Australia and made later voyages from Genoa. Re-engined in 1958-59 and rebuilt to 10,480 tons, she started her first Bremen - Suez - Australia voyage on 12th June 1959. In June 1960 she made a Bremen - New York voyage for Council on Student Travel. She made a total of 34 round voyages between English Channel ports and New York between May 1962 and August 1969. In 1970 she was sold to Chandris Lines and was renamed ROMANZA in 1970, she was registered at Piraeus, refitted and used for cruising. Registered at Panama in 1977 and transferred to Armadora Romanza SA, Panama in 1979. The ship was sold to Ambassador Leisure, renamed ROMANTICA in 1991 and cruised in the Eastern Mediterranean until 1997 when she caught fire returning to Cyprus from Egypt. Fortunately there were no casualties and after the ship was abandoned she was towed in Limassol. The burnt out hulk was scrapped the following year.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.4, p.1760] [Canadian Pacific 100 years by George Musk] [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.6, p.171]

BELGENLAND 1878 / VENERE
3,692 gross tons, length 402.9ft x beam 40.2ft, one funnel, four masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 150-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by Barrow Shipbuilding Co, she was launched for the Red Star Line, Antwerp on 24th Dec.1878. Her maiden voyage from Antwerp to Philadelphia started on 30th Mar.1879 and she transferred to Antwerp - New York sailings on 20th May 1879. Her last voyage on this service started 6th Jul.1895 and she was then chartered to the American Line. Reclassified to carry 150-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers, she commenced Philadelphia - Liverpool sailings on 31st Jul.1895 and her last sailing on this route started 17th Oct.1903. Returned to Red Star Line, she was put on the Antwerp - Philadelphia service with 3rd class passengers only. Her last Philadelphia - Antwerp crossing started 7th Dec.1904 and she was then sold to Italian owners and renamed VENERE. Scrapped in 1906.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.850]

BELGENLAND / BELGIC / COLUMBIA 1914
There was a second BELGENLAND. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1914, she was a 27,132 gross ton ship, length 670.4ft x beam 78.4ft, three funnels, two masts, triple screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 500-1st, 500-2nd and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 31st Dec.1914 as the BELGENLAND, it was 1917 before she was completed as the White Star troopship and cargo liner BELGIC with two funnels, three masts and 24,547 tons. In Nov.1918 she made her first voyage after the Armistice from Liverpool to New York and commenced her last voyage on this service on 8th Mar.1921. She then returned to Belfast for completion and rebuild as a passenger liner with three funnels and two masts, and was renamed BELGENLAND. On 4th Apr.1923, she started her first voyage for the Red Star Line between Antwerp, Southampton and New York. In April 1927 her accommodation was altered to 1st, 2nd, tourist and 3rd class, and in May 1929 to 1st, tourist and 3rd class. Her last Antwerp - New York voyage started on 17th Jun.1932 and she then made many New York - West Indies cruises. On 18th Mar.1933, she commenced her last crossing from New York to Southampton, Havre and Antwerp and was laid up. She made three UK - Mediterranean cruises in July - Sept.1933 and was again laid up in London until 10th Jan.1935 when she sailed to New York in ballast. On 26th Jan.1935 she was renamed COLUMBIA and was used by the American owned Panama Pacific Line for cruises to the West Indies. She sailed from New York for Bo'ness on 22nd Apr.1936 and was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.859]

BELGIAN 1864 see HAMMONIA 1854

BELGIAN PRINCE / MOHAWK / HUNGARIAN PRINCE 1902
O.N.111307. 4,765 gross tons, length 391ft x beam 51.2ft, single screw. Built 1901 by Sir James Laing & Sons Ltd, Sunderland (Yard No.578) as the MOHAWK for Menantic SS Co, Bristol. 1902 owned by North Atlantic SS Co., 1912 sold to Prince Line, Newcastle renamed HUNGARIAN PRINCE, 1915 renamed BELGIAN PRINCE, 31st July 1917 torpedoed and sunk by U.55 with the loss of 39 lives, while 175 miles NW of Tory Island, Ireland while on voyage Liverpool to Newport News with a cargo of blue clay.[Register of Merchant Ships Completed in 1901 by Starke / Schell] The book "Pride of the Princes" by N. L. Middlemiss ISBN 1-871128-01-3 contains a photo of her identical sister ship SERVIAN PRINCE.

BELGIC / MOHAWK 1885
4212 gross tons, length 420.3ft x beam 42.4ft, one funnel, four masts (rigged for sail), single screw, speed 14 knots. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast as the BELGIC for White Star Line's Pacific service, she was launched on 3rd Jan.1885. Her maiden voyage from San Francisco to Yokohama and Hong Kong started 28th Nov.1885 and she continued Pacific services until 1898. Sold to Atlantic Transport Line in 1899, she was renamed MOHAWK and started her first voyage from Belfast to London and New York on 5th Aug.1899. Her second voyage between London and New York started 7th Sep.1899 and in Oct.1899 she became a Boer War military transport. In 1903 she was scrapped at Garston.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.2]

BELGIC - see Belgenland 1914

BELGIC / MISSISSIPPI / SAMLAND 1902
10,151 gross tons, length 510ft x beam 58.2ft (155,40m x 17,70m), one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. Accommodation for 1,000-steerage class passengers. Built by the New York Shipbuilding Co, Camden, NJ in 1902 as the MISSISSIPPI for the Atlantic Transport Line's North Atlantic Service. In 1906 she went to Red Star Line for their Antwerp - New York service and was renamed SAMLAND. Sold to the White Star Line in 1911 and renamed BELGIC, she was used from Aug.1911 on the Liverpool - Wellington service (some books say Australia as well). Returned to the Red Star Line in Dec.1913 she resumed the name of SAMLAND and reverted to North Atlantic sailings until 1931 when she was scrapped. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.1]

BELGIQUE / SOUTHAMPTON / IRELAND / CANTABRIA 1855
The BELGIQUE was a 2190 gross ton ship, length 278ft x beam 37ft (84,73m x 11,28m), clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. There was accommodation for 40-1st, 100-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Built by Fabrique Royale de Machines de Paul Van Vlissingen & Dudock Van Heil, Amsterdam, she was launched for Societe Belge des Bateaux a Vapeur Transatlantiques on 26th Apr.1855. She sailed from Antwerp on her maiden voyage on 29th Dec.1855 for New York, but after calling at Southampton and Plymouth, she sprang a serious leak when 700 miles west of the Lizard and after continuous pumping by passengers and crew, returned to Southampton where she underwent extensive repairs and rebuilding. On 30th Aug.1856 she sailed from Southampton for Antwerp and re-commenced her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 4th Oct.1856. Her third and last voyage on this service started on 31st May 1857 (arr.NY 19th June, dep.30th Jun). Renamed SOUTHAMPTON, she was used for trooping to India for the Indian Mutiny in 1857 and then laid up at Antwerp. She sailed for Southampton on 15th Sep.1861 and was sold to Jose Yglesias, London who renamed her IRELAND and on 4th Feb.1862 sailed from Southampton for Cadiz where she was owned by A. Lopez y Cia and renamed CANTABRIA. On 5th Mar.1862 she foundered off the Canary Islands. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.339]

BELGRAVIA 1881
The BELGRAVIA was a 4,977 gross ton ship, built in 1881 by D & W.Henderson Ltd, Glasgow for Henderson Brothers who later became the Anchor Line. Her dimensions were - length 400ft x beam 44.8ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. She was registered in Glasgow and sailed under the British flag. There was accommodation for 64-1st and 1,550-3rd class passengers. Launched on 20/12/1881 for the Indian trade, she started her maiden voyage on 20/3/1882 when she left Glasgow for New York. After this one voyage she inaugurated a service from Glasgow to Liverpool and Calcutta on 23/5/1882 and made 2 round voyages on this service. In 1883 she made 2 voyages from Glasgow direct to New York and on 30/5/1883 commenced the first of 4 voyages between Glasgow, Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. Between 1884 and 1889 she made 10 round voyages between Glasgow, Liverpool and Bombay. between these trips, she made 2 sailings in Oct 1887 and Sept 1888 from Glasgow to Liverpool, Bombay, Calcutta, Mediterranean, New York and Glasgow. In 1889 and 1891 she made two voyages from Glasgow to Liverpool, Calcutta, Mediterranean, New York and Glasgow and from 1890 to 1896 made 14 sailings from Glasgow to Mediterranean ports New York and Glasgow. She commenced her last voyage on 21/3/1896 when she left Genoa for Messina, Naples and New York (arr 29/4/1896) and on 22 May was wrecked on Black Point, St John NB while on route to Liverpool. There were no casualties. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.461] [Merchant Fleets, vol.9, by Duncan Haws]

BELGRAVIA / RIGA / TRANSBALT 1899
The BELGRAVIA was built in 1899 by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 10,155 gross ton ship, length 501.1ft x beam 62.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 300-2nd and 2,400-3rd class. Launched on 10th May 1899, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Baltimore on 16th Aug.1899. She subsequently ran between Hamburg and New York or Baltimore; or Genoa - Naples - New York. In 1900 she was rebuilt to 10,982 tons and on 9th Feb.1905 commenced her last voyage between Hamburg and Baltimore. In May 1905 she was sold to the Russian Navy and renamed RIGA. Transferred to the Black and Asov Sea SS Co, Odessa in 1906 and in 1920 was taken over by the state shipping company, Sovtorgflot and renamed TRANSBALT. Between 1920-1923 she was used as a hospital ship and on June 13th 1945 was torpedoed and sunk in mistake for a Japanese ship, by the US submarine SPADEFISH in La Perouse Strait. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.406] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

BELLE ISLE 1917
9,591 gross ton passenger / cargo ship, length 479ft x beam 58ft, twin screw, speed 13.5 knots. Built 1917 by Forges & Chantiers de la Mediteranee, Havre (Yard No.371) for Chargeurs Reunis, Havre. 5th Jan.1943 seized by Germans at Marseilles. 24th Nov.1943 sunk by air attack in drydock at Toulon. 11th Mar.1944 set on fire by bombardment - total loss. [Information from Registers of Merchant Ships Completed by Starke / Schell.]

BELLONA / BENBRACK 1863
1,914 gross tons, length 300.3ft x beam 34.2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sails), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Accommodation for 20- 1st, 50-2nd and 500-3rd class passengers. Built by Smith & Rodger, Glasgow, she was launched for the London & New York Steamship Line and started her maiden voyage on 26th Sep.1863 when she left London for Havre and New York. Her last voyage on this service started on 29th Apr.1870 and she was then sold to the Hughes Line of Liverpool who used her on their UK to Bombay service. Resold in 1882, she was renamed BENBRACK and was wrecked off Texel, Holland on 23rd Jan.1889. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1,p.597]

BELLONA II 1924
was a cargo steamship, built 1924 by Deutsche Werke, Kiel as the BELLONA for DFDS, Odense. Used mostly on the Denmark - Leith or Newcastle service. In 1939 she became part of the "Maltese Cross Fleet" which was formed as a result of a secret agreement between the German, British and Danish authorities to protect the import of grain and fertilizer from America from attacks by German submarines. This was to maintain the Danish agricultural production which was of benefit to both Germany and the UK and ships were painted with a large Maltese Cross on the hull to aid identification. The operation was cancelled in Mar.1940. In Apr.1940 the Germans invaded Denmark and BELLONA was at Glasgow and was requisitioned by British Ministry of War Transport, allocated to Ellerman Wilson Line, Hull and renamed BELLONA II. On 9th Oct.1940 on voyage Hull to Reykjavik with 300 tons of ice, she was set on fire by German air attack while 4 miles East from Gourdon, Kincardinesshire. She drifted aground at Strathlethan Bay, South of Stonehaven and was wrecked. She had on board 22 crew and 7 fish cargo workers. 6 crew and 3 fish cargo workers were lost. [DFDS by S. Thorsoe] [Lloyds War Losses, vol.1]

BELTANA 1912
The BELTANA was a 11,167 gross ton ship, length 152,43m x beam 19,13m, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock, she was launched for the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Nav. Co (P&O Line) on 24th Jan.1912. Used on the London to Capetown, Melbourne and Sydney service until 1914 when she became a troopship. In 1919 she resumed service to Australia via Suez and in 1930 was sold to Japan with the intention of converting her to a whale factory ship, but she was laid up and eventually scrapped in 1933. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O Line]

BELVEDERE / AUDACIOUS 1913
The BELVEDERE was built by Cantiere Navale Triestino, Monfalcone in 1913 for the Austrian company, Unione Austriaca. She was a 7,644 gross ton ship, length 418ft x beam 54ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a service speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 12-1st, 140-2nd and 1,274-3rd class passengers. Launched on 8/4/1913 for the South American service, but she sailed on 30/8/1913 on her maiden voyage from Trieste for Patras, Messina, Palermo, Algiers and New York. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 20/6/1914 and in 1918 served as a barracks for arsenal workers at Pola. After the war, following a change from Austrian to Italian rule, the company was re-established at Trieste as Cosulich Societa Triestina di Navigazione. She commenced her first postwar voyage on 10/4/1919 from Genoa to Messina and New York with troops. On 13/8/1919 she resumed passenger services from Trieste to Patras, Palermo, Naples and New York. She started her last crossing on 18/9/1922 when she sailed from Trieste for Naples, Algiers and New York and from 1922 - 1936 was used on the South American passenger service. From 1936 she was used for cargo only and in 1941 was seized by the US at Philadelphia and renamed AUDACIOUS. In June 1944 she was scuttled off the Normandy coast as part of "Operation Gooseberry" (Concrete harbour units) [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1333]

BENALLA 1913
11,118 gross tons, length 500ft x beam 62.8ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots. Accomodation for 1,100-3rd class passengers. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock, she was launched for the P.& O. Line on 27th Oct.1912 and made her maiden voyage from London to Colombo, Melbourne and Sydney in Mar.1913. In 1914 she became an Australian Expeditionary Force troopship and in 1917 was placed on the North Atlantic service under the liner requisition scheme. Returned to P & O. service in May 1921 and collided with the PATELLA and had to be beached at Pevensey. In 1927 she transported the first load of steel to Australia for the Sydney Harbour Bridge and in 1931 was scrapped in Japan. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M. Maber] [Merchant Fleets, vol.1 by Duncan Haws]

BEN NEVIS 1852
This is a quote from "The Colonial Clippers" by Basil Lubbock. The BEN NEVIS was the first ship owned by Pilkington & Wilson's White Star Line of Liverpool. She was however, too short and deep for her tonnage, her measurements being:- Length overall 181ft Beam  38ft 6ins Depth of hold  28ft Registered tonnage 1420 Commanded by Captain Heron, she sailed for Melbourne on 27th Sept.1852, with 600 passengers, a cabin passage in her costing £25, and she took 96 days going out. She was built in 1852 by W & R Wright & Smith of Nova Scotia, and ended up in the 1870's on the St Lawrence - Liverpool timber trade.

BENDIGO 1922
The BENDIGO was a 13,039 gross ton ship built by Harland & Wolff, Greenock in 1922 for P.& O. Line. Her details were - length 519.8ft x beam 64.2ft (158,42m x 19,56m), one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 491-3rd class passengers plus 743 temporary berths. Launched on 26th Jan.1922, she commenced service from UK to Australia via the Cape in August of that year. Re-engined and converted from coal to oil fuel in 1929 which gave her a speed of 15 knots. Resumed service from UK to Australia via Malta, Suez and Colombo on 5th Jul.1929 and started her final sailing to Australia on 17th Jan.1936. She was scrapped at Barrow-in-Furness the same year. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P.& O, Orient and Blue Anchor Lines]

BENBRACK 1863 - see BELLONA

BENGAL 1852
Built in 1853 by Tod & McGregor, Partick, Glasgow for P&O Lines, she was a 2,185 gross ton ship, length 295.7ft x beam 38.1ft x depth 25.3ft (90,14m x 11,63m x 7,72m), one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. There was accommodation for 135-1st class passengers. Launched on 30th October 1852, she was the largest steamer in the world at the time. In 1853, after a few Mediterranean voyages, she was transferred to the Calcutta - Suez route, and during the Crimean war, captured a Russian Barque and towed it to Madras. In June 1859 she was driven ashore in a gale at Galle Point, Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and later salvaged. In December 1863, her propellor shaft snapped in the Indian Ocean and she was towed to Aden by P&O's SULTAN, and in 1864 was blown ashore by a cyclone near Calcutta. Left high and dry in the garden of Bishops College, she was only refloated after a channel was cut around her. In 1868 she was used as a troop ship during the Abyssinian Campaign and in July 1870 was sold to the New York, London & China Steamship Co of London. In 1884 she was resold to Gellatly, Hankey, Sewell & Co, London and on March 2nd 1885 was wrecked on Milton Reef, Java. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O, Orient and Blue Anchor Lines]

BENGORE HEAD - see BOHEMIA 1881

BERENGARIA / IMPERATOR 1912
was a luxury liner. She was a 51,969 gross ton ship, length 882.8ft x beam 98.3ft, three funnels, two masts, four propellors and a speed of 22 knots. There was accommodation for 908-1st, 592-2nd, 962-3rd and 1,772-4th class passengers. Built by AG Vulcan, Hamburg, she was launched on 23rd May 1912 for the Hamburg America Line. She started her maiden voyage from Hamburg to Southampton, Cherbourg and New York on 11th Jun.1913 and her last voyage on this route started on 8th July 1914 after which she was laid up at Hamburg. Surrendered to the USA in 1919, she was allocated to Britain as war reparations in 1920 and managed by Cunard Line. After rebuilding, she was used on the Southampton - Cherbourg - New York service and was purchased by Cunard in 1921 and renamed BERENGARIA. She continued the same service until 1938 when, on 3rd March she was damaged by fire at New York. She then sailed to Southampton without passengers, and arrived at Jarrow in December where she was partly dismantled. In 1946 she was towed to Rosyth where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.415]

BERLIN 1867
This was the 2,333 gross ton ship BERLIN built in 1867 by Caird & Co, Greenock for North German Lloyd. Her details were - length 285ft x beam 39ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 84-1st and 600-3rd class. Launched on 1st Oct.1867, she made her maiden voyage in Apr.1868 from Bremen to Southampton and Baltimore. Her first Bremen - South America voyage started in 1879. In 1882 her engines were compounded and she made her last voyage for the company in March 1894 between Bremen and South America. In 1894 she was sold to M.Bruzzo, Italy and was scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.546] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

BERLIN 1894 (picture)
1745 tons, built by Earle's Shipbuilding, Hull in 1894 for the Harwich - Hook of Holland service. She had buff funnels with black tops. On 21st Feb.1907 she was swept across the northern mole at the entrance to the New Waterway in a fierce gale. Her bows broke off and sank, but her stern portion remained fast to the breakwater. Despite rescue attempts, only 10 passengers and 5 crew were saved and the loss of 128 lives made this the worst peacetime disaster in North Sea passenger travel.

BERLIN (2) 1908 / ARABIC
The BERLIN was built by A.G.Weser of Bremen in 1908 for Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd), and was the third vessel of that name they owned. She was a 17,324 gross ton vessel, length 590.2ft x beam 69.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 266-1st class, 246-2nd class and 2,700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 7/11/1908, she sailed from Bremen on 1/5/1909 on her maiden voyage to Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. On 15/5/1909 she made her first voyage from New York to Naples and Genoa and on 14/5/1914 made her last run Genoa - Naples - New York. On 4/6/1914 made first voyage NY - Bremen and 18/7/1914 last voyage on this service. In August 1914 she was converted to a minelayer and it was on 26/10/1914 that one of her mines sank the British battleship HMS AUDACIOUS. On 17/11/1914 she was interned at Trondhiem, Norway and in 1919, surrendered to Britain and was used as a troopship to India under P&O management. In 1920 she was sold to White Star Line, refitted and renamed ARABIC. On 7/9/1921 she left Southampton for one round voyage to Cherbourg and New York and on 20/9/1921 was transferred to NY - Naples - Genoa service, making her last run from Genoa - Naples - Boston - NY in October 1923. She was then refitted to carry 500-cabin class and 1,200-3rd class passengers and on 16/8/1924 commenced the Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - Halifax - New York service until making her last voyage on 11/10/1926. She then went to the Red Star Line and was put onto their NY - Plymouth - Cherbourg - Antwerp run from 30/10/1926 - 27/12/1929. On 11/1/1930 she went back to White Star Line and their NY - Cobh - Liverpool run and was refitted to carry 177-cabin, 319-tourist and 823-3rd class passengers. She made five round voyages on this service, commencing the last one on 16/7/1930 and was then laid up. She was scrapped in 1931 at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2,p.570 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

BERLIN / ADMIRAL NAKHIMOV 1925
The BERLIN was built by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack in 1925 for North German Lloyd. This was a 15,286 gross ton ship, length 549.3ft x beam 69.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 220-1st, 284-2nd and 618-3rd class passengers. Launched on 24/3/1925, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York on 26/9/1925. In October 1929 she was refitted to carry 257-cabin, 261-tourist third cabin and 361-3rd class passengers. In October 1938 she made her last Bremen - New York voyage and was then laid up at Bremen. In 1939 she made two Nazi "Strength through joy" cruises and on 17/7/1939 sustained a boiler explosion at Swinemunde with the loss of 17 lives. Repaired at Hamburg, she became a hospital ship and in 1944 became an accommodation ship. On 1/2/1945 she was sunk by a mine at Swinemunde and in 1948-49 was refloated by the Russians, renamed ADMIRAL NAKHIMOV, and rebuilt at Warnemunde to 17,053 tons. 1957 Handed to the Soviet State shipping line and used mostly in the Black Sea, but also made voyages to Cuba.On 1st Sep. 1986 she sank in the Black Sea following a collision with the PYOTR VASEV with the loss of 398 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.572] [Great Passenger Ships of the World, vol.6 by Arnold Kludas]

BERMUDIAN 1904 / FORT HAMILTON / STELLA D'ITALIA
5530 gross tons, length 425ft x beam 50ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 405 passengers. Built by Sir James Laing & Sons, Sunderland, she was completed in Nov.1904 for the Quebec SS Co's Hamilton - New York service. In 1913 the company became part of Canada Steamship Lines and in Aug.1914, the ship made the first trooping voyage to France with Canadian soldiers before returning to the Bermuda service. In June 1917 she was again taken over for trooping duties, this time in the Mediterranean and was returned to her owners in 1919. The company was taken over by Furness Withy & Co in 1920 and the ship was transferred to the Bermuda & West Indies SS Co and renamed FORT HAMILTON. Sold in 1926 to Cosulich Line, Trieste and renamed STELLA D'ITALIA, she was used for Mediterranean cruising. In 1932 she transferred to Italia Line and later to Lloyd Triestino, Trieste. She was scrapped in 1934. [Merchant Fleets, vol.37 by Duncan Haws]

BERRIMA 1914
The BERRIMA was one of a class of five sister ships, built for the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co.(P&O Line). Built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1914, she was a 11,137 gross ton ship, length 500.1ft x beam 62.2ft (152,43m x 18,97m), one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 1,100-3rd class. Launched on 13th Sep.1913, she ran between London, Capetown, Melbourne and Sydney. In Aug.1914 she was taken over and converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser. Refitted as a troopship in Oct.1914, and in 1917 was used in the North Atlantic under the liner requisition scheme. On 18th Feb.1917 she struck a mine off Portland Bill while inward bound for London, but was beached and repaired. She resumed commercial service on 24th Mar.1920 from London to Brisbane via Suez and subsequently sailed London - Capetown - Melbourne - Sydney. Following the closure of the Capetown route in 1929, she was transferred to the Australian service via the Suez Canal and commenced her last voyage on 26th Apr.1929. In Sep.1930 she was sold to Japanese shipbreakers. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O, Orient and Blue Anchor Lines] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

BERTHA / SAVONA 1871
2,145 gross tons, length 600.6ft x beam 35.4ft, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 11 knots, accommodation for 600-3rd class passengers. Launched by T. R. Oswald, Sunderland in Oct.1871 as the BERTHA for British owners, she was purchased by Sloman, Hamburg on 23rd Nov.1887 and renamed SAVONA. She started her first Hamburg - New York voyage on 10th Dec,1888 and on 13th Jan.1890 sank on voyage from New York to Hamburg. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3,p.1166 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

BILBAO / SANTA RITA 1905
5,650 gross tons, length 119.5m x beam 15.3m, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 10 knots, accommodation for 850-steerage class passengers, crew of 46. 21.10.1905 launched by Reiherstiegwerft, Hamburg as the SANTA RITA for the Hamburg South America Line and delivered to the company in Nov.1905. 1.12.1905 maiden voyage Hamburg - San Nicolas - River Plate. On the outbreak of the Great War, she sheltered at Valparaiso, Chile where she stayed for the duration of the war. 26.8.1918 seized by the Chilean Government whereupon the crew destroyed vital engine parts and in Sept.1920 she was towed to Germany for repair. 29.7.1921 surrendered to the Allied Shipping Commission and allocated to Britain as war reparations. On 22.3.1922 she was resold to the company and renamed BILBAO, her passenger accommodation was removed and she was used as a cargo ship. 1932 sold to Blohm and Voss for scrapping at Hamburg. [The Hamburg South America Line by Arnold Kludas, ISBN 0-905617-50-9 contains photo of the ship]

BILBSTER (ex- SOUTHERNDOWN) / ESSEX COUNTY / POLZELLA 1915
4431 g.t., Built 1915 by Doxford & Sons, Sunderland as the SOUTHERNDOWN for St. Andrews (Cardiff) Ltd (R. E. Morel & Co), London. 1919 sold to Bilbster SS Co (A. H. Gunn), London renamed BILBSTER. 1919 sold to Canada Steamship Lines Ltd, Montreal. 1922 renamed ESSEX COUNTY (same owner). 1925 owned by County SS Co (Japp, Hatch & Co), London. 1926 sold to Eclipse Shipping & Trading Co (J. J. Thomas & Co), London, renamed POLZELLA. 12th Apr,1928 sunk in collision with s/s WHITBY ABBEY, 13 miles NW of the Dudgeon on voyage Tyne to Oran with coal. (picture)

BIRMA see ARUNDEL CASTLE 1894

BIRMANIA 1882
The BIRMANIA was a 2,364 gross ton ship, length 290ft x beam 36.1ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Built by Fratelli Orlando, Leghorn (engines by Palmer & Co, Newcastle), she was launched for Navigazione Generale Italiana on 29th Jan.1882. Her maiden voyage from Genoa to Bombay started on 24th Jun.1882. She started her first voyage from Leghorn to Naples and New York on 17th May 1883, was then used on various routes including South America, and her second transatlantic voyage between Genoa, Messina, Naples and New York commenced 23rd Apr.1890. She made 10 round voyages between Italy and the USA, the last starting on 15th Jul.1892 when she left Genoa for Palermo, Naples and New York. She came under the ownership of Soc.Nazionale di Servizi Marittimi in 1910 and in 1913 went to Sicilia. On 21st May 1916 she was sunk by a German submarine off Marettino Island, Sicily. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1112]

BISMARCK / MAJESTIC / CALEDONIA 1919
This was a 56,551 gross ton ship, overall length 955.8ft x beam 100.1ft, three funnels, two masts, four screws and a speed of 23 knots. There was accommodation for 700-1st, 545-2nd and 850-3rd class passengers. Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg as the BISMARCK for Hamburg America Line, she was launched on 20th Jun.1914. The Great War delayed her completion and she was handed over to the British Government in 1919. Purchased jointly by White Star Line and Cunard, she was completed at Hamburg in March 1922 and sailed on her maiden voyage on 10th May 1922 from Southampton for Cherbourg and New York as the MAJESTIC. In June 1926 her accommodation was refitted as 1st, 2nd, tourist and 3rd class, and again in Oct.1931 to 1st, tourist and 3rd class. On the merger of Cunard and White Star Lines in 1934 she came under the ownership of the newly formed Cunard-White Star Line. Her last Southampton - Cherbourg - New York - Cherbourg - Southampton voyage commenced on 13th Feb.1936 and she was then laid up at Southampton. Sold for scrapping in May 1936, she was resold to the British Admiralty and converted into the boys' training ship CALEDONIA. On 8th Apr.1937 she sailed from Southampton for Rosyth and on 29th Sep.1939 was gutted by fire at Rosyth and sank. Sold to T.W.Ward in 1940 for scrapping, she was raised in 1943 and scrapped at Inverkeithing. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.768]

ship BLACK EAGLE 1854 - ON 10519
The Clipper Ship Black Eagle.— Some considerable interest has been felt in the success of this noble ship, from the fact that its enterprising builder, Mr. John Major, of this town, undertook to build a craft after the North American principle of soft wood, to compete in price with our transatlantic brethren.  The vessel is now ready for sea, having been chartered by government to take emigrants to Australia, and is lying in the Birkenhead dock.  She is the largest wooden vessel ever built on the banks of the Mersey, and her fine large proportions, together with her tall spars, render her an object of attraction to all interested in shipping.  In external appearance she has the same characteristics as an English merchantman, with painted ports, but somewhat finer in her lines than the generality of vessels built here.  Her cutwater is ornamented with a large and well-executed figure of an eagle, represented in the act of taking flight, and the stern is beautifully finished with gilt carvings. 
The Black Eagle possesses fine lines for swift sailing, and her carrying capacity has far exceeded the anticipations of her builder.  A spacious top-gallant forecastle has been constructed for the accommodation of the crew, affording ample room as well as loftiness to the apartment.  At one end of the deckhouse amidships is the kitchen, which is lined throughout with sheet-iron, and fitted in the most compact manner with the latest improvements in cooking apparatus.  Adjoining are the various offices for the officers of the ship.  She has a full poop deck, which, from the size of the vessel, leaves a fine sweep on the main deck for working.  The main cabin is spacious, lofty, and airy, and, from the neat manner in which it is finished, forms one of the leading attractions of the vessel.  The entrance to the cabin is by a companion, the fore part of the poop being devoted to second-class passengers.  The various state-rooms leading from the cabin contain double berths, which are both roomy and well ventilated.  Her 'tween decks are lofty, and every attention has been paid to the comfort and convenience of the passengers.  There is abundance of light and air in every portion of the lower deck, and ample gangway, unoccupied, for walking exercise.   On the main deck the most recent improvements have been introduced for aiding the mariner in his arduous labours.  At convenient distances throughout the vessel small winches have been placed, for hoisting the various tacks, and facilitating a rapid and easy working of the ship.  She carries a large and valuable cargo, in addition to her complement of nearly 500  passengers. 
The length of the Black Eagle is 220 feet, the breadth 42 feet, and the depth inside 23 feet.  Her registered tonnage is 1468, but she is capable of carrying a much larger cargo.   She is built almost entirely of oak and hackmatack, and is well fastened throughout.  She is now the property of Mr. John Alexander, the owner of the Bomerang [sic _ Boomerang], and is commanded by Mr. John Gemmell, who is well known for his nautical abilities and his successful voyages.  Mr. Major, the builder of the Black Eagle, as about laying the keel of a vessel above two thousand tons register, which will also be built of hackmatack, and the price will be about £14 per ton, while the price of an oak vessel is £20 to £21 per ton, and an iron ship £17 10s.  ............ The Black Eagle will probably go into the river to-day (Friday), and take her departure on Sunday.— Liverpool Mercury, 23rd June 1854

BLUCHER / LEOPOLDINA / SUFFREN 1901
The BLUCHER was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1901 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 12,334 gross ton ship, length 525.6ft x beam 62.3ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 390-1st, 230-2nd and 1,550-3rd class passengers. Launched on 23/11/1901, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Boulogne, Southampton and New York on 7/6/1902. Her last voyage on this service commenced on 30/12/1911 and she was subsequently used on the Hamburg to South America route. In August 1914 she was interned at Pernambuco, Brazil and on 1/6/1917 was seized by the Brazilian authorities, who renamed her LEOPOLDINA. On 11/3/1920 she was chartered to the French company, Compagnie Generale Transatlantique and started her first sailing between New York and Havre. Her passenger accommodation was refitted in December 1920 to carry 500-cabin class and 250-3rd class and she was renamed SUFFREN. On 9/5/1923 she commenced Havre - New York sailings and continued on this service until her last round voyage commenced when she left Havre on 22/9/1928. She was then laid up and in 1929 was scrapped at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.408]

BLUE HEN STATE / PRESIDENT GARFIELD / PRESIDENT MADISON / KENMORE / REFUGE 1921
Built by New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, NJ as the BLUE HEN STATE for the United States Shipping Board , this was a 10,533 gross ton ship, length 502.1ft x beam 62.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 160 cabin class passengers. Launched on 23/2/1921, she was assigned to US Mail Line and made her maiden voyage from New York to London in June 1921. She was transferred to United States Lines and renamed PRESIDENT GARFIELD in 1922, and commenced her first voyage between New York - Queenstown (Cobh) - Plymouth - London - Cherbourg - New York on 31/5/1922. On 26/1/1924 she started her last London - Cherbourg - New York crossing and was then puchased by the Dollar Line. She commenced her first New York - round the world voyage on 21/2/1924, calling at Panama, San Francisco, Japan, China, Malaya, Ceylon, Suez Canal, Mediterranean, Boston and New York (arr.5/6/1924). In 1929 she was rebuilt with her island bridge joined to the main superstructure, and on 2/12/1937 started her last round the world voyage, arriving at New York 25/3/1938. Transferred to American President Lines in 1938, she resumed New York - Round the world voyages on 27/1/1939. She started her last sailing on this service on 1/1/1940, arriving New York on 18/4/1940 and then proceeded to Bombay, Cape Town, Trinidad and New York. In December 1940 she was renamed PRESIDENT MADISON and in April 1942 was commisioned as a Navy transport and renamed USS KENMORE(AP-62). She was later converted to a hospital ship and renamed USS REFUGE(AH-11). In July 1946 she was laid up at Olympia, Washington and in 1948 was scrapped at Vancouver, Washington. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1547] [Pacific Liners 1927-72 by Frederick Emmons]

BOCHUM / GENERAL CHERNAKHOVSKY 1922
The BOCHUM was a cargo ship, built by AG Vulkan, Hamburg in 1922 for the German Australian Line. She was 6,121 gross tons, length 450ft x beam 57ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Taken over in 1926 by the Hamburg America Line. Became a transport in 1941 and used between German and Norwegian ports. Ceded to Britain in 1945, allocated to the USSR and renamed GENERAL CHERNAKHOVSKY. No further information.
[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

BODNANT 1919
5342 gross tons, length 412.7 ft x beam 52.3ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 11 knots. Built by John Brown & Co, Glasgow she was launched for the Shipping Controller in May 1919 as the WAR CRANE, but was completed as the BODNANT on 3rd July for the African SS Co (Elder Dempster & Co). Used on the UK - West Africa service, and in 1933 she transferred to Elder Dempster Lines Ltd. On 30th Dec.1940 while en route Hull - Freetown, she was sunk in collision with Ellerman Line's CITY OF BEDFORD, 280 miles south of Iceland. BODNANT was the lead ship in the starboard column of a 32 ship convoy going in the opposite direction and the ships sighted each other too late to take effective avoiding action and both vessels sank without loss of life.[Merchant Fleets vol.20 by Duncan Haws]

BOHEMIA / BENGORE HEAD / POMPEJI / POMPEI 1881
The BOHEMIA was built by A&J.Inglis & Co, Glasgow as the BENGORE HEAD for the Ulster Steamship Co. She was a 3,410 gross ton ship, length 350.5ft x beam 40.2ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation for 100-1st and 1,200-2nd class passengers. Launched on 25th Aug.1881, she was sold to Hamburg America Line on 30th Sep.1881, renamed BOHEMIA and left Hamburg on her maiden voyage to New York on 30th Oct.1881. On 16th Mar.1892 she commenced a single round voyage from Hamburg to New York and Baltimore, and on 17th May.1893 commenced her first voyage between Stettin, Helsingborg, Gothenburg, Christiansand and New York. She started her last voyage between Hamburg and New York on 2nd Apr.1897 and on 11th Jun.1897 commenced sailings between Hamburg, Philadelphia and Baltimore. In 1898 she was sold to the Sloman Line of Hamburg, renamed POMPEJI and made three Hamburg - New York voyages before being sold to Laurello SA, Genoa in 1900 and being renamed POMPEI. She was scrapped in 1905 at Spezia, Italy.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.392-3] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

BOHEMIA 1891
3,190 gross tons, 320ft x 43ft, built 1891 by D & W. Henderson & Co., Glasgow (Yard No.349) for Henderson Bros, Glasgow. Maiden voyage Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York, then used on India services except for occasional Meditarranean voyages. 1899 owned by Anchor Line (Henderson Bros), Glasgow. 1912 sold to Fratelli Accame, Genoa renamed ANGELICA ACCAME. 1923 scrapped at Spezia. [Register of Merchant Vessels Built 1891 by Starke / Schell] [Anchor Line by Duncan Haws]

BOHEMIAN 1870
The BOHEMIAN was a cargo vessel built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1870 for the Bibby Line. This was a 3,113 gross ton ship, length 400ft x beam 37.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, four masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Launched on 16th April 1870, she was used as a Mediterranean trader until sold to the Leyland Line in 1873 with the rest of Bibby Line's fleet. Fitted with new compound engines in 1877, she commenced her first Liverpool - Boston voyage on 24th Nov. 1877 and on 7th February 1881 was wrecked near Crookhaven, Ireland with the loss of 33 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.985] [Sea Breezes Magazine Jan.1949]

BOLIVIA 1873
The BOLIVIA was built by Robert Duncan & Co., Port Glasgow for the Anchor Line. She was a 4,050 gross ton ship, length 400ft x beam 40ft, one funnel, three masts rigged for sail, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots.  There was accommodation for 200-1st, 100-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 25th October 1873, she left Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville (Ireland) and New York on 4th April 1874. On 6 Nov. 1874 she was sold to the Barrow Steamship Co.(a joint company with Anchor Line) and on 23rd April 1881 commenced her first London - New York voyage. After seven round voyages on this run, she resumed the Glasgow - Moville - New York service on 12th May 1882. She stayed on this run until she was transferred to the Glasgow - Naples - New York - Glasgow service in Nov. 1887. In 1891 she was fitted with triple expansion engines and her accommodation modified to cater for 1,350-3rd class passengers only. In 1892 she resumed the Glasgow - New York service for two round voyages and in 1893 carried out a further three and was then repurchased by the Anchor Line. Between 1887 and 1903 she made 45 Mediterranean - New York voyages, interspersed by the occasional Glasgow - New York run. Her last voyage commenced on 9th May 1903 when she left Palermo for Naples and New York and she was scrapped in 1905 at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.459.] [Merchant Fleets by D.Haws, vol.9,Anchor Line]

BOLOGNA 1905
4,553 gross tons, length 380.3ft x beam 46.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 75-1st and 1,290-3rd class passengers. Built 1905 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for Italia Societa di Navigazione a Vapore, Genoa, she started her maiden voyage on 17th Jun.1905 from Genoa to South America. In 1913 she was sold to La Veloce who used her on their Central America service until 1924 when she was transferred to Navigazione Generale Italiana, Genoa and laid up. 1928 scrapped.

BOMBAY 1882
The BOMBAY was a 3,133 gross ton iron hulled ship, speed 12 knots. Built 1882 by C. Mitchell, Newcastle for Nelson, Donkin & Co, London. On 29th Nov.1883 she started the first of two round voyages on charter to Shaw, Savill & Albion Co. between London, Cape Town, Lyttelton and Wellington. Chartered to the Colonial Line she sailed from London for Cape Town, Melbourne and Sydney on 3rd Dec.1885 and probably made just the one voyage on this route. 1910 sold to Norwegian owners, 1922 renamed PROFESSOR GRUVEL. Converted to a whale oil refinery ship, she was sunk by ice on 12th Oct.1927 about 600 miles south of the Falklands.[North Star to Southern Cross by J. Maber] [Dictionary of Disasters at Sea by C. Hocking]

BONN / GREGOR 1895
The BONN was a steamship belonging to Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd] of Bremen. She was a 3,969 gross ton ship, built by Germaniawerft, Kiel in 1895, and her details were - length 355.1ft x beam 43.6ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 20-2nd and 1,043-3rd class passengers. Launched on 25/1/1895, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Bremen to Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 7/9/1895. On 21/12/1895 she commenced her first Bremen - New York voyage and on 18/2/1897 sailed on her first Bremen - Baltimore voyage. Her last sailing on the Bremen - Baltimore route commenced on 9/2/1901 (13 North Atlantic round voyages). She was subsequently used for the S.America service until 1913 when she was sold to other German owners and renamed GREGOR. In Feb.1920 she stranded in the Black Sea. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.558]

The BONTEKOE was a 5033 gross ton ship, length 397ft x beam 49.5ft x depth 22.6ft, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 51-1st class and capacity for 980-deck passengers. Built 1923 by J & K. Smit's, Scheepswerven.Netherlands. The company ran services between Holland, south east Asia, East Indies, Far East, Australia, South Africa and Indian and Pacific Islands. [Merchant Fleets 1939by Roger W. Jordan]

BORDEAUX 1882
The only BORDEAUX I have info on during this time period was owned by the short lived French company - Compagnie Commerciale de Transports a Vapeur Francais. She was a 3,400 gross ton ship, length 379ft x beam 40ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Built in 1882 by Chantiers de la Mediteranee, Havre, she sailed from either Havre or Bordeaux to New Orleans or the West Indies and Central America. The company lost five of their seven ships, including the BORDEAUX, and went into liquidation in 1894, selling their remaining two vessels. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1138-9]

BORINQUEN 1930 - see AROSA STAR

BORKUM / ELLEN RICKMERS / ASTI 1896
The BORKUM was built by J.L.Thompson & Sons, Sunderland (engines by J.Dickinson & Sons, Sunderland) as the ELLEN RICKMERS for the Rickmers Line. She was a 5,350 gross ton ship, length 409ft x beam 50.5ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was capacity for 18-2nd and 950-3rd class passengers. Launched on 27/2/1896, she was chartered to North German Lloyd and commenced the first of six round voyages between Bremen and Baltimore on 24/9/1897, the last starting on 5/1/1900. In 1900 she was purchased by NGL and renamed BORKUM. She commenced her first Bremen - Baltimore - Galveston voyage on 13/9/1900 and made the last of three voyages on this service in February 1905. Between 1905-1913 she sailed between Bremen and South America and in 1914 sailed between Bremen and the Far East. Seized by Italy in 1915 and renamed ASTI, she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine, 220 miles SW of the Scilly Isles on 13/8/1917.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.560-561]

BORUSSIA (1) 1855
BORUSSIA 1855, 2,131 gross tons, length 280ft x beam 38.5ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots, accommodation for 54-1st, 146-2nd and 310-3rd class passengers. Launched on 3rd Jul.1855 by Caird & Co., Greenock for the Hamburg America Line, she was immediately chartered by the British Government as a Crimean War Transport. She started her first Hamburg - New York voyage on 1st Jun.1856 and her last on 30th Apr.1870. Re-engined in 1871, she then transferred to the Hamburg - West Indies service. In 1876 she was sold to the Dominion Line and started her first Liverpool - New Orleans sailing on 2nd Sep.1876 and was scheduled to sail Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal on 1st Aug.1878 but another ship replaced her. On 20th Nov.1879 she sailed from Liverpool for New Orleans, but on 2nd Dec, was abandoned at sea and sank with the loss of 169 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.387 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

BOSNIA / FRANGESTAN 1898
7,436 gross tons, length 485ft x beam 57.4ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw, speed 13 knots. Built by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne, she was launched for Hamburg America Line on 13th Aug.1898 as a cargo ship. Her maiden voyage started 22nd Mar.1899 when she left Hamburg for Baltimore and in 1907 she was rebuilt by Blohm & Voss to 9,683 gross tons, with accommodation for 2,500-3rd class passengers. Her first passenger voyage started on 4th Jun.1907 when she sailed from Hamburg for New York and Baltimore and in 1914, on the outbreak of the Great War, she was transferred to the German Navy. Surrendered to Britain in May 1920, she became the FRANGESTAN for Hajee Nemazee, Bombay in 1922. On 2nd Apr.1924 she was destroyed by fire in the Red Sea. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

BOSPHORUS 1864
2,045 gross tons, length 319ft x beam 36ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Built by Glasgow Engineering & Iron Shipbuilding Co, Glasgow, she was launched on 7th Dec.1864. Chartered to the Warren Line, she started her first voyage from Liverpool to Queenstown (Cobh), Boston and Philadelphia on 16th Jul.1865. She made her last Liverpool - Boston voyage in June 1867 and then presumably the charter ended. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.682]

BOTHNIA 1874
The BOTHNIA belonged to the Cunard Steamship Co and was built by J & G. Thomson, Glasgow in 1874. She was a 4,535 gross ton ship, length 422.3ft x beam 42.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 300-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4th Mar.1874, she sailed from Liverpool on 8th Aug.1874 on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. On 15th Apr.1885 she commenced her first Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston voyage and on 13th Mar.1888 resumed Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailings. On 20th Apr.1893 she went back to the Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston service and started her last voyage on this route on 8th Oct.1896. Sold in 1898, she was scrapped in 1899 at Marseilles. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.152]

BOTHNIA Cunard SS Co. ‘The Illustrated London News’, July 4th, 1874 (courtesy of Tony Dalton)
    This magnificent vessel is the latest addition to the Cunard fleet, and the largest of its steamers. Messrs. James and George Thomson, of Glasgow, have just completed the Bothnia for the Cunard Company’s mail service between Liverpool and New York. The official trial of this ship, under the direction of the Government Controller of Packet Services, took place at Wemyss Bay, in the Clyde, on Tuesday, June 23rd. Upon this occasion, with 1000 tons of dead weight on board, she several times ran the measured mile, averaging a speed of fourteen knots. In every respect she acquitted herself to the utmost satisfaction of those concerned in her success. Amongst the large party on board were the Lord Provost of Glasgow, Mr. John Burns, Sheriff Dickson; Captain Parry, R.N.; Captain Dennistoun, R.N.; the officers of the 64th Regiment, Mr. Stafford Northcote, Mr. Shaw Stewart, Professor Grant, and other gentlemen.
     The Bothnia is of the burden of 4535 tons, registered, and of the following dimensions: —Length over all, 455 ft.; breadth, 44 ft.; depth, 36 ft. She is barque-rigged, has four decks, and is fitted with massive compound engines, of 600 horsepower. The cylinders are jacketed, the small one being 62 in. and the large one 106 in. in diameter. Eight boilers supply the engines, with twenty-four furnaces in all. The bunkers are capable of holding 1200 tons of coal.
     In regard to passenger accommodation, cargo facilities, and general arrangements for working and navigating the vessel, the Bothnia has every advantage. She is fitted with every modern appliance that skill can devise for securing comfort, speed, and safety. Having her spacious saloon amidships, with a large proportion of her airy staterooms on the spar-deck, her cabin passengers enjoy the greatest degree of comfort that it is possible to obtain afloat.
     Like all the vessels of the Cunard fleet, the material and construction of the Bothnia are of the strongest and best kind. With her great strength and capacity she has an elegance and finish of style. Her model is one which promises such results in seagoing qualities as will maintain the well-earned reputation of the Cunard liners.

BOURGOGNE / UITENHAGE 1865
1,966 gross tons, length 318.2ft x beam 31.8ft, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Built by J.Laing & Sons, Sunderland, she was launched on 11th Jan.1865 as the UITENHAGE. She was purchased by Société Générale du Transport Maritime, Marseilles in 1867, renamed BOURGOGNE and started her first voyage from Marseilles to Rio de Janeiro on 15th Sep.1867. In 1868 she commenced Marseilles - Buenos Aires sailings and was re-engined in the1870s. She continued South America voyages until she was scrapped at Marseilles in 1896. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

BOVIC / COLONIAN 1892
The BOVIC was a 6583 gross ton cargo ship with limited passenger accommodation. Her details were - 6583 gross tons, length 470ft x beam 53.1ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw, speed 13 knots. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast as a livestock carrier for the White Star Line, she was launched on 28th Jun.1892. Her maiden voyage started on 26th Aug.1892 when she left Liverpool for New York and on 21st Feb.1914 she started Manchester - New York sailings. Her masts were shortened to funnel height to pass under the Manchester Ship Canal bridges. Requisitioned for government service in 1917-1919 and in 1922 she was transferred to the Leyland Line and renamed COLONIAN. Scrapped at Rotterdam in 1928. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.760] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.2]

BRABANTIA / WILLIAM O'SWALD / RESOLUTE / LOMBARDIA 1914
The RESOLUTE was built by AG Weser, Bremen in 1914 for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 19,653 gross ton ship, length 590.4ft x beam 72.2ft, three funnels, two masts, triple screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 290-1st, 320-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 30/3/1914 as the WILLIAM O'SWALD, she never sailed under that name and was laid up incomplete and transferred in 1916 to Royal Holland Lloyd as reparation for Dutch neutral ships sunk by Germany. She was renamed BRABANTIA and from 1920 was used in the South American service. She was resold in 1922 to the United American Line, renamed RESOLUTE and on 11/4/1922 commenced sailing between Hamburg, Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. In 1923 she came under the Panamanian flag and commenced her last voyage on this service on 13/7/1926. In 1926 she was sold to Hamburg America Line and on 10/8/1926 started sailing between Hamburg, Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. She was refitted in June 1930 to carry 1st, tourist and 3rd class passengers, and again in June 1931 to carry 1st and tourist class only. She commenced her last Hamburg - New York voyage on 22/8/1933 and was then used for cruising. On 22/8/1935 she was sold to Italy for scrapping, but was taken over by the Italian government, renamed LOMBARDIA, refitted to carry 103-1st class and 4,400 troops. Employed as a troopship for the Abyssinian War under the management of Lloyd Triestino and later in the Mediterranean, she was bombed and sunk in dock by allied planes in 1943 at Naples. In 1947 she was scrapped at Spezia. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.417] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

BRAEMAR CASTLE 1898
6,266 gross tons, length 450ft x beam 52.2ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 60-1st and 120-2nd class passengers. Built by Barclay, Curle & Co., Glasgow, she was completed as an intermediate steamer for Donald Currie's Castle Line in Jul.1898 and used on the UK - South Africa service. In 1900 she was transferred to the newly formed Union-Castle Mail Steamship Co. but remained on the same service and in 1909 was used for peacetime trooping, mainly to the East Indies. In 1914 she became a cross channel trooper for the British Expeditionary Force to France and in 1915 took part in the Gallipoli campaign before being converted to a 421 bed hospital ship. Mined in 1916 and towed to Malta and then to La Spezia where she was repaired. In 1918 she was stationed at Murmansk during the Russian Civil War, made one commercial voyage in 1920 and in 1921 returned to Archangel to evacuate sick, wounded and non-Russian medics. During her time as a hospital ship, she carried an amazing 2,600,000 patients. 1922 trooped to Turkey and Cyprus and in 1924 was scrapped in Italy. [Merchant Fleets, vol.18 by Duncan Haws]

BRAEMAR CASTLE 1952
The BRAEMAR CASTLE was built for Union-Castle Line in 1952 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast and was a most beautiful looking ship. She was a 17,029 gross ton vessel, length 576ft x beam 74ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17.5 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 552-cabin class. Launched on 24.5.1952, she sailed on her maiden voyage on 22nd November on the London - round Africa service. This was a service which included two ships sailing out from London via Suez and home via the Cape and two sailing in the reverse direction. Ports of call on the "round Africa" service included Las Palmas, Ascension, St Helena, Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, East London, Durban, Lourenco Marques, Beira, Dar-es-Salaam, Zanzibar, Tanga, Mombasa, Aden, Port Sudan, Port Said, Genoa, Marseilles, and Gibraltar. This service ceased in 1961 and after making a couple of Mediterranean cruises in 1961, the BRAEMAR CASTLE was transferred to the Intermediate service from London to Gibraltar, Genoa, Port Said, Suez, Aden, Mombasa, Zanzibar, Dar-es-Salaam, Beira and Durban, there to turn North again with additional calls at Lourenco Marques(alternate ships), Tanga, Naples and Marseilles (the last two ports being with alternate ships). In 1965 she was used for cruising only and on January 6th 1966, she arrived at Faslane for breaking up, at only 13 years old. [The Cape Run by W.H.Mitchell & L.A.Sawyer]

BRAGA / LAURA / EUROPA 1907
This was the BRAGA of the Fabre Line. Built by Russell & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by J.G.Kincaid & Co, Greenock) in 1907 as the LAURA for Unione Austriaca of Trieste. This was a 6,125 gross ton ship, length 415.3ft x beam 49.6ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st, 75-2nd and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 15/2/1907, she sailed from Trieste on her maiden voyage to Patras and New York on 11/5/1907. She commenced her first voyage to South America in July1911. On 8/5/1914 she started her last voyage between Trieste, Palermo, Algiers and New York and then made a subsequent voyage to South America. From 1914 to 1917 she sheltered at Bahia, Brazil and on 2/7/1917 was seized by the Brazilian authorities, renamed EUROPA and operated by Lloyd Nacional. In December 1919, she was handed to France as war reparations, sold to the Fabre Line of Marseilles and renamed BRAGA. Rebuilt to accommodate 130-cabin and 1,350-3rd class passengers, she sailed on her first voyage from Marseilles to Naples, Palermo and New York on 10th December 1920. On 16th September 1926 she commenced her last New York - Azores - Mediterranean passage and on 16/11/1926 was wrecked on Aspra Island, Greece. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1136]

BRANDENBURG / HECUBA 1902
The BRANDENBURG was built by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack in 1902 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd] of Bremen. She was a 7,532 gross ton ship, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 60-2nd and 1,660-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21/12/1901, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 22/3/1902. She commenced her first voyage from Bremen to Baltimore on 1/5/1902 and subsequently sailed between Bremen and New York and/or Baltimore. On 14/7/1910 she commenced her first voyage from Bremen to Philadelphia and on 23/7/1914 started her last voyage from Bremen to Philadelphia (arr 5/8/1914). She then proceeded to Trondhjem, Norway where she was interned. In 1919 she was surrendered to Britain as war reparations. Her name was unchanged until 1922 when she came under the control of Alfred Holt's Blue Funnel Line and became the HECUBA. In July 1922 she was run down while at anchor at Constantinople by the Byron Line vessel MAID OF MILOS. She was scrapped in 1925. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.565]

BRASILIA / NORSEMAN 1897
10,222 gross tons, length 516ft x beam 62ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw, speed 12 knots. Built with accommodation for 300-2nd and 2,400-steerage class passengers. Launched on 27th Nov.1897 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast as the BRASILIA for the Hamburg America Line, she started her maiden voyage from Belfast to New York on 21st Mar.1898. Her first Hamburg - Baltimore sailing started on 4th May 1898 and in Feb.1900 she was sold to Harland & Wolff and then taken over by the Dominion Line, Liverpool who renamed her NORSEMAN and refitted her for cargo and emigrant work on the North Atlantic. Chartered by the Aberdeen Line in 1910 she started London - Cape Town - Melbourne - Sydney voyages with 3rd class passengers on 7th June and continued this service until starting her last voyage on 30th Jan.1914. On 22nd Jan.1916 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.39 off Salonika while carrying a cargo of mules and munitions. Towed to Mudros where she was beached and later sold to Italy for scrapping. [North Star to Southern Cross by John Maber] [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.1 (photo)] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

BRAUNSCHWEIG 1873
The BRAUNSCHWEIG was built by R.Steele & Co, Greenock, Scotland in 1873 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. She was a 3079 gross ton ship, length 351.3ft x beam 39.1ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 34-1st, 33-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 1/4/1873, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to Southampton and Baltimore on 9/9/1873. On 16/10/1880 she commenced sailing from Bremen to New York and after completing four round voyages on this service, was transferred on 13/1/1887 to the Bremen - Suez Canal - Far East run. On 13/1/1894, she resumed the Bremen - New York service and after eleven voyages, the last commencing 14/1/1896, continued on the Naples - New York run but on 30/5/1896, she commenced her last voyage and was scrapped the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2]

BRAVO 1866
The BRAVO was the first of two ships with this name owned by the Wilson Line of Hull. She was a 1,076 gross ton ship, length 240.1ft x beam 29.2ft, built in 1866 by the London & Glasgow Shipbuilding Co of Glasgow. She sailed on the Baltic and North Sea to Hull service until 1904 when she was sold to Bells Asia Minor Co, Liverpool and was scrapped in 1907 at Alexandria. [The Wilson Line, 1831-1981 by Credland & Thompson]

BREMEN 1858
The BREMEN of 1858 was a 2,674 gross ton ship, built by Caird & Co, Greenock, Scotland for Norddeutscher Lloyd of Bremen. Her details were - length 97,53m x beam 11,88m (320ft x 39ft), she had a clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 160-1st, 110-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 1st February 1858, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 19th June 1858. She continued on this service except for six months repair in 1860, when she fractured her propellor shaft. On 5th November 1873 she started her last voyage from Bremen to Southampton and New York, and in 1874 was sold to Edward Bates of Liverpool who had her engines removed and used her as a sailing vessel. On 16th October 1882 she was wrecked on the South Farralone Islands, California.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.544]

BREMEN 1897 / CONSTANTINOPLE / KING ALEXANDER
10,525 gross tons, length 525ft x beam 60.3ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 230-1st, 250-2nd and 1,850-3rd class passengers. Launched on 15th Nov.1896 by F. Schichau, Danzig for North German Lloyd, Bremen, she started her maiden voyage on 5th Jun.1897 when she left Bremen for Southampton and New York. On 20th Oct.1897 she started her first Bremen - Suez - Australia voyage and on 30th Jun.1900 was badly damaged in the New York dock fire. She was then rebuilt to 550.5ft, 11.570 gross tons and resumed Bremen - Southampton - New York sailings on 12th Oct.1901. On 27th Sep.1911 she started her 16th and last Bremen - Australia sailing and on 20th Jun.1914 started her last Bremen - New York voyage. Laid up until 1919 when she surrendered to Britain and was operated by P & O Line. In 1921 she was sold to Byron Line, renamed CONSTANTINOPLE and from Dec.1921 was used on the Constanza - Constantinople - Piraeus - New York service. She made eight round voyages on this route, the last starting on 4th Sep.1923 and was then renamed KING ALEXANDER (same owners). From May 1924 to Apr.1925 she made four Piraeus - Patras - New York sailings and in 1929 was scrapped at Venice. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2, p.560 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

BRESLAU 1882
was a 1,366 gross ton ship belonging to the Leith, Hull & Hamburg Steam Packet Co. Her details were - length 254.5ft, beam 33.2ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 56-1st class forward of the bridge, 170-2nd class in the poop and a number of steerage passengers in the 'tween deck. Built by Robert Steele & Co, Greenock, she was launched on 22nd Dec.1882 and her sister ship COBLENZ was launched three months later. The two ships maintained a regular service, departing from Leith for Hamburg on Wednesdays and Saturdays. World War I forced her to trade elsewhere and on 14th Jan.1916 she hit a mine six miles off Boulogne and was beached, but later salvaged. In 1917 she was involved in a gun battle with a U-Boat in the Atlantic, but escaped. After the war, she was transferred to the Leith-Copenhagen service until 1928 when she returned to the Hamburg trade. She was scrapped at Queensferry in 1932. [A Century of North Sea Passenger Steamers by Ambrose Greenway, published by Ian Allan Ltd, ISBN 0-7110-1338-1]

BRESLAU / BRIDGEPORT / LARKSPUR 1901
The BRESLAU was a 7,524 gross ton ship, length 429.3ft x beam 54.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. Accommodation for 60-2nd and 1,660-3rd class passengers. Built by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack, she was launched for North German Lloyd, Bremen on 14th Aug.1901. Her maiden voyage started 23rd Nov.1901 when she left Bremen for New York, and on 3rd Apr.1902 she started her first Bremen - Baltimore sailing. 10th Sep.1903 first Bremen - Baltimore - Galveston voyage, 24th Mar.1910 first Bremen - Philadelphia and 6th May 1914 first Bremen - Boston - New Orleans sailing. Her last voyage for NGL started 8th Jul.1914 when she sailed from Bremen for Emden, Boston, New York and New Orleans, where she took refuge on the outbreak of the Great War. Seized by US Authorities in Apr.1917, she became the US Navy transport BRIDGEPORT. In 1943 she was converted to the US Hospital ship LARKSPUR and in 1946 became the US Army Transport BRIDGEPORT. Scrapped in 1948.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.565]

BRIDGEPORT - see BRESLAU 1901

BRISBANE / DAMAO 1911
5,668 gross tons, built 1911 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Newcastle-on-Tyne for the Deutsche-Australische Dampfschiffs-Gesselschaft, Hamburg, 1914 laid up at Mormugao, 1916 seized by Portugal and renamed DAMAO. 28th April 1918 torpedoed and sunk in St. Georges Channel by German submarine U.91 on voyage New York - Liverpool.

BRISTOL 1875
1,983 gross tons, length 278ft x beam 38.3ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots. Built 1873 by M. Pearse & Co., Stockton as the CITY OF VALPARAISO for British owners. 1879 purchased by Great Western SS Co. and renamed BRISTOL. 6th Jun.1879 first voyage Bristol - New York. 31st Jan.1885 last voyage Bristol - New York - Bristol and then laid up. 19th Oct.1886 started single round voyage Newport, South Wales - New York. 20th Dec.1886 sailed Swansea - New York. 1887 sold to Costa Rican owners renamed COSTA RICA. 1897 sold to Canada renamed BRISTOL. 2nd Jan.1902 wrecked at Dixon Entrance, British Columbia with loss of 5 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor]

BRITANNIA 1840
1135 gross tons, length 207ft x beam 34ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, rigged for sail, wooden hull, side paddle wheels, speed 9 knots. Accommodation for 115-1st class passengers. Built by Robert Duncan, Greenock (engines by Robert Napier, Glasgow), launched for Cunard on 5.2.1840. Maiden voyage 4.7.1840 Liverpool - Halifax - Boston. Feb.1844 iced in at Boston and had to cut an escape channel. 14.9.1847 stranded at Cape Race, refloated and repaired at New York. 18.11.1848, 40th and last voyage Liverpool - Halifax - Boston. 1849 sold to Germany renamed BARBAROSSA, 1852 transferred to Prussian Navy, 1880 sunk as target ship.

BRITANNIA 1863
The BRITANNIA was a 1,392 gross ton ship, length 261.5ft x beam 33.1ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 40-1st, 90-2nd and 300-3rd class passengers. Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, she was launched for the Anchor Line of Glasgow on 18th Jun.1863. Her maiden voyage started on 8th Jul.1863 when she left Glasgow for Quebec and Montreal and her first Glasgow - New York voyage started on 14th Nov.1863. In Dec.1869 she made a single round voyage between Glasgow, Palermo, New York and Glasgow and between 1870-1873 sailed between Glasgow, Moville (N.Ireland) and New York. She was wrecked on the Isle of Arran, Scotland on 29th Jan.1873 with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.451]

BRITANNIA 1879
Built by D & W Henderson, Glasgow in 1879 for the British, Anchor Line. 3069 gross tons, length 350ft x beam 38.5ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. I have no information on her accommodation. Launched on 21/8/1879 for the Bombay service, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Glasgow to Liverpool and Bombay in September of that year. Between 1882 and 1904 she was used on the Indian service and on 3/1/1888 she commenced a voyage from Calcutta - Port Said - New York. In 1892 she started her first voyage from Glasgow - Trieste (Dep.22/8/1892), Kalamata - Messina - Naples - New York (arr.11/10/1892). Between 1892 and 1897 she made 10 round voyages between the Mediterranean and New York, and in 1901, made two similar voyages. She started her last Mediteranean - NY run on 3/5/1901 when she left Marseilles for Genoa, Leghorn, Naples and New York, arriving on 31/5/1901 with 654-3rd class passengers. She then went back to the India service and was sold in Bombay on 12/2/1908 and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.463]

BRITANNIA / AMERICA 1881
Built by T.Royden & Sons, Liverpool in 1881 for the French, Fabre Line. She was a 2456 gross ton vessel, length 328ft x beam 40.4ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 18-1st class and 1,000-3rd class passengers. She was launched on 25/10/1881 and sailed from Marseilles on her maiden voyage to Bone, Almeria, Malaga and New York on 30/8/1882. In May 1883, she broke her shaft in the North Atlantic and was towed to Cadiz by a Spanish steamer; thence to Marseilles by the Paquet Line vessel MOSELLE. On 2/10/1901 she commenced her last voyage from Marseilles to Almeria, Malaga and New York and was then renamed AMERICA. On 17/5/1902 she sailed on her first voyage under this name from Marseilles to Messina, Naples and New York and in June 1906, she again broke her shaft in the N.Atlantic and was towed to Bermuda by the Italian vessel DINNAMARE. On 9/10/1907 she started her last round voyage between Marseilles, Denia and New York and in April 1909 was sold and scrapped at Leghorn, Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1132]

BRITANNIA 1887
The BRITANNIA was a 6,525 gross ton ship, length 465.7ft x beam 52ft, two funnels, four masts (rigged for sail), single screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 250-1st and 160-2nd class passengers. This ship was one of five sister ships known as the "Jubilee" class and at the time of building were the company's largest, fastest, longest and most expensive ships, a distinction which they held for only four years. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock for P&O Steam Nav. Co, she ran aground on her delivery voyage in the River Thames on 18th Oct.1887. Undamaged, she started her maiden voyage on 5th Nov.1887 when she left London for Colombo, Melbourne and Sydney. In 1894 she ran aground in the Suez Canal but was refloated. Between 1894-95 she was chartered for six months to the British Government for trooping, and in 1907 carried Prince Fushimi of Japan on a state visit to Britain. She was broken up at Genoa in 1909. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O, Orient and Blue Anchor Lines]

BRITANNIA 1926
8,799 gross tons, length 460ft x beam 59ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 175-1st class passengers. Built 1926 by Alex Stephen & Sons, Linthouse for the Anchor Line, Glasgow, she started her maiden voyage to Bombay on 3rd Mar.1926 and spent the remainder of her life on this route. On 25th Mar.1941 she was engaged by the German Auxiliary Cruiser THOR (ex-Oldenburg-Portuguese Line SANTA CRUZ). After an hour's engagement 750 miles west of Freetown the BRITANNIA abandoned ship. 127 passengers and 122 crew were lost. 63 survivors were rescued by the Spanish s/s BACHI and a further 38 reached Brazil after sailing for 23 days in a lifeboat.

BRITANNIA 1929
4,216 gross ton passenger ship, length 360ft x beam 50.1ft, single screw, speed 17½ knots, accommodation for 264 passengers. Built 1929 by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Newcastle. Launched in February 1929 for Rederi A/B Svenska Lloyd, Goteborg (Swedish Lloyd), she made her maiden voyage in June 1929. She made regular sailings between Goteborg and London and was fitted with refrigerated cargo space for the carriage of butter, eggs, bacon, etc. After the war, she was employed in the repatriation of British soldiers and prisoners from Germany before returning to normal duties. 1966 sold to Cia. Armadora de Sudamerica S.A. (Hellenic Mediterranean Lines Ltd), Panama and renamed CYNTHIA. 1969 transferred to Cynthian Navigation Co., Famagusta, Cyprus. 1973 scrapped at Vado.

BRITANNIC 1874
The BRITANNIC was a 5,004 gross ton ship, length 455ft x beam 45.2ft, two funnels, four masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a service speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 220-1st and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast (engines by Maudslay, Sons and Field, London), she was laid down as the HELLENIC, but was launched for the White Star Line as the BRITANNIC on 3rd Feb.1874. She left Liverpool on 25th Jun.1874 on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York and made record passages in Nov. and Dec.1876, the fastest being 7 days 12 hours 41 mins between Sandy Hook and Queenstown at an average speed of 15.94 knots. On 19th May 1887 she collided with the White Star liner CELTIC off Sandy Hook and both ships were damaged. Her last Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailing started on 16th Aug.1899 and she was then used as a Boer War transport. Scrapped at Hamburg in 1903. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.757; vol.5, p.1877]

BRITANNIC 1914
48,158 gross tons, length 852ft x beam 94ft, four funnels, two masts, triple screw, speed 21 knots, designed with accommodation for 790-1st, 830-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers.
Launched on 26th Feb.1914 by Harland & Wolff, Belfasr for the White Star Line, she never sailed on the North Atlantic, but on 8th Dec.1915 was handed over to the Admiralty and commissioned as a hospital ship. She was drafted onto the Dardanelles campaign and for the next year sailed between Lemnos, Naples and Southampton, conveying home wounded men who had been evacuated by smaller vessels from Gallipoli. On 21st Nov.1916 on her sixth round voyage and outward bound, she struck a mine which had been laid by the German submarine U.73 while 4 miles west of Port St. Nikolo in the Kea Channel. The explosion damaged her starboard side and opened two watertight compartments. This, combined with the failure of the watertight door system caused her to sink within an hour, despite efforts to beach her. Fortunately she wasn't carrying any wounded at the time, but had 625 crew and 500 medical staff. 21 lives were lost.
The BRITANNIC was the third of White Star Line's great trio of transatlantic liners, the other two being the TITANIC and OLYMPIC, which was scrapped in 1937.

BRITANNIC 1929
This was a 26,943 gross ton motor ship, built in 1929 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the White Star Line. Her details were - overall length 71.8ft x beam 82.5ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. She was fitted with accommodation for 504-cabin, 551-tourist and 506-3rd class passengers. Launched on 6th Aug.1929, she started her maiden voyage on 28th June 1930 when she left Liverpool for Belfast, Glasgow and New York. In 1934 she came under the ownership of the combined Cunard-White Star Line and ran a Liverpool - New York service at first and commenced London - Southampton - New York sailings on 19th Apr.1935. She made her last voyage on this service in August 1939 and was then requisitioned as a troopship and sailed from Greenock for Bombay on 5th Sep.1939. In March 1947 she was returned to Cunard-White Star Line and refitted at Liverpool to 27,650 gross tons, and with accommodation for 429-1st and 564-tourist class passengers. She resumed Liverpool - New York sailings on 22nd May 1948, and on 1st Jun.1950 collided with the US ship PIONEER LAND in the Ambrose Channel, but continued with her voyage. Her last Liverpool - New York sailing started on 11th Nov.1960, and on 16th Dec.1960 she sailed from Liverpool for Inverkeithing where she was scrapped. She was the last ship to be painted in White Star Line colours (buff funnels with black tops) which she wore until scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.770]

BRITISH CROWN / AMSTERDAM / AMSTERDA 1879
The AMSTERDAM was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1879 as the BRITISH CROWN for British Shipowners, but was immediately chartered to the American Line. She was a 3,563 gross ton vessel, length 410.3ft x beam 39ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 2/8/1879, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage for the American Line to Philadelphia on 15/10/1879. She started her last voyage on this service on 19/8/1885 and then went to the Anchor Line, who used her on their London - Halifax - Boston service for four round voyages. In July 1887 she went to the Furness Line who used her on the same run for three round voyages. She was sold to Holland America Line at the end of 1887 and renamed AMSTERDAM. Refitted to carry 80-1st, 80-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. On 31/12/1887 she commenced sailings from Rotterdam to New York. In 1893 she was fitted with triple expansion engines and in 1899 her accommodation was altered to 2nd and 3rd class only. She started her last Amsterdam - New York voyage on 4/2/1905 and was then sold to an Italian company who renamed her AMSTERDA and was later scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.941]

BRITISH EMPIRE / ROTTERDAM 1878
The BRITISH EMPIRE was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast (engines by G.Forrester & Co, Liverpool)for British Shipowners Co. in 1878. She was a 3,361 gross ton ship, length 392.3ft x beam 39ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 7th Mar.1878, she was chartered to American Line and started her maiden voyage on 25th Sep.1878 when she left Liverpool for Philadelphia. On 1st Sep.1880 she started her last Philadelphia - Liverpool sailing and commenced a single round voyage on 30th May 1885 from Liverpool to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York under charter to the Guion Line. In 1886 she was sold to the Holland America Line, renamed ROTTERDAM and fitted with accommodation for 70-1st, 70-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. She started Rotterdam - New York sailings on 6th Nov.1886 and commenced her first sailing from Amsterdam to New York on 8th Feb.1890. On 15th Oct.1895 she started her last Amsterdam - New York voyage and was then renamed EDAM. She resumed the same service on 28th Nov.1895 and started her last Amsterdam - New York voyage on 19th Jan.1899. Resumed Rotterdam - New York sailings until commencing her final voyage on 27th May 1899 and was scrapped in Italy the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.940]

BRITISH EMPIRE / CAMPANIA / CAMPANELLO / FLAVIA 1901
The CAMPANELLO was a 9,001 gross ton ship, built in 1901 by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne. Her details were - length 470ft x beam 56.8ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was capacity for 70-1st and 2,200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29/8/1901 as the BRITISH EMPIRE for British Shipowners Co, she sailed for the Phoenix Line between Antwerp and New York as a cargo ship. In 1906 she was purchased by the Italian owned Navigazione Generale Italiana, fitted with passenger accommodation and renamed CAMPANIA. She commenced her first Genoa - Naples - Palermo - New York voyage on 7/3/1907 and her last on 17/5/1909. In 1910 she was chartered to the British owned Northwest Transport and started her first Hamburg - Rotterdam - Halifax - New York voyage on 16/2/1910. She made one further sailing on 5/4/1910 from Rotterdam to Halifax and New York and was then sold by NGI to Canadian Northern Steamships, who chartered her to their subsidiary Uranium Steamship Co. On 21/5/1910 she started her first Rotterdam - Halifax - New York voyage for these owners, and commenced her third and last sailing on this route on 13/8/1910. Renamed CAMPANELLO, she resumed the same service on 22/9/1910 and started her last Rotterdam - Halifax - New York voyage on 9/7/1914. In October 1914 she transferred to Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal sailings. In 1916, the fleet and goodwill of the Canadian Northern and Uranium SS Co were bought by Cunard, the ship was renamed FLAVIA and continued Avonmouth - Canada sailings. On 24/8/1918 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.107 off Tory Island, Northern Ireland. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1117]

BRITISH KING / WERKENDAM / HARBIN 1881
3559 gross tons, length 410.3ft x beam 39ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw, speed 12 knots. Launched in Jan.1881 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for British Shipowners Ltd, she was chartered to American Line on completion, and sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Philadelphia on 9th Apr.1881. Her last sailing from Philadelphia to Liverpool started on 29th May 1882 and on 20th Jan.1883 was chartered to the New Zealand Shipping Co and Shaw, Savill & Albion Line for their joint London - New Zealand service. After four voyages, she returned to American Line's Liverpool - Philadelphia run in Dec.1884. She continued this service until making her last sailing on 6th Nov.1889 with the exception of one Liverpool - Queenstown (Cobh) - New York voyage for Guion Line in May 1885. Sold to the Holland America Line in 1889, she was renamed WERKENDAM and started Rotterdam - New York sailings on 22nd Feb.1890. Her last voyage on this service started 8th Mar.1900 and she was then sold to the Chinese Eastern Railway and renamed HARBIN. She was scuttled by the Russians at Port Arthur in 1904. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.941]

BRITISH PRINCE / LES ANDES 1882
The BRITISH PRINCE was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1882 for British Shipowners. She was a 3,871gross ton vessel, length 420.1ft x beam 42.2ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. I have no information on her passenger capacity. Launched on 4/2/1882, she was chartered to American Line and sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Philadelphia on 12/4/1882. Shecommenced her last voyage from Philadelphia to Liverpool on 28/3/1894 and in 1895 was chartered to the Dominion Line. She made one round voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal for this company commencing 1/5/1895 and was then sold to French owners. She was renamed LES ANDES and was finally scrapped in June 1908.

BRITISH PRINCE / SANNIO / NAPOLI 1899
The SANNIO was a 9,203 gross ton ship, length 470ft x beam 56.8ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 70-1st and 2,200-3rd class passengers. Built by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne, shee was launched on 21st Oct.1899 for British Shipowners Ltd as the BRITISH PRINCE. She ran for the Phoenix Line between Antwerp and New York and in 1906 was sold to Navigazione Generale Italiana who renamed her SANNIO and had her fitted with passenger accommodation. She started her first Genoa - Naples - Palermo - New York sailing on 31st May 1906 and her last on 1st Apr.1911. In Jan.1913 she was sold to Italia and renamed NAPOLI. Her first Genoa - Naples - New York - Philadelphia sailing started on 28th Mar.1913 and her first voyage from Genoa - Palermo - Naples - Halifax - Boston started 18th Aug.1913. In 1917 she was sold to Transoceanica of Italy and on 4th Jul.1918 was sunk in collision with the Norwegian ship OTTO SVERDRUP in the Mediterranean. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1117]

BRITISH PRINCESS / LES ALPES 1882
This was a 3,864 gross ton ship, built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1882 for British owners. Her details were - length 420.1ft x beam 42.2ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched in December 1882, she was chartered to American Line and commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Philadelphia on 28th April 1883. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 16th May 1894 and was sold to French owners and renamed LES ALPES the following year. In 1910 she was scrapped at Marseilles. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.942]

BRITISH PRINCESS / LAZIO / PALERMO 1899
9,203 gross tons, length 470ft x beam 56.8ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw, speed 13 knots. Accommodation for 70-1st and 2,200-3rd class passengers. Built by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne as the cargo ship BRITISH PRINCESS for British Shipowners Ltd. Launched on 11th Jul.1899, she ran for the Phoenix Line between Antwerp and New York until 1906 when she was sold to Navigazione Generale Italiana, fitted with passenger accommodation and renamed LAZIO. Her first voyage from Genoa to Palermo, Naples and New York started 21st Mar.1906 and her last on 21st May 1913. Renamed PALERMO for the same owners, she commenced her first Genoa - Naples - Halifax - Boston sailing on 8th Jul.1913 and was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine near San Sebastian, Spain on 2nd Dec.1916. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1116]

BRITISH QUEEN / OBDAM / McPHERSON / BROOKLYN 1880
3,558 gross tons, length 410.3ft x beam 39ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw, speed 12 knots. Launched on 4th Nov.1880 by Harland & Wolff Ltd, Belfast (engines by J. Jack & Co., Liverpool), for British Shipowners Ltd, as the BRITISH QUEEN. 1881 chartered to American Line. 31 January 1881, maiden voyage, Liverpool- Philadelphia. 27 January 1883, last voyage, Liverpool-Philadelphia. 1883 chartered to New Zealand Shipping Co. and Shaw, Savill & Albion Line. 22 March 1883, first voyage, London-New Zealand (4 roundtrip voyages). 1885 chartered to Anchor Line. 28 May 1885, first voyage, London-New York. 19 October 1885, last voyage, London-New York (3 roundtrip voyages). December 1885, first voyage, London-Halifax-Boston. June 1886, last voyage, London-Halifax-Boston (4 roundtrip voyages). 1887 chartered to Inman Line. 10 May 1887, first voyage, Liverpool-New York. 19 July 1887, last voyage, Liverpool-New York (3 roundtrip voyages). Aug.1887 chartered to Furness Line. August 1887, first voyage, London-Boston. November 1888, last voyage, London-Boston. 1889 purchased by the Holland America Line and renamed OBDAM; accommodation for 80-1st, 60-2nd and 800 steerage class passengers. 23 March 1889, first voyage, Rotterdam-New York. 1896 fitted with triple-expansion engines. 9 June 1898, last voyage, Rotterdam-New York. 1898, McPHERSON (U.S. Army transport). 1905 acquired by the Frank Zotti Steamship Co (Zotti Line), New York and renamed BROOKLYN. 19 October 1905, first voyage, New York-Azores- Naples-Genoa. 23 June 1906, last voyage, Marseilles-Azores-New York (5 roundtrip voyages). 1906, S.V. LUCKENBACH, Luckenbach Line (USA). 1915, ONEGA (U.S.). 30 August 1918, torpedoed and sunk in the English Channel by German submarine UB 123 [North Atlantic Seaway, vol. 3, p. 941 by N.R.P.Bonsor].

BRITON 1861
O.N.29884, 1,164 gross ton, 248ft x 30.7ft, iron hull, single screw, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), accommodation for 60-1st and 60-fore cabin passengers. Built 1861 by Charles Lungley & Co., Deptford, London for the Union Line, she arrived in Cape Town on her maiden voyage on 15th Dec.1862 making the fastest yet Union Line voyage from Plymouth to Cape Town in 31 days 14 hours. In Nov.1873 she was sold to The Admiralty as a transport, renamed HMS DROMEDARY and used on the Ashanti War service. 1874 after leaving Ascension, she broke down and had to return to the U.K. under sail. Uneconomical to repair, she was relegated to sailing lighter in Portsmouth and in 1885 was scrapped by Castle & Sons, London. [Union-Castle Line by P. Newall, contains reproduction picture of the ship]

BRITON 1897
Off. No.106919, 10,248 gross tons, length 530.3ft x beam 60.3ft, two funnels, three masts, speed 17.5 knots, accommodation for 280-1st, 182-2nd and 122-3rd class passengers. Launched on 5th Jun.1897 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast (Yard No.313) for the Union SS Co and completed in Nov.1897 she arrived at Capetown on her maiden voyage on 21st Dec. At the time, she was the largest liner running between Britain and South Africa. In Jun.1898 she ran aground briefly on the Shambles, off Portland Bill, Dorset but was refloated. Oct.1899 carried 1,500 troops to Capetown in less then 15 days at the beginning of the Boer War. 1900 transferred to ownership of the newly formed Union-Castle Mail SS Co. 11th Aug. to 25th Sep.1914 requisitioned as a troopship, then returned to commercial service. 16th Dec.1915 requisitioned as troopship, mainly on Mediterranean service. 1918 carried Nigerian troops from Mombasa to Lagos. Later carried U.S. troops between Liverpool and the USA. 1919 on New Zealand route. 1920 returned to commercial service. Jan.1925 laid up at Netley. Oct.1925 made final voyage to Capetown during the seamen's strike. May 1926 arrived at La Spezia for scrapping. [Union-Castle Line by Peter Newell]

BRODNESS 1894 - see BANFFSHIRE

BROOKLYN / CITY OF BROOKLYN 1868
was a 2,911 gross ton ship, length 354.4ft x beam 42.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, she was launched as the CITY OF BROOKLYN in Dec.1868 for the Inman Line. Used on the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service until 1878 when she was sold to the Dominion Line and renamed BROOKLYN. he started the first of two Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyages on 4th Sep.1878 and was then lengthened to 399.8ft with a tonnage of 4,215 tons and fitted with new engines. She resumed Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 25th Jun.1879 and was wrecked on Anticosti Island on 8th Nov.1885 with no loss of life.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.805]

BROOKLYN 1905 see BRITISH QUEEN 1880

BRUENN 1908
3,905 gross tons, length 356.3ft x beam 42.3ft, single screw, speed 13½ knots, passenger / cargo ship. Built 1908 by Lloyd Austriaco, Trieste for their own shipping company, she transferred to Lloyd Triestino, Trieste in 1919 when Trieste came under Italian rule. 1921 renamed CELIO, 1937 transferred to Adriatica Soc. Anon. di Nav., Venice. 1940 transferred to Tirrenia Soc. Anon. di Nav., Venice. 24th Jul.1940 mined and sunk 3½ miles off the Libyan coast on voyage Derna to Benghazi.

BUCKEYE STATE / PRESIDENT TAFT / GENERAL WILLARD A. HOLBROOK 1921
The PRESIDENT TAFT was built by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Sparrows Point, Maryland as the BUCKEYE STATE in 1921. She was a 14,124 gross ton ship, length 535ft x beam 72ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. Built for the United States Shipping Board, she was assigned to Pacific Mail, renamed PRESIDENT TAFT in 1922 and commenced sailings between San Francisco and the Orient on 12th Sept.1922. In 1925 she was bought by the Dollar Line and started her first San Francisco - Orient sailing for her new owners on 27th June 1925. In 1938 she was transferred to the American President Lines and in June 1941 was converted to an army transport and renamed GENERAL WILLARD A. HOLBROOK. In Nov 1949 she was laid up in the James River and eventually scrapped in 1957. [Pacific Liners, 1927-72 by Frederick Emmons]

BUENOS AYREAN 1880
The BUENOS AYREAN was an Allan Line vessel. Built in 1880 by Wm.Denny & Bros, Dumbarton, Scotland, she was a 4,005 gross ton vessel. Length 385.2ft x beam 42.2ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots.  She had accommodation for 1st and 3rd class passengers and was the first steel built North Atlantic steamer. Launched on 2nd Oct.1879, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to South America on 1st Dec.1879. On 31st Mar.1880 she commenced her first voyage from Glasgow to Halifax and Boston, and on 12th May 1880 started running between Glasgow, Quebec and Montreal. Between 1880 - 1895 she carried out one round voyage annually between Glasgow and S.America. In 1896, she was fitted with quadruple expansion engines and her masts reduced to two and on 30th Sep.1896 resumed the Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal service. On 12th Feb.1902 commenced a Glasgow - Philadelphia service and on 1st Jul.1902 a Glasgow - Boston service. She commenced her last voyage from Glasgow to Portland on 9th Jan.1909 and was then laid up at Gareloch. She was scrapped at Falmouth in 1911.

BULAWAYO 1895
Owned by Bucknalls - which in 1908 became managed by the Ellerman group of companies and in 1914 became part of the group and the name was changed to Ellerman & Bucknall SS Co.Ltd. The company entered the passenger business between the UK and South Africa in 1895 with the sister ships JOHANNESBURG, FORT SALISBURY and BULAWAYO. The ships were about 4,000 gross tons with good cargo carrying capacity and accommodation for about 60 passengers. Fares varied between £24 - £28 (UKP) according to the position and size of the cabins. The ships soon gained an excellent reputation for comfort and the excellence of their victualling. Originally the run was from London to the Cape direct, but was later extended to India and back to London via Suez. Within a short time however, the service became so popular that the ships took the direct route to the Cape both outwards and homewards. In 1912 the three ships were sold and the service was taken over by ships of the City and Hall Lines. [Sea Breezes Magazine, March 1953]

BULGARIA / CANADA / HERCULES / PHILIPPINES 1898
10,237 tons, length 500ft x beam 62ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. Accommodation for 300-2nd and 2,400-3rd class passengers. Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1898 for Hamburg America Line, she sailed between Hamburg, Halifax and New York. In 1899 she encountered a severe hurricane, her hatches were stove in and her rudder carried away. Over 100 injured horses were slaughtered and thrown overboard, and the passengers were taken off by three British steamers. After three weeks, a jury rudder was rigged and she managed to reach Punta Delgada in the Azores. Her last voyage was from Hamburg to Boston and Baltimore in Feb.1913 and she then transferred to Unione Austriaca who renamed her CANADA. After two Trieste - Quebec - Montreal sailings, she reverted to Hamburg America Line and her original name. She resumed Hamburg - Boston - Baltimore sailings in Dec.1913 and made her last crossing in July 1914. Seized by the USA in Apr.1917, she was renamed HERCULES and operated for the US Government. Transferred to the US Shipping Board in 1919 and renamed PHILIPPINES, she was scrapped in 1924. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1]

BULIMBA 1881
The BULIMBA was built in 1881 by A&J.Inglis, Glasgow, and was a 2,510 gross ton ship, length 96,26m x beam 11,64m (315.8ft x 38.2ft), one funnel, two masts, single screw. There was accommodation for 37-1st amd 16-2nd class passengers. She could also carry 1,360 deck passengers. Launched for A.Gray & E.S.Dawes, she was operated by Associated Steamers for the London - Brisbane service. She started her maiden voyage from London, via Suez and Batavia to Brisbane on 1/1/1883, and in 1886 was registered as belonging to British India Associated Steamers. In 1890 she was transferred to Australasian United S.N.Co and started her last voyage between London and Brisbane on 17/2/1891. In 1899 she was again transferred to British India Steam Navigation Co and used on the Bombay - Persian Gulf service. She was hulked at Singapore in 1910 and in September 1914 was re-commisioned after the outbreak of the Great War. In December 1922 she was sold to Eng Hup, China and was scrapped the following year at Shanghai.
[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.11, British India S.N.Co] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

BULOW / TRAS-OS-MONTES / NYASSA 1906
Built 1906 as the 9,028 gross ton ship BULOW for North German Lloyd, Bremen. Dimensions - length 462.4ft x beam 57.6ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots. Accommodation for 108-1st, 106-2nd and 1,828-3rd class passengers. Launched by J.C.Tecklenborg,  Geestemunde on 21st Apr.1906, she started the first of 18 Bremen - Far East voyages on 26th Sep.1906. On 23rd Jan.1907 she commenced her first of three Australia sailings and on 11th Jan.1908 started her first New York voyage. Here fifth and last voyage on this service started on 25th Jan.1913 and on 23rd Jul.1914 she sailed for the Far East but took refuge in Portugal on the outbreak of the Great War. Seized by Portugal in 1916, she was renamed TRAS-OS-MONTES and in 1922 was laid up at Lisbon. Sold to Companhia Nacional de Navegaceo in 1924, she was renamed NYASSA and used mostly on the South America service. Between 1940-1944 she made 14 round voyages between Lisbon, New York, Baltimore or Philadelphia as well as South American voyages. Laid up at Lisbon in Nov.1949, she was scrapped at Blyth in 1951. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.568; vol.4,p.1669] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

BYRON / VASILEFS CONSTANTINOS / MEGALI HELLAS 1914
The BYRON was built for the National Greek Line as the VASILEFS CONSTANTINOS in 1914. She then became the MEGALI HELLAS in 1919 and went to the Byron Steamship Co in 1923 and was renamed BYRON. Her first voyage for these owners started 4th Aug.1923 when she left Constanza for Constantinople, Piraeus, Patras and New York so she was comparitively new for these owners in March 1924. Her last sailing was on 25th Jul.1928 from Piraeus to Patras and New York.

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