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SHIP DESCRIPTIONS - C

C Descriptions C/CA to CH | CI to CZ

Please note that ships often changed hands and names many times. If an entry is just the name of the vessel followed by a "see..." then that vessel was renamed and you will find the full history under the redirected name.

CIMBRIA 1867
3,037 gross tons, length 339.9ft x beam 40ft, one funnel, two masts(rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation for 58-1st, 120-2nd and 500-3rd class passengers. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock and launched for the Hamburg America Line on 21st Jan.1867. Maiden voyage from Hamburg to Southampton and New York started on 13th Apr.1867. On 17th Jan.1883 she sailed from Hamburg for New York, but on 19th Jan, was in collision with the British SS SULTAN near Borkum Island, Germany and sank with the loss of 389 lives.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.389]

CINCINNATI / COVINGTON 1908
This was the CINCINNATI of the Hamburg America Line, built by F.Schichau, Danzig in 1908. She was a 16,339 gross ton vessel, length 582.3ft x beam 65.4ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 243-1st, 210-2nd, 484-3rd and 1,821-4th class passengers. Launched on 24/7/1908, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Southampton, Cherbourg and New York on 27/5/1909. On 4/4/1910 she commenced her first voyage from Genoa to Naples and New York (winter service) and commenced her last sailing on this route on 2/4/1913. On 21/5/1913 she commenced sailing between Hamburg, Boulogne, Southampton and Boston, and made her last sailing on this service on 28/7/1914. In April 1917 she was seized by the USA at Boston and became the US government ship COVINGTON. On 1/7/1918 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.86 near the French coast. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.414]

CIRCASSIA 1878
The CIRCASSIA was built by Barrow Shipbuilding Co, Barrow in 1878 for the Anchor Line. She was a 4,272 gross ton ship, length 399.7ft x beam 42 ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 200-1st, 100-2nd and 800-3rd class. She was the first North Atlantic liner to have refrigerated space for meat and could carry 400 tons. Launched on 19th Mar.1878, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville (N.Ireland) and New York on 1st Jun.1878. She started her last voyage on 12th Aug.1897 when she left Glasgow for Moville, New York and Glasgow and was then laid up. In 1900 she was scrapped in Germany. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.461] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line]

CIRCASSIAN 1857
The CIRCASSIAN of 1857 was built by Robert Hickson & Co, Belfast (engines by Randolph, Elder & Co, Glasgow) for the British owned North Atlantic Steam Navigation Co. She was a 1,387 gross ton ship, length 255ft x beam 39.1ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. There was cabin class, intermediate and 3rd class accommodation. Launched on 18th Jul.1856, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage with 200 passengers on 7th Mar.1857, but had to put back to Liverpool on 14th March after meeting a succession of terrific gales. She sailed again on 19th March for St John's NF, Halifax and Portland. She made three round voyages on this service, the last starting 11th Jul.1857, and in Sept.1857 was taken over for use as an Indian Mutiny transport. On 26th Oct.1858, she started her first voyage under charter to the Galway Line, between Galway and New York and commenced her eighth and last sailing on this route on 5th Mar.1860. In May 1862 she was captured by the USS SOMERSET while blockade running and was transferred to the US flag. Her first voyage from New York to Southampton and Bremen (Ruger Bros, agents) started on 19th Aug.1865 and on 20th Oct.1865 she ran aground at Arichet, Cape Breton Island. Refloated, she arrived in New York on 20th Nov. Chartered to Continental Mail SS Co., she left New York on 18th Jul.1866 for Antwerp and made a second voyage on this route, starting 2th Oct.1866. She was then chartered to Ruger Bros, New York and sailed from New York on 2nd Aug.1867 for Bremen, Falmouth and New York. On 25th Apr.1868 she left New York for Bremen under charter to Ruger's Atlantic Line and commenced her second and last sailing on this route on 25th Jul.1868. In 1874, her engines were removed and in 1876 she was wrecked, with no loss of life at Bridgehampton, Long Island. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.489]

CIRCASSIAN 1873
The Allan Line CIRCASSIAN was an iron vessel built in 1872 by R. Steele & Co. of Greenock. Her dimensions were 3211 gross tons, length 375.5ft x beam 40.3ft. clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, single screw, speed 13 knots. Accommodation for 100 1st class and 850 3rd class passengers. She was damaged by fire while fitting out and was not delivered to Allan Line until 1873 when she made her maiden voyage from Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal on 24.4.1873. Last voyage Liverpool - Portland 3.12.1874. In 1875 she was lengthened to 415.5ft and re-engined at Birkenhead, becoming 3724 tons. On 20.1.1876. she resumed the Liverpool - Portland run and made her last voyage 11.5.1893 from Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal. Scrapped in 1896. There is a lot of information on the Allan Line in North Atlantic Seaway Vol.1. by N.R.P.Bonsor.

CITTA DI MILANO / ALBANIA 1897
The CITTA DI MILANO was a 4,041 gross ton ship built by N.Odero fu Alessandro & Co, Sestri Ponenti, Genoa in 1897 for La Veloce of Genoa. Her dimensions were - length 364ft x beam 43.6ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 40-2nd and 1,290-3rd class passengers. Launched on 17/12/1897, she commenced her maiden voyage on 30/12/1897 when she sailed from Genoa for Montevideo, Buenos Aires and Rosario. She stayed on the S.American service until 3/2/1902 when she transferred to the Genoa - Naples - New York route, completing 26 round voyages on this service. In 1908 she went to the Genoa - La Guaira - Colon service and in 1914 was sold to the Sitmar Line and renamed ALBANIA. In 1932 she went to Lloyd Triestino and was scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3 ,p.1271] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, p.281] There is a picture of this ship in South Atlantic Seaway p.274

CITTA DI NAPOLI / REPUBLIC / MAASDAM / VITTORIA 1871
The CITTA DI NAPOLI was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1871 as the REPUBLIC for the White Star Line. She was a 3,984 gross ton ship, length 420ft x beam 40.9ft, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 166-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4th Jul.1871, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown and New York on 1st Feb.1872. Her last voyage on this service commenced 16th Jan.1889 and she was then sold to Holland America Line and renamed MAASDAM. Re-engined by G.Forrester & Co, Liverpool, and refitted to carry 150-1st, 60-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers, she started Rotterdam - New York sailings on 15th Mar.1890. In 1899 she was again refitted to accommodate 2nd and 3rd class passengers only, and on 6th Mar.1902 commenced her last voyage between Rotterdam, Boulogne and New York. In 1902 she went to Italian owners and was renamed VITTORIA and later the same year was sold to La Veloce of Genoa and renamed CITTA DI NAPOLI. Refitted to carry 1,424-3rd class passengers, she started sailings between Genoa, Naples and New York on 30th Sep.1902. Her thirtieth and last voyage on this route commenced 27th Apr.1907 and she was sold in 1908 and scrapped at Genoa in 1910. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.2, p.756]

CITTA DI NEW YORK / TEST / CAXTON / MENDOTA / ANGIOLINA / COSTANZA 1883
2,624 gross ton ship, length 310.6ft x beam 38.8ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Built by Oswald, Mourdant & Co, Southampton, she was launched in July 1883 as the TEST for T.R.Oswald & Co., Liverpool. In 1885 she was purchased by Lamport and Holt Line, renamed CAXTON and used on the UK to South America service. Sold to Mendota SS Co., Liverpool in 1895, she was renamed MENDOTA and in 1900 went to C. Parodi, Genoa and named ANGIOLINA. In 1905 she was renamed CITTA DI NEW YORK and was purchased by Vincenzo Finizio and started her first Genoa - Naples - New York voyage on 16th Mar.1905. Her third and last voyage was from Naples to Messina, Palermo and New York and she was sold in 1907 and again renamed as COSTANZA. On 14th Aug.1917 she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine in the North Sea.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1281] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.34 Lamport & Holt Line]

CITTA DI SPEZIA 1929
2,474 gross ton passenger / cargo ship, length 288.6ft x beam 40.1ft, single screw, speed 12 knots. Built 1929 by Cant. ed Officine Meridionali Baia for "Florio" Soc. Italiana di Navigazione, Palermo. 1932 transferred to "Tirrenia" (Flotte Reunite Florio-Citra), Palermo. 1937 owners became "Tirrenia" Soc. Anon. di Nav, Palermo. 27th Aug.1943 torpedoed and sunk by British submarine HMS UNRUFFLED while 40 miles from Brindisi on voyage Brindisi to Valona.

CITY OF AGRA 1936
6361 g.t., 459.9ft x 56.2ft, single screw, speed 13.5 knots. Launched 2nd Oct.1936 by Wm. Denny & Bros, Dumbarton for Ellerman's Hall Line. Her holds were clear of stanchions for the carriage of bulky cargoes. Mostly used on the Liverpool - India - Burma or Liverpool - South and East Africa / Mauritius services.10th May 1965 sold to Dutch interests, but re-sold and scrapped at Bilbao.

CITY OF ANTWERP / THANEMORE 1866
The CITY OF ANTWERP was built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow in 1866 for the Inman Line of Liverpool. She was a 2,391 gross ton ship, length 332ft x beam 39.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 8th Nov.1866, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 20th Feb.1867. She continued on this service until starting her last voyage on 13th Jan.1876. Sold to the Johnston Line in 1879, she was renamed THANEMORE, re-engined and rebuilt to 3,032 gross tons. On 26th Nov.1890 she went missing with the loss of 43 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.242]

CITY OF ATHENS / CANTIGNY / AMERICAN BANKER / VILLE D'ANVERS / PROTEUS /AROSA KULM 1919
The CITY OF ATHENS was built in 1919 by the American International Shipbuilding Corporation, Hog Island, Penn. She was a 7,430 gross ton ship, length overall 448ft x beam 58.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 17 knots. Originally launched on 27 Oct. 1919 as the US Army Transport CANTIGNY, she went to the American Merchant Line in 1924 and was renamed AMERICAN BANKER with accommodation for 12 tourist class passengers. On 24 April 1924 she commenced her first voyage from New York to London and in 1926 her accommodation was altered to carry 80 tourist passengers. In 1931 she went to the United States Line and on 6 Nov. 1931 started her first sailing from New York to Plymouth and London. On 8 Oct. 1939 she commenced her last round voyage New York - London (dep 25 Oct.) - New York (arr 4 Nov.) . In 1940 she went to the French company, Societe Maritime Anversoise who renamed her VILLE D'ANVERS and on 9 March 1940 she started her first voyage from New York to Liverpool. In 1945 she went back to the United States Line and in 1946 went to the Isbrandsten Line. Later the same year she was sold to the Compania de Vapores Mediterranea, Honduras, her accommodation altered to carry 200 single class passengers and renamed CITY OF ATHENS but was chartered to the Stevenson Line of Honduras and sailed from New York to Istanbul on 11 Nov. 1946. She made two more voyages on this service on 23 Jan. 1947 and 3 April 1947 and on 30 May 1947 commenced her 4th voyage for this company when she sailed from New York for Genoa, Piraeus, and Baltimore (arr 12 July). On 12 August 1947 she was sold by auction at Baltimore and was bought by the Panamian Lines, renamed PROTEUS and rebuilt from Oct'47-Apr'48 at Genoa. She then became a 8,929 ton ship with accommodation for 965 single class passengers, and from May 1948-July 1951 she ran for the Panamanian Lines and later Compania de Operaziones Maritima, Italy. During this period she made 4 round voyages to Australia, one voyage Italy - Brazil, one Italy - Central America, 5 from Italy - South America, 2 Gdynia - Haifa, and 3 Italy - Australia. In August 1951 she went to Compania Internacional Transportadora (Arosa Line) of Panama and made one round voyage from Marseilles to Indochina and Italy before being chartered to the Incres Line of Panama. She commenced her first voyage for this company from Havre to Plymouth and St John NB on 10/12/1951 and started her last run on 10 dec. 1951 from Havre to Plymouth, St John NB and Bremen(arr 4 Jan. 1952). She then went back to the Arosa Line and was renamed AROSA KULM. On 18/3/1952 she commenced her first voyage from Bremen to Zeebrugge, Southampton and Halifax and in April 1952 made her first sailing from Bremen to Quebec and Montreal. Her final voyage commenced on 5 Sept. 1958 when she sailed from New York for Bremen and on 6 Dec. 1958 she was arrested for debt at Plymouth. She arrived at Bruges on 7 May 1959 and was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1549] There is a picture of this vessel in North Atlantic Seaway, vol.4, p.1713.

CITY OF BALTIMORE / FIVALLER / BENICARLO 1855
The CITY OF BALTIMORE was built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow in 1855 for the British owned Inman Line. She was a 2,368 gross ton ship, length 330.7ft x beam 39ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 20th January 1855, she sailed from Liverpool for Marseilles on 20th March, where she was charterd by the French government for use as a troop transport for the Crimean War. She commenced her first commercial voyage for the Inman Line from Liverpool to Philadelphia on 23rd April 1856 and her first Liverpool - New York voyage started on 14th Jan.1857. In 1866 she was reconditioned with new engines and boilers and resumed Liverpool - Queenstown (Cobh) - New York voyages on 21st Nov.1866. Her last sailing on this service commenced 26th Feb.1874 and she was then sold to the Hall Line, retaining the same name. In 1883 she was sold to Spanish owners and renamed FIVALLER and in 1886 became the Spanish owned BENICARLO. She was scrapped the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.239; vol.5,p.1920]

CITY OF BARODA 1918
This was a 7,129 gross ton ship, built by Barclay, Curle & Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1918 for Ellerman's American & Indian Line. Her details were - length 433.4ft x beam 57.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 115-1st class passengers. Launched on 26/6/1918, she was employed on various routes, but on 3/2/1927 commenced her first passenger voyage from New York to Port Said, Karachi, Bombay, Columbo, Madras, Rangoon, and Calcutta. In November 1929 she commenced the last of two voyages from New York to Port Said and Far East ports and on 2/4/1943 was torpedoed and sunk off Luderitz Bay by the German submarine U.509 with the loss of 14 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1474]

CITY OF BENARES 1902
6.984 gross tons, length 460.5ft x beam 55.3ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 11½ knots, accommodation for 44-1st and 44-2nd class passengers.
Built 1902 by Workman, Clark & Co., Belfast for Ellerman City Lines Ltd which sailed mostly UK to India and South Africa. In Aug.1914 she became a troopship for the British Expeditionary Force sailing to France and in Jan.1919 was returned to her owners. Used then on Ellerman's American Indian Line service from New York via Capetown to Calcutta. In 1927 she transferred to Ellerman's American & Manchurian Line sailing New York - Philippines - China - Japan - Dairen. Feb.1933 scrapped at Blyth.

CITY OF BENARES 1936
The Ellerman Liner CITY OF BENARES which was sailing from Liverpool to Montreal with 209 crew, 6 convoy staff and 191 passengers (including 90 children evacuees). She was the commodore ship of an 8 knot convoy and although capable of 15 knots, had to keep her speed down to that of the slowest ship in the convoy. In the early hours of 17th Sep.1940 the escort ships left the convoy at the extremity of their steaming range and the merchant ships proceeded unescorted. At 2205 hours she was torpedoed by the German submarine U.48 in heavy weather and darkness and the ship was abandoned. Several of the lifeboats were swamped by waves and 248 lives were lost including 77 children and 5 escorts. The following day 105 were rescued from rafts and lifeboats by HMS HURRICANE of whom, 5 later died. On 25th Sept, a Sunderland flying boat sighted a lifeboat, radioed for assistance and dropped food. At 1700 hrs, HMS ANTHONY rescued 45 survivors including 6 children. The survivors totalled 145 (88 crew and 57 passengers of whom 13 were children). After this, the evacuation of children by sea ceased.[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.16, Ellerman Lines]

CITY OF BERLIN / BERLIN / MEADE 1875
The CITY OF BERLIN was a 5,491 gross ton ship, length 488.6ft x beam 44.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a service speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 170-1st, 100-2nd and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock, she was launched for the Inman Line of Liverpool on 27th Oct.1874. Her maiden voyage started on 29th Apr.1875 when she sailed from Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She made several record passages, her best being 7days 15hrs 28mins between Sandy Hook and Queenstown at an average speed of 15.37 knots. In 1879 she was fitted with the first interior electric light on the North Atlantic, with four lamps in the cabin class saloon and two in steerage. Re-engined with triple-expansion engines in 1887 and the accommodation rebuilt with electric light throughout. Her last voyage for Inman Line started on 1st Mar.1893 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown and New York. Sold to the American Line, but sailed under the British flag, she was renamed BERLIN in 1893. Her first New York - Southampton sailing started 18th Mar.1893 and her last Southampton - New York crossing commenced 3rd Aug.1895. On 31st Aug.1895 she started her first Antwerp - New York sailing for the Red Star Line and commenced her seventh and last voyage on this service on 16th Apr.1898. She then resumed Southampton - Queenstown - New York on 28th May 1898 and made one further sailing on this route on 25th Jun.1898. Sold to the US Government in 1898, she was renamed MEADE, was damaged by fire at San Francisco in Jan.1906 and was scrapped in 1921.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.243]

CITY OF BOMBAY 1885
4492 gross tons, length 404ft x beam 48ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw, speed 13.5 knots. Accommodation for 80 saloon class passengers. Built by Workman, Clark & Co, Belfast, she was delivered to George Smith & Sons (City Line), Glasgow in Aug.1885 and was used generally in the India trade. In Aug.1901 the company was taken over by John Ellerman. The ship made three voyages between Glasgow, Liverpool and Philadelphia in 1903 under charter to the Allan Line, and repeated this in the summers of 1906 and 1907. In 1904 she was chartered by Lunn & Co, London to carry Russian troops from Odessa to Vladivostok for the Russo-Japanese War. Scrapped in Holland in May 1908.[Merchant Fleets vol.16, Ellerman Lines by D. Haws]

CITY OF BOSTON 1864
Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow in 1864, she was a 2,278 gross ton ship, length 305ft x beam 39ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommmodation for 100-cabin and 950-3rd class passengers. Launched on 15th Nov.1864 for the Inman Line of Liverpool, she started her maiden voyage on 8th Feb.1865 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She sailed from New York for Liverpool on 25th Jan.1870 and went missing with the loss of 177 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.241]

CITY OF BRADFORD 1903
O.N.118913 1,341 g.t. passenger / cargo ship, 256.5ft x 34.5ft, single screw, speed 14 knots, capacity for 50-cabin and 250-deck passengers, built 1903 by Earle's SB & Eng. Co., Hull for the Great Central Railway, Grimsby. Launched on 23rd July 1903 she made her maiden voyage from Grimsby to Rotterdam in Sept. and then traded to Norway and Sweden to maintain the company's rights on these routes. Thereafter she was used on the Hamburg service. 27th July 1907 collided with the s/s HARTLEY in the Elbe. 3rd Aug.1914 left Grimsby for Hamburg but being without radio was unaware of the outbreak of war and was seized by German Naval units off Heligoland. 1915 renamed DONAU for the Imperial German Navy and converted to a floating workshop. 1916 used as a depot ship in the Baltic to the 1st Patrol Half-Flotilla and in 1917 took part in the capture of Oesal Island off Riga. 20th Jan.1919 recovered by the British, towed to Grimsby and returned to her owners. 1st Jan.1923 transferred to London & North Eastern Railway on the amalgamation of the railway companies. May 1935 transferred to Associated Humber Lines, but not required and put up for sale. Sep.1936 sold for 5,500 UKP to Near East Shipping Co., London and renamed HANNE. 22nd Feb.1942 bombed and sunk by German aircraft off Malta in position 31.57N 25.26E. [Merchant Fleets, vol.25 by Duncan Haws]

CITY OF BROOKLYN / BROOKLYN 1868
The BROOKLYN was a 2,911 gross ton ship, length 354.4ft x beam 42.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, she was launched as the CITY OF BROOKLYN in Dec.1868 for the Inman Line. Used on the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service until 1878 when she was sold to the Dominion Line and renamed BROOKLYN. he started the first of two Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyages on 4th Sep.1878 and was then lengthened to 399.8ft with a tonnage of 4,215 tons and fitted with new engines. She resumed Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 25th Jun.1879 and was wrecked on Anticosti Island on 8th Nov.1885 with no loss of life.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.805]

CITY OF BRUSSELS 1869
The CITY OF BRUSSELS was built in 1869 by Tod & McGregor of Glagow for the Inman Line of Liverpool. Her details were - 3,081 gross tons, length 390ft x beam 40.3ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. She had accommodation for 200-cabin and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 10th Aug.1869, she left Liverpool on 14th Oct.1869 on her maiden voyage to Queenstown(Cobh) and New York. In Dec.1869 she made a record passage between New York and Queenstown and on 9th Nov.1871 commenced her last voyage on the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service before being rebuilt. In 1872 she had an iron promenade deck added, her tonnage increased to 3,747 tons, and her steerage accommodation increased to 1,000 passengers. From 9th May 1872 she resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service until starting her last run on 26th Aug.1875 and she was fitted with compound engines in 1876. On 28th Feb.1877 she once again resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York route until 12th Dec.1882 she sailed on her last voyage and on 7th Jan.1883 sank in the River Mersey following collision with the British steamer KIRBY HALL with the loss of 10 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.242]

CITY OF CHESTER / CHESTER / SEDGEWICK / ARIZONA / NAPOLETANO 1873
The CITY OF CHESTER was a 4,566 gross ton ship, built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1873 for the Inman Line of Liverpool. Her details were - length 444.6ft x beam 44.2ft, clipper stem, two funnels, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw, two cylinder compound engine, and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 125-1st, 80-2nd and 1,310-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29th Mar.1873, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 10th Jul.1873. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 15th Feb.1893 and then went to the American Line, but stayed under the British flag, and was renamed CHESTER. On 4th Mar.1893 she started her first New York - Southampton crossing and on 4th Nov.1894 commenced her last Southampton - New York voyage. She resumed the Southampton -Queenstown - New York service on 14th May 1898 and started her third and final voyage on this route on 9th Jul.1898. She then became the US Army Transport SEDGEWICK. In 1903 she was sold to Italian owners who renamed her ARIZONA and in 1906 she became the Italian NAPOLETANO. She was scrapped in 1907. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.243]

CITY OF CHICAGO 1883
The CITY OF CHICAGO was a 5,202 gross ton ship, length 430.6ft x beam 45ft, two funnels, four masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 140-1st, 100-2nd and 850-3rd class passengers. Built by Charles Connell & Co, Glasgow, she was laid down as the VANCOUVER for the Dominion Line but was purchased while building and launched on 23rd May 1883 as the CITY OF CHICAGO for the Inman Line. On 18th Sep.1883 she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York and commenced her last voyage on 8th Jun.1892. On 1st Jul.1892 she was wrecked near the Old Head of Kinsale, Ireland with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.244]

CITY OF COLOMBO 1909
5,598 gross tons, length 425.1ft x beam 54.1ft, single screw, speed 11 knots, cargo steamer built 1909 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Newcastle for Ellerman's Hall Line. 1st Aug.1917 beat off an attack by U.155 while going to the assistance of a sailing vessel. 4th Aug. again attacked, probably by the same submarine but escaped in the dark. Oct.1918 came under Ellerman's City Line management. March 1921 wrecked on the coast of Nova Scotia.

CITY OF CORK / MEDITERRANEO 1862
Built in 1862 by Wm Denny & Brothers, Dumbarton for the Inman Line of Liverpool. Her details were - 1,547 gross tons, Length 252.6ft x beam 32.8ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. She was rigged for sail as well as steam. There was accommodation for 20-cabin class passengers as well as 3rd class. She was launched on 22/11/1862 without a name and was bought by Inman in 1863 and named CITY OF CORK. She started her maiden voyage Liverpool - Queenstown(Cobh) - New York on 21/3/1863. Commenced her last voyage Liverpool - Queenstown - Halifax - New York voyage on 14/1/1871 and was then sold to the Florio Line of Italy who renamed her MEDITERRANEO. In 1881 she went to Navigazione Generale Italiana who ran her until 1899 when she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.240]

CITY OF COVENTRY 1949
7,568 gross tons, length 485.3ft x beam 61.8ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 14 knots. Completed May 1949 by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Wallsend for Ellerman's Hall Line. 1967 sold to Austin Nav. Corp, Liberia renamed INGRID. 1969 sold to Outerocean Nav. Corp, Keelung renamed ANNIE. 27th Apr.1970 left Yokohama and scrapped at Kaohsing, Taiwan.

CITY OF DELHI / MARGARITA 1901
Built by Barclay, Curle & Co, Glasgow for Ellerman's City Line, she was 4,443 gross tons, 2,826 nett tons, length 385.5ft x beam 48.7ft, single screw, speed 10 knots. 27th Aug.1923 sold to N. G. Metaxas, Cephalonia, Greece and renamed MARGARITA. On 7th Oct.1925 she left East London, South Africa for Dakar. The following day she sent a distress call reporting a heavy list in heavy weather. Nothing more was heard of the ship or her 36 crew.

CITY OF EDINBURGH 1938
8,036 g.t., built 1938 by Cammel, Laird & Co., Birkenhead for Ellerman City Line. Employed on the USA - Australia - New Zealand route until 1939. 1941 caught fire at Takoradi and towed to sea to avoid blocking the port if capsized, but fire extinguished and repaired. Nov.1942 took part in convoy KMF4 carrying troops for Operation Torch (Invasion of North Africa). Sep.1943 taken over by Admiralty and converted to Landing Ship Headquarters for Pacific operations. July 1944 renamed HMS LOTHIAN and sent to join the U.S 6th fleet as part of Force X. On 3rd Aug.1944 she left the Clyde for the Pacific via New York & Panama. Instead of 450, there were 750 aboard under the command of Rear Admiral A. G. Talbot, all in very cramped conditions with insufficient ventilation or water. On 1st Sep. while docked at Balboa, an armed mutiny occurred and Royal Marines were used to quell the mutiny. This was the only armed mutiny in the Royal Navy since the 19th century. As there were no relief seamen available and nowhere to jail the mutineers, their sentences were suspended and the ship proceeded. On 29th Sept., HMS LOTHIAN joined the U.S.6th fleet at New Guinea but the Americans took no interest in the British force and after aimlessly sailing around the islands, she was sent to Sydney. In Feb.1945 she became flagship to Rear Admiral D. B. Fisher and her duties were to control the transports arriving to supply the British Pacific Fleet. In Sep, after the Pacific War ceased, she was used to evacuate civilians and prisoners of the Japanese from Singapore, Hong Kong and Shanghai. 1946 returned to Ellerman Line and reverted to CITY OF EDINBURGH. 1947 transferred to Ellerman & Bucknall ownership. Apr.1961 sold to Hong Kong Salvage and Towage Co. and renamed CASTLE MOUNT for her last voyage to Hong Kong where she was scrapped the same year.

CITY OF GLASGOW 1850
1,609 gross tons, length 227ft x beam 34ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. There was accommodation for 52-1st and 85-2nd class passengers. Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, she was launched on 28th Feb.1850 and was placed on the Glasgow - New York service on their own account. She started her maiden voyage on 15th Apr.1850 when she left Glasgow for New York and commenced her fourth and last voyage on this service on 5th Oct.1850. She was then purchased by the Inman Line and commenced Liverpool - Philadelphia sailings on 11th Dec.1850. In 1852 her passenger accommodation was increased to 130-cabin and 400-3rd class. On 1st Jan.1854 she sailed from Liverpool and went missing with the loss of 480 passengers and crew. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.238]

CITY OF HAMBURG 1918
8,424 gross tons, length 486.5ft x beam 56.0ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 16 knots. Accommodation for 81-tourist class passengers. Built 1918 by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp, Alameda, Cal. as the U.S. Transport ECLIPSE. 1931 purchased by Baltimore Mail Steamship Co. and renamed CITY OF HAMBURG. 1st Oct.1931 first voyage Baltimore - Norfolk - Havre - Hamburg. 26th May 1938 last voyage of the shipping line on the same route. 1938 transferred to Panama Pacific Line, renamed CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO. 1940 transferred to U.S. Navy and renamed WILLIAM P. BIDDLE. 1957 scrapped.
An unfortunate ship - In Jan.1936 she lay disabled at St. John's, Newfoundland with a damaged rudder and the CITY OF BALTIMORE had to make a special detour to take off her passengers. On 21st Dec.1937 she was in collision with the Italian steamer CONFIDENZA in the North Sea in fog and radioed that she was "sinking fast". In fact she was able to reach Cuxhaven where she was repaired. On 18th Mar.1938 she stranded in Chesapeake Bay, again in fog.

CITY OF LIMERICK 1863 see AFRICAN 1855

CITY OF LONDON 1863
Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow in 1863 for the Inman Line of Liverpool. This was a 2,560 gross ton ship, length 336ft x beam 40.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched in 1863, she started her maiden voyage on 8th July 1863 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. She started her last voyage on this route on 8th July 1869 before being rebuilt to a length of 374ft, 2,765 gross tons and fitted with new engines. She resumed Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailings on 4th Nov.1869 and commenced her last sailing on 25th Feb.1875. Sold to the Thistle Line in 1878, she was re-engined and commenced London - New York voyages on 22nd July 1879. On 13th Nov.1881 she left London for New York and went missing with the loss of 41 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.241]

CITY OF LONDON / HONG BEE 1876
The CITY OF LONDON was built by Connell's, Glasgow in 1876 for George Smith's City Line. She was a 3,212 gross ton, 11 knot, iron built steamer. She sailed to the Far East and also made one or more voyages to Australia for the Orient Line. In 1901 she was sold to Lim Ho Puah, Singapore and renamed HONG BEE. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

CITY OF LONDON 1907
8,815 tons, length 506ft x beam 57.8ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, 15 knots. Accommodation for 272-1st and 64-2nd class. Built 1907 by Workman, Clarke, Belfast for Ellerman City Line. Used on Bombay - London service, 1916 converted to Armed Merchant Cruiser, 1919 rebuilt to 8,956 tons, 231-1st and 64-2nd class passengers, July 1919 resumed India service. 1931-1935 used on South African service of Ellerman & Bucknall Line, 1935 returned to India service, 1939 converted to troopship, 1946 scrapped.

CITY OF LUCKNOW / HELUAN 1908
7,248 tons, length 441.5ft x beam 52.7ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, 12 knots, 89-1st and 28-2nd class passengers. Built by A. Reiherstieg, Hamburg 1908 as the HELUAN for Deutsche DG Kosmos, Hamburg and acquired by Ellerman's (probably as war reparations) in 1920 and renamed CITY OF LUCKNOW. Actually owned by City of Oran SS Co with Ellerman City Line Ltd as managers. In Oct.1921 she was placed on Ellerman & Bucknall Line's American and Indian Line service between New York and India. 1926 sold to Hamburg America Line renamed HELUAN, placed on S.America service, 1931 scrapped.

CITY OF MANCHESTER 1851
The CITY OF MANCHESTER belonged to the British owned Inman Line, and was built in 1851 by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow. She was a 2,109 gross ton ship, length 265.3ft x beam 37.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, four masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. Launched on 14th Jun.1851, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Philadelphia on 26th Jul.1851. She started her last voyage on this service on 20th Dec.1854, and in 1855 was chartered by the French and used as a Crimean War transport. She resumed Liverpool - Philadelphia sailings on 3rd Aug.1856, and commenced her last voyage on this route on 6th May 1857. On 24th Aug.1857 she left London for Calcutta as an Indian Mutiny transport and on 22nd Dec.1858 started Liverpool - New York sailings. In 1862, after 48 North Atlantic sailings, she was fitted with new boilers and started her final voyage between Liverpool, Queenstown (Cobh), Halifax and New York on 28th Jan.1871. Later the same year, she was sold, her engines were removed and she operated as a sailing ship until 1876, when she was wrecked. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.238-9]

CITY OF MARSEILLES 1912
8250 gross tons, length 469.3ft x beam 57ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots. Accommodation for 141-1st and 46-2nd class passengers. Launched on 26th Oct.1912 by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne for Ellerman's Hall Line, she left Liverpool on 26th Jan.1913 on her maiden voyage to New York, Port Said and Bombay. She subsequently sailed between Liverpool and Bombay. On 23rd Nov.1915 she was attacked by a submarine en route Liverpool - Bombay and hit it with her gunfire. In Nov.1916 she picked up 95 survivors from P & O Line's ARABIA which had been torpedoed SW of Cape Matapan. In 1921 she was used for New York - Port Said - Bombay voyages for Ellerman Bucknall's American & Indian Line service, later via Marseilles and Naples. Between 1923 and 1930 she made regular seasonal trooping voyages to India until replaced by Bibby Line's LANCASHIRE. Damaged by a mine off the River Tay on 6th Jan.1940, but repaired. Stranded at Ceylon on 22nd Jan.1943 but refloated. Scrapped 1947.[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.16, Ellerman Lines]

CITY OF MONTREAL 1871
The CITY OF MONTREAL was a 4,451 gross ton ship, length 419.1ft x beam 44ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st, 60-2nd and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, she was launched on 20th Sep.1871 for the Inman Line of Liverpool. Her maiden voyage started on 8th Feb.1872 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. Her last voyage on this service started on 20th Jul.1876 and she was then fitted with new compound engines and a second funnel added. She resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service on 13th Sep.1877 and commenced her last voyage on 12th Jul.1887. On 10th Ag.1887 she was destroyed by fire at sea. All passengers and crew were rescued by the Furness ship YORK CITY. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.242-3]

CITY OF NAGPUR 1922
10,146 gross tons, 490ft x 59.1ft, single screw, speed 15 knots, built 1922 by Workman, Clark & Co, Belfast (Yard No.464) for Ellerman's City Line. On 29th Apr.1941 she was torpedoed and sunk by U.75 (Ringelmann) in the Atlantic 600 miles west of Valentia Island, Ireland in position 52.30N 26.00W while sailing independently on a voyage Glasgow to Natal, Bombay and Karachi via Freetown with 274 passengers and 2184 tons of general cargo. The Master, Capt. D. L. Lloyd, 170 crew, 8 gunners and 273 passengers were rescued by HM Destroyer HURRICANE and landed at Greenock. 15 crew and 1 passenger were lost.

CITY OF NEW YORK 1861
This was a 2,360 gross ton ship, built in 1861 by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow for the Inman Line. Her details were - length 336ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 158-cabin and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12/4/1861, she sailed from Liverpool on 11/9/1861 on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. Her last voyage started on 24/2/1864 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown and New York and on her homeward journey, when approaching Queenstown in the early morning of 29th March 1864, she struck the sunken reef known as Daunt's Rock, and became a total loss. There were no casualties. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,pps.224/240]

CITY OF NEW YORK / DELAWARE / NORWEGIAN 1865
The second CITY OF NEW YORK was a 2,642 gross ton ship built by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow in 1865. Length 321ft x beam 39.6ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched as the DELAWARE for Richardson, Spence & Co, Liverpool on 25/2/1865, she went to Inman Line the same year and was renamed CITY OF NEW YORK. On 7/6/1865 she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. In 1871 she was rebuilt to a length of 375.2ft and 3,523 gross tons and on 4/4/1871 resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service. In September 1876 she was chartered to the American Line and completed three round voyages between Liverpool and Philadelphia, and the following year was fitted with compound engines. She was then chartered to the Guion Line and on 8/6/1878 commenced the first of 2 round voyages between Liverpool - Queenstown and New York. On 19/12/1882 she commenced her last voyage for the Inman Line when she left Liverpool for New York and in 1883 went to the Allan Line and was renamed NORWEGIAN. Fitted with new compound engines, she commenced Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 12/6/1884, Glasgow - New York sailings on 20/11/1891 and Glasgow - Boston sailings on 4/7/1896. Her last Glasgow - New York voyage commenced on 28/4/1900 and her last Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 23/5/1903. She was scrapped the same year in Holland. [North Atlantic Seaway, by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.241]

CITY OF NEW YORK 1875
The CITY OF NEW YORK was an iron built, 3,019 gross ton, screw propulsion steamer with a speed of 14 knots. She was built in 1875 by Roach, Chester, PA for the Pacific Mail Steamship Co.and sailed on her first voyage from San Francisco to Kandavau (Fiji) and Sydney on 24th April 1876. On 26th October 1893 she was wrecked on Point Bonita, San Francisco Bay. The company ran a service between San Francisco, Fiji, Honolulu and Australia / New Zealand ports and from 1879, advertised in the London Times "An overland route from Britain to Australia, New Zealand, China, etc, via New York and San Francisco in connection with the Anchor Line from London or Glasgow to New York. Through tickets are available". [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

CITY OF NEW YORK / NEW YORK / HARVARD / PLATTSBURG 1888
The NEW YORK was built by J & G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1888 for the Inman line as the CITY OF NEW YORK. She was a 10,499 gross ton vessel with a clipper stem, length 527.6ft x beam 63.2ft, three funnels, three masts, twin screw and a speed of 20 knots. There was accommodation for 540-1st, 200-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 15/3/1888, she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 1/8/1888. In August 1892 she made a record crossing between Sandy Hook and Queenstown and on 8/2/1893 commenced her last Liverpool - New York voyage. On 22/2/1893 she went to the American Line and was put under the US flag. She was then renamed NEW YORK and her accommodation altered to carry 290-1st, 250- 2nd and 725-3rd class passengers. On 25/2/1893 she sailed from New York on her first voyage to Southampton and commenced her last voyage on this service on 16/4/1898. She then became the US Armed Cruiser HARVARD until 11/1/1899 when she resumed the New York - Southampton service as the NEW YORK. On 14/1/1899 her starboard engine broke down and was repaired at Southampton and she resumed service from Southampton - New York on 25/3/1899. On 20/4/1901 she left Southampton for her last voyage to Cherbourg and New York before being rebuilt with new triple expansion engines, number of funnels reduced to two, and her size increased to 10,798 tons. On 15/4/1903 she resumed the New York - Cherbourg - Southampton service and in 1913, her first class passenger accommodation was downgraded to second class. Commenced her last voyage Southampton - Cherbourg - New York on 1/8/1914 and was transferred to the New York - Liverpool run on 14/8/1914. In April 1918 she made her last run from Liverpool to New York and then became the US Transport PLATTSBURG. On 19/2/1920 she resumed the New York - Plymouth - Southampton service as the "New York" and her masts were reduced to two. On 2/11/1920 she made her last run from Southampton to Cherbourg and New York and in 1921 was sold to the Polish Navigation Co. who retained her name and used her for one round voyage New York - Antwerp - Danzig - Southampton - Cherbourg - Brest - New York. She was then seized for debt and sold. In 1922 she went to the Irish American Line and later the same year to the United Transatlantic Line. On 10/6/1922 she left New York for the last time for the American Black Sea Line on a voyage to Naples and Constantinople where she was sold at auction by order of the US government, and was scrapped at Genoa in 1923. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, p.244]

CITY OF PARIS / TONQUIN 1865
This was a 2,556 gross ton ship, length 346ft x beam 40.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, she was launched for the Inman Line of Liverpool 13th Dec.1865. She started her maiden voyage on 21st Mar.1866 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. In Aug.1869 she made a record passage from Queenstown to Halifax and in 1870 was lengthened to 397.7ft and 3,081 gross tons. She resumed Liverpool - Queenstown - New York voyages on 5th May 1870 and started her last voyage on this service on 9th Mar,1876. Fitted with compound engines in 1879, she went back to the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York route on 14th Apr.1880. Her final Liverpool - New York sailing commenced 4th Sep.1883 and she was sold to French owners in 1884 and renamed TONQUIN. She was sunk in collision off Malaga, Spain on 4th Mar.1885.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.242]

CITY OF PARIS / PARIS / YALE / PHILADELPHIA / HARRISBURG 1888
The second CITY OF PARIS was a 10,499 gross ton ship, length 527.6ft x beam 63.2ft, clipper bows, three funnels, three masts (rigged for sail), twin screw, speed 20 knots. Accommodation for 540-1st, 200-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by J.& G. Thomson, Glasgow, she was launched for the Inman Line of Liverpool on 23rd Oct.1888 and started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Queenstown and New York on 3rd Apr.1889. She made several record voyages to New York and in 1893 went to the American Line and was renamed PARIS. She sailed between New York and Southampton under the American flag and for a short while in 1898 became the US armed cruiser YALE before resuming her previous name and service. Rebuilt in 1899 with two funnels, she was then renamed PHILADELPHIA and continued New York - Southampton / Liverpool sailings. In 1918 she became the US transport HARRISBURG, and in 1920 reverted to PHILADELPHIA. Sold to the New York - Naples SS Co in 1922, she sailed from New York to Gibraltar and Naples where she was seized for debt and was sold and scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.245]

CITY OF PARIS 1907
9,191 gross tons, length 493.2ft x beam 57.8ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 272-1st and 64-2nd class passengers. Built by Barclay, Curle & Co., Glasgow, she was completed in 1907 for Ellerman's City Line and placed on their Liverpool - Bombay service. In 1911 she took the Liverpool - Bombay record with a passage of 19 days 1 hour. 1915 employed as a troopship and then used on Government service including a number of voyages to India with officials. On 4th Apr.1917 inbound from India to Marseilles with cargo and 13 passengers, she was torpedoed shortly after midnight by the German submarine UC.65 while 46 miles South by East from Cap d'Antibes. Having been previously warned of U.Boats, she was steering a zig-zag course at the time. The ship was being abandoned when the U-Boat surfaced and commenced shelling her, before sinking her with a second torpedo. French patrol boats later found four lifeboats with 41 bodies in them. Two further boats were never found and a total of 122 lives were lost. [Merchant Fleets, vol.16, Ellerman Lines by Duncan Haws]

CITY OF PERTH / TURAKINA / ELIDA 1866
1,188 gross tons, length 232.5ft x beam 35.4ft x depth 22.2ft, iron hull, three masted full rigged ship. Built 1866 by Charles Connell & Co, Glasgow for George Smith & Sons who later became City Line and in 1901 were taken over by Ellerman Line, she was a frozen meat carrier and was placed on the Calcutta route. On 16th Jan.1872 she left Calcutta for New York and sailed 12,000 miles in 79 days. On 14th May 1882 while lying at the inner anchorage, she was blown ashore at Timaru during the great gale. The adjacent BENVENUE was wrecked and her crew rowed to the CITY OF PERTH. Then all escaped ashore when she too, grounded. Attempts to secure the ship cost nine lives in swamped lifeboats. June 1882 sold locally for 800 UKP, refloated and towed to Port Chalmers for repairs and fitted with accommodation for 340 immigrants. 1883 acquired by New Zealand Shipping Co. and renamed TURAKINA and made 15 round voyages to the UK for them. She became NZSCo's last sailing vessel when sold. 14th Feb.1895 she became famous for her speed when she overtook NZSCo's steamer RUAPEHU in the South Atlantic. 1899 sold to Alexander Bech, Tvedestrand, Norway renamed ELIDA and reduced to barque rig. 1914 scrapped. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws]

CITY OF RICHMOND 1873
The CITY OF RICHMOND was a 4,607 gross ton ship, length 440.8ft x beam 44.2ft, clipper stem, two funnels, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 125-1st, 80-2nd and 1,310-3rd class passengers. Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, she was launched on 15th Feb.1873 for the Inman Line. Her maiden voyage started on 4th Sep.1873 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. Her last sailing started on this route on 20th May 1891 and she was then sold to other British owners. Re-sold in 1892 to Norway, she was scrapped in 1896. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.243]

CITY OF ROME 1881
8,415 gross tons, length 560.2ft x beam 52.3ft, clipper bows, three funnels, four masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw, speed 16 knots, accommodation for 271-1st, 250-2nd and 810-steerage class passengers. Built by Barrow Shipbuilding Co., Barrow, she was launched on 14th Jun.1881 for the Inman Line and started her maiden voyage on 13th Oct.1881 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown and New York. After five voyages, she transferred to the Anchor Line in 1882 but continued on the same route. In 1891 she was refitted to accommodate 75-1st, 250-2nd and 1,000-steerage class passengers and transferred to Glasgow - Moville - New York sailings. In Sep.1898 she repatriated 1,690 Spanish troops from Portsmouth, USA to Santander after the Spanish-American War and commenced her final Glasgow - Moville - New York - Glasgow voyage on 26th Sep.1901. In 1902 she was scrapped in Germany. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.243 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

CITY OF ROME / SUWANEE / SOMERSET 1911
The CITY OF ROME that sank the S-51 was a coastal passenger steamer of the Savannah Line. She was named for the city of Rome in the State of Georgia, not the one in Italy. She was built by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation at Camden, New Jersey in 1911 as the SUWANNEE of the Merchants & Miners Line, and was sold to the Savannah Line in September 1917. She was sold back to Merchants & Miners in 1928 and renamed SOMERSET, and was broken up at Baltimore in 1938. For Merchants & Miners she ran between Philadelphia, Baltimore, Savannah, and Jacksonville, Florida. For the Savannah Line she ran between Boston and Savannah. 3648 tons enrolled length 309 ft., breadth 46 ft. 170 passengers only carried cargo after July 1936 Jacksonville steamboat and steamship historian Ed Mueller is currently working on a history of Merchants & Miners.

CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 1875
The CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO was a passenger ship built 1875 for the Pacific Mail Steamship Co and operated temporarily between SF and Australia / New Zealand. She was lost on the Panama run in 1877 (no details). Details - 3,000 gross tons (approx), length 350ft x beam 40ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail).

CITY OF SPARTA / FLORENCE STELLA / STAUT 1870
Brief details of the CITY OF SPARTA are - 1,193 gross tons, length 71.38m x beam 10.67m, three masted, full-rigged ship. Built in 1870 by Alex Stephen & Sons, Kelvinhaugh for George Smith & Sons (City Line). Completed in March 1870, she usually sailed from Glasgow. In 1889 she was sold to S.Goldberg & Sons, Swansea and renamed FLORENCE STELLA. 190? sold to J.B.Linaae, Sandefjord, renamed STAUT. 1912 sold to A.Gordon-Firing. 1917 stopped by the German surface raider MOEWE and sunk with time bombs.[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.16, Ellerman Lines]

CITY OF VALENCIA 1908
Sister ship of CITY OF LUCKNOW. (ex-RODA built 1908), 1920 acquired by Ellermans, renamed CITY OF VALENCIA, placed on Karachi service. Nov.18th 1921 transferred to American & Indian Line service. 1933 laid up at Liverpool. 1934 scrapped.

CITY OF VALPARAISO / BRISTOL / COSTA RICA 1879
1,983 gross tons, length 278ft x beam 38.3ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots.
Launched 1873 by M. Pearse & Co, Stockton (engines by Hawks, Crawshay & Co, Gateshead) for British owners as the CITY OF VALPARAISO. 1879 sold to Great Western Steamship Line, Bristol, renamed BRISTOL and commenced her first Bristol - New York voyage on 6th Jun.1879. Her last voyage on this route started on 31st Jan.1885 and she was then laid up until 19th Oct.1886 when she sailed from Newport, Mon for New York. On 20th Dec.1886 she left Swansea for New York and in 1887 was sold to Costa Rican owners and renamed COSTA RICA. 1897 sold to Canadian owners and reverted to BRISTOL. 2nd Jan.1902 wrecked at Dixon Entrance, British Columbia with loss of 5 lives.

CITY OF VENICE 1867
1,199 gross tons, 230.6ft x 31.8ft, three masted, full rigged sailing ship built 1867 by Charles Connell & Co, Glasgow for George Smith & Sons, City Line. The company sailed mostly between Glasgow and Indian ports via the cape of Good Hope. They also traded to Australia and New Zealand or Calcutta - New York- Glasgow. The CITY OF VENICE entered the Calcutta service in April 1867 and on 6th Oct. 1871 was wrecked on Rodrigues Island, east of Mauritius while on passage Glasgow to Bombay. On 7th Nov. the ship broke up after part of the cargo had been salvaged The rescued crew were taken to Mauritius.

CITY OF WASHINGTON 1855
The CITY OF WASHINGTON was built in 1855 by Tod & MacGregor, Glasgow for the Inman Line of Liverpool. This was a 2,381 gross ton ship, length 319ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 1/8/1855, she sailed in September of that year from Liverpool to Marseilles, where she was chartered to the French government and used as a Crimean War transport. On 5/11/1856 she commenced her first Liverpol - Philadelphia voyage and after this one voyage, inaugurated Inman Line's Liverpool - New York service, leaving Liverpool on 31/12/1856. In November 1864 she was reconditioned and fitted with new boilers after having completed 63 N.Atlantic round voyages. In 1869 she was rebuilt to a length of 358ft and 2,870 tons and on 5/6/1869 commenced her first voyage after alterations from Liverpool to Queenstown (Cobh), Halifax and New York. She was wrecked near Cape Sable on 7/7/1873 due to a defective compass, with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.239]

CITY OF YORK 1904
7,844 gross tons, length 485ft x beam 56.3ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 137-1st and 28-2nd class passengers. Built by Workman. Clark & Co, Belfast and launched for Ellerman City Line on 17th Dec.1903. Her usual route was Glasgow - Liverpool - Port Said - Suez - Bombay - Karachi - Kathiawar ports - various routes homeward including East and South Africa - Continent - UK ports - Glasgow. 1921 transferred to the New York - India service. 1936 sold and renamed CITY for voyage to the breakers in Japan. [Merchant Fleets vol.16 by Duncan Haws]

CIUDAD CONDAL 1879 see WASHINGTON 1873

CLAN BUCHANAN / SHAH ALLUM 1882
2,968 gross tons, length 330.3ft x beam 40.1ft, single screw, speed 10 knots, accommodation for 40-1st class passengers. Launched by A. McMilland & Co., Dumbarton on 22nd Feb.1882 and entered service for the Clan Line (Cayzer, Irvine & Co.) in May 1882. Used on the Glasgow - Liverpool / Birkenhead - Suez Canal - Bombay / Calcutta service. 1899 converted to triple expansion engines by Vickers, Sons & Maxim, Barrow. 1904 sold to Essajee Tajbhoy (Shah Steam Nav. Co.), Bombay and renamed SHAH ALLUM. 10th Jun.1909 inbound Rangoon to Bhavnagar, India, wrecked on Piram Cogho Island, Gogra. [Merchant Fleets, vol.33 by Duncan Haws]

CLAN DRUMMOND 1882
2,922 gross tons, length 330.3ft x beam 40.1ft, single screw, speed 10 knots, accomodation for 40-1st class passengers. Launched by A. McMilland & Co., Dumbarton on 14th (or 24th) May 1882 and entered service for Clan Line (Cayzer, Irvine & Co.) in July 1882. Used on the Glasgow - Liverpool / Birkenhead - Suez Canal - Bombay / Calcutta service. 10th Jan.1891 coming upstream to Calcutta she was caught by the current in the River Hooghli and the tugs could not hold her, She collided with the 4-master barque SIR ROBERT FERNIE and the steamer ANDORRA before running aground, but was refloated and repaired. In 1895 she made Clan Line's first call at Manchester. On 28th Nov.1898 while on voyage Liverpool to Port Elizabeth, she met severe weather in the Bay of Biscay and one huge wave swept away the whole bridge structure and the ship sank with the loss of 37 crew. One lifeboat with 27 men was picked up by Lamport & Holt Line's HOLBEIN. [Merchant Fleets, vol.33 by Duncan Haws]

CLAN GORDON 1879
O.N.80441, 2,315 gross tons, 305.6ft x 34.8ft, iron hull, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), single screw, speed 11 knots. Built by Alex. Stephen & Sons, Linthouse, Glasgow (Yard No.232) for Cayzer, Irvine & Co, Glasgow (not named Clan Line until 1890), she was launched on 11th Feb.1879. Specially built for service to South and East Africa via the newly built Suez Canal, she had accommodation aft for 32-1st class passengers. On 16th Oct.1897 while en route Glasgow - Suez - South African ports, she was wrecked, bound for Delagoa Bay at the mouth of the Umlazi River, Mozambique. [Merchant Fleets, vol.33 by Duncan Haws] [Gathering of the Clans by N. L. Middlemiss]

CLAN LAMONT 1939
O.N.165965 7,673 gross tons, length 463.7ft x beam 63.0ft, twin screw, built 1939 by Greenock Dockyard Co., Greenock (Yard No.438) for Clan Line Steamers Ltd., Glasgow. In June 1944 she crossed the English Channel five times with troops for the Normandy Invasion serving as an Infantry Landing Ship. 25th Jul.1944 commissioned into the Royal Navy as HMS LAMONT and on 2nd Aug.1944 sailed for the South West Pacific to assist the U.S. Navy but was rejected and used for training, trooping and an accommodation ship for British Pacific Fleet at Manus, Admiralty Islands. 1946 returned to UK via Panama Canal and fitted with extra accommodation for ferrying troops between Tilbury and Cuxhaven. 1947 returned to Clan Line services to India and South Africa as CLAN LAMONT. Aug.1961 scrapped at Mihara, Japan. [Gathering of the Clans by N. L. Middlemiss]

CLAN MACINTYRE / EASTERN EXPRESS 1951
6556 gross tons, length 471 ft x beam 60.7 ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 12 passengers. Launched by Lady Rotherwick on 31st Oct.1951 for the Clan Line of Steamers, she was completed by John Brown & Co, Clydebank (yard No.666) in Mar.1952. In 1976 she was sold to Renown Bay Shipping Co., Panama (Hong Kong owned and part of the Wallem group), renamed EASTERN EXPRESS. On 22nd Dec.1979 on passage La Spezia to Cagliari, Sardinia she grounded at Marina di Carrara on the Italian coast and was declared a total loss (cost of salvage and repairs exceeding the insurance value of the ship).[Merchant Fleets, vol.33 by Duncan Haws]

CLAN MACKENZIE 1917
6,544 gross ton cargo steamer, length 420ft x beam 53.4ft, single screw, speed 12 knots. Built 1917 by Northumberland Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle for the Clan Line Steamers Ltd, Glasgow. 5th Mar.1918 bound for Philadelphia, she was torpedoed and damaged in the English Channel off St. Catherrines Point by German U-Boat UB.30. 82 crew were taken off by the destroyer HMS GARLAND but. 6 lives lost. Reboarded the next day and towed to Portsmouth for repairs On 23rd Oct.1937 she collided with the S.S. MANCHESTER REGIMENT off Liverpool and stranded off Newcome Knoll on voyage Liverpool - East London, South Africa. Refloated and sold for scrapping.

CLAN MATHESON 1883
The CLAN MATHESON was a 3917 gross ton ship, length 381ft x beam 43.3ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), single screw, speed 11 knots. There was accommodation for 1st and 3rd class passengers. Launched for the Clan Line (Cayzer, Irvine & Co) by Napier, Shanks & Bell, Glasgow on 20th Aug.1883, she was used on the Far East service. In 1893 she grounded in the Suez Canal, causing massive cost penalties for her owners and in 1895 cruised with guest to the opening of the Kiel Canal by the Kaiser. Sold in 1905 to Hamburg Diederichsen, Jebson & Co, she was renamed MARIECHEN and used on their service to Vladivostok. In 1906 she grounded at Chichagoff, Alaska, was refloated and towed to Seattle where she was condemned and scrapped.[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, Clan Line]

CLAN MATHESON 1917
O.N.137858, 5,960 gross tons, length 405ft x beam 50.5ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 11 knots. Completed in Jan.1917 by Sir James Laing & Sons Ltd, Sunderland (Yard No.657) for The Clan Line Steamers Ltd (Cayzer, Irvine & Co, Ltd), Glasgow. She made here maiden voyage to Genoa with a cargo of coal. On 23rd May 1918 she was sunk in a convoy collision with the American ship WESTERN FRONT in position 40.32N 49.10W while on voyage New Orleans & New York to Nantes with a cargo of barley, oats and steel. [Register of Merchant Ships Completed in 1917 by Starke / Schell]

CLAN OGILVIE 1882
Official Number 86718, 2,425 gross tons, length 324.5ft x beam 38.1ft x depth 23.8ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 10 knots. Launched 24th Nov.1882 by A. Stephen & Sons, Glasgow (Yard No.264) for Cayzer, Irvine & Co., (Clan Line) Glasgow. On 8th Jan.1888 she was wrecked off Maddelena, Straits of Bonifacio on voyage Bombay - Naples - Marseilles - London. [Gathering of the Clans by N. L. Middlemiss] [Merchant Fleets, vol.33 by Duncan Haws]

CLAN OGILVY 1914
5,802 gross tons, length 430ft x beam 54.3ft, single screw, speed 12 knots, Launched 20th Oct.1914 by Wm.Doxford & Sons, Sunderland for the Clan Line of Steamers. In 1938 she was transferred to R. P. Houston & Co. On 30th Jun.1940 the ship was torpedoed in No.1 hold, in the Bay of Biscay, abandoned but re-boarded and continued to Falmouth. On 12th Mar.1941 while on voyage Chittagong to the UK with a general cargo including pig iron, groundnuts and tea, she left Freetown in convoy SL.68. Torpedoed aft on 20th March, blowing off her stern by the U.105 northwest of Dakar at position 20.04N 25.45W. The hit exploded the after ammunition locker, killing all aft and the ship sank in four minutes. The Master and three crew were picked up by the BATNA (Strick Line) and landed at Takoradi and 20 men by the Spanish ship CABO VILLANO were rescued and taken to Santos, Brazil. 61 crew were killed. Despite being escorted by the battleship HMS MALAYA, the convoy lost 12 ships to two U-Boats.

CLAYMORE / CITY OF ANDROS / CITY OF HYDRA 1955
1024 g.t., 192.3ft x 35ft, twin screw, speed 12.5 knots. Built 1955 by Wm. Denny & Bros, Dumbarton for David MacBrayne's Inner Islands service Oban - Tobermory - Coll - Tiree - Castlebay - Lochboisdale route. 1965 additional summer cruises out of Fort William. 1972 Having become too small to handle the increasing traffic, she became the relieving ship. 1976 sold to Canopus Shipping S.A., Greece renamed CITY OF ANDROS. Registered to A & G. Kyrtatas, Piraeus and renamed CITY OF HYDRA, used for day cruises Piraeus - Poros - Hydra. 1994 still in service.

CLEVELAND / MOBILE / KING ALEXANDER 1908
16,960 gross tons, length 589ft x beam 65.3ft, two funnels, four masts, twin screw, speed 16 knots, accommodation for 239-1st, 224-2nd, 494-3rd and 1,897-4th class passengers. Launched on 26th Sep.1908 by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg as the CLEVELAND for Hamburg America Line, she started her maiden voyage on 27th Mar.1909 when she left Hamburg for Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. She made her last sailing on this route on 24th May 1913 and the transferred to Hamburg - Boulogne - Southampton - Boston voyages until July 1914 when she was laid up. Sold to Sweden in 1917 but sale not recognized by the Allies after the Armistice and she was surrendered to the USA in 1919. Renamed MOBILE and used as a U.S Transport until 1920 when she was allocated to Britain as war reparations and chartered to White Star Line. She made two Liverpool - Queenstown - New York voyages in 1920 and was then sold to the Byron Line and renamed KING ALEXANDER. First voyage Piraeus - New York started 18th Dec.1920 and twefth and last voyage Constanza - Constantinople - Piraeus - New York started 4th Jun.1923. 1923 sold to United American Line, renamed CLEVELAND, converted from coal to oil fuel and refitted to carry 600-cabin and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Between Oct.1923 and Jun.1926 she made 25 Hamburg - Southampton - New York voyages and was then sold back to Hamburg America Line and resumed Hamburg - New York sailings. On 30th Aug.1931 she sailed from Hamburg on her final voyage to Boulogne, Halifax, Boston, New York, Boston, Galway, Cherbourg, Hamburg and was then laid up until 1933 when she was scrapped.[North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1, p.414 by N. R. P. Bonsor]

CLIO 1864
Built by C.&W.Earle, Hull in 1864 for Thomas Wilson, Sons & Co of Hull. She was a 1,107 gross ton ship, length 233.7ft x beam 30.7ft x depth 19.9ft, iron construction, simple two-cylinder engine and a single screw. Official Number 47933. She sailed on the North Sea and Baltic ports to Hull service until 7/12/1866 when she stranded on the West coast of Jutland and remained aground for eighteen months until salvaged and repaired. On 13/11/1868 she was sold by her salvors to Bailey & Leetham of Hull and on 21/7/1869 she was sunk in collision with the British steamer NIOBE in thick fog off Gotland, while on passage from Cronstadt to Hull. She sank with the loss of her master and 16 of her crew. [Wilson Line by John Harrower]

CLIVE / LORD CLIVE 1871
This was a 3,386 gross ton ship, length 381ft x beam 40.1ft, one funnel, four masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 1st and 3rd (steerage) class accommodation. Built by R.& J. Evans, Liverpool (engines by G. Forrester & Co., Liverpool) for G. M. Papayanni, Liverpool, she was launched on 28th Oct.1871 as the LORD CLIVE. Chartered to the Dominion Line, she started her first Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 15th Sep.1872. On 7th Nov.1872 she commenced her first Liverpool - Boston - Portland sailing and on 9th Jul.1873 started her first Liverpool - Boston direct sailing. She reverted to G. M. Papayanni in Sep.1873 but continued on the same service until she was chartered to the American Line in 1875. Her first Liverpool - Philadelphia voyage for American Line started on 15th Dec.1875, and in 1888 she was purchased by the Lord Clive SS Co. which was owned by the American Line, but sailed under the British flag. She continued on the Liverpool - Philadelphia route until starting her last sailing on 27th Sep.1893. In 1896 she was sold to Gastaldi & Co., Genoa, renamed CLIVE, and was used on the New York - Naples - Genoa service. On 8th Nov.1896 she started New York - Naples - Genoa sailings under charter to Furness, Withy & Co. and commenced her third and last sailing from Leghorn to Genoa, Naples and New York on 1st Mar.1897. She then made a few cargo voyages between Liverpool and Boston before being scrapped in April 1898. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.803] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.16, Ellerman Lines]

CLYDE 1841
1,841 gross tons, overall length 275ft x beam (over paddle boxes) 60ft, wooden hull, one funnel, three masts (barquentine rigged), side paddle wheel propulsion, speed 9 knots, accommodation for 100 passengers.
Built 1841 by Robert Duncan, Greenock for Royal Mail Steam Packet Co., London, she started her maiden voyage on 18th Dec. when she left Southampton for Corunna, Madeira and the West Indies. She continued West Indies voyages until 1865 when she was broken up.

CLYDE 1854
1,169 gross tons, length 249.1ft x beam 30.2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw, speed 9 knots. Accommodation for Cabin and Intermediate 3rd class passengers. Launched 18th Mar.1854 by John Scott & Sons, Greenock (engines by Scott, Sinclair & Co, Glasgow), for the Clyde Screw Steam Packet Co, she started her maiden voyage from Glasgow for New York on 20th May 1854. Her second and last voyage on this route started 27th Jul.1854 and she was then used as a Crimean War Transport. On 10th Jan.1857 she resumed Glasgow - New York sailings and made one further sailing on this service on 9th Mar.1857. Her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage (first steamship sailing from the Clyde to the St.Lawrence) commenced 21st May 1857 and her last on 22nd Jul.1857. She sailed from Quebec from Glasgow under Capt.Meiklereid on 22nd Aug.1857 and on 24th Aug. was wrecked on Perroquet Reef, Gulf of St.Lawrence with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.270 by Duncan Haws]

CLYDE / SHAH NOOR 1881
4,136 gross tons, 390ft x 42.1ft, two funnels, four masts, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 123-1st and 48-2nd class passengers. Launched 14th Jun.1881 by Wm. Denny & Bros, Dumbarton (Yard No.247) for Peninsular & Oriental S.N.Co, she was built for the India and Australia routes. In 1901 she was severely damaged by fire while refitting for trooping at Bombay and in July 1901 was sold to Shah S.N.Co (Essafji Tajbhoy Borah), Bombay, renamed SHAH NOOR and used on the Mecca pilgrimage trade. 1905 sold to Mazagon Powder Works, Bombay and scrapped.

COAMO 1901 see STATE OF CALIFORNIA 1891

COBLENZ / SACHEM / CUBA 1897
3,169 gross tons, length 306ft x beam 42ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 24-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg as the COBLENZ for North German Lloyd, Bremen, she was launched on 18th Mar.1897. In Aug.1897 she made her maiden voyage from Bremen to Rio de Janeiro and Santos and on 1st Sep.1900 started her first Bremen - Baltimore voyage. Her second and last voyage on this route started 1st Sep.1900 and she then made one Bremen - Philadelphia - Baltimore sailing. In 1917 she was seized by U.S Authorities at Manila and renamed SACHEM, used as U.S Transport. 1920 transferred to Pacific Mail SS Co. renamed CUBA. 8th Sep.1923 wrecked in Santa Barbara Channel, California.

COLINA 1872
The COLINA was a 2,001 gross ton ship, length 319.3ft x beam 34.8ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots. There was accommodation for 14-1sr and 250-3rd class passengers. Built by Barclay, Curle & Co, Glasgow, she was launched for the Donaldson Line of Glasgow on 31st Oct.1872. Her maiden voyage started on 27th Feb.1873 when she left Glasgow for Montevideo and Buenos Aires, and on 13th May 1874 she started her first Antwerp - New York voyage under charter to the Red Star Line. Her fourth and last voyage on this service started on 5th Oct.1874 and she resumed South America sailings on 17th Dec. Her first of four Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailings started on 4th May 1878 and on 15th Feb.1879 she commenced a single round voyage between Glasgow and Portland. She resumed the Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal service on 29th Apr.1879 and commenced her last voyage on this route on 11th Oct.1882. She subsequently sailed to either Baltimore, Canada or South America and started her last voyage from Glasgow to Halifax on 6th Aug.1892. She was then laid up and sold to Edward Watson, Glasgow in 1895 and scrapped at Genoa in 1898.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1009]

COLNE 1903
875 gross tons, 235ft x 31.7ft, built 1903 by Clyde SB & Eng. Co., Glasgow for the Goole Shipping Co. She was a cargo steamer fitted with refrigerated holds. Originally used on the Goole - Copenhagen service. In Jan.1905 the company was taken over by Lancashire &Yorkshire Railway Co. and on Mar.11th 1906 she sailed from Goole (not Hull) for Rotterdam with coal and general cargo plus deck freight. At 0500 on 12th March while 35 miles from the Maas lightvessel she ran into a severe and sudden gale which threw her onto her beam ends, spilling the deck cargo which jammed the scupper steering rods which caused her to broach (side on to the weather). Before the cargo could be shifted to clear the steering, the seas overwhelmed the ship and she capsized and sank. The port lifeboat was the only one to survive and 6 men were picked up by the trawler UNCLE DICK. [Merchant Fleets, vol.25 by Duncan Haws]

COLOMBO 1872
The COLOMBO was a Wilson Line steamer employed on the Hull - New York service. She was a 2,624 gross ton ship, length 333.1ft x beam 36.7ft x depth 27.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Official Number 68655. There was accommodation for 40-1st and 20-2nd class passengers. Launched by Humphreys & Pearson, Hull on 16.9.1872, she commenced her maiden voyage on 21.4.1875 when she left Hull for Southampton and New York. On 3.12.1876 she left Hull for New York with 44 persons on board, and was last spoken in position 47.26N, 35.33W, but not heard of since. Passenger fares were - 1st class 12 guineas(12.60 UKP), 2nd class 7 guineas (7.35 UKP), steerage 6 UKP. [Wilson Line by John Harrower]

COLOMBO / SAN GENNARO 1915
Built by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne as the SAN GENNARO for Sicula Americana, Messina this was a 12,087 gross ton ship, length 518ft x beam 64ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Launched in Oct.1915, she was transferred to Transoceanica of Naples and completed in 1917 as a 10,917 gross ton cargo ship. In 1921 she was rebuilt to 12,087 tons with accommodation for 100-1st, 700-2nd and 2,000-3rd class passengers. The company was absorbed by Navigazione Generale Italiana in 1921 and the ship was renamed COLOMBO. She commenced her first Naples - New York voyage on 23rd Nov.1921, was refitted to carry cabin, intermediate and 3rd class in 1925 and on 4th Sep.1928 started her last Genoa - Naples - Palermo - New York sailing. Subsequently used on the South American service, she came under the ownership of Italia Line in 1932 and Lloyd Triestino in 1937. On 8th Apr.1941 she was scuttled at Massaua, Eritrea, was later raised and scrapped in 1949.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1119]

COLONIAN 1901
The COLONIAN was a 6,440 gross ton ship, length 450.5ft x beam 54.2ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation for 60-1st and 350-3rd class passengers. Built by R & W.Hawthorn, Leslie & Co, Hebburn-on-Tyne, she was launched for the Leyland Line for their West Indies and Mexican Gulf services on 19th Jul.1901. Chartered to the Dominion Line, she made eight Liverpool - Portland voyages between March and Dec.1902, before being returned to her normal service. On 20th May 1917 she was wrecked on Bishop's Rock, Pembrokeshire. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.811]

COLORADO 1867
The COLORADO was built in 1867 by Palmer Bros & Co, Jarrow-on-Tyne for the Guion Line of Liverpool. She was a 2,927 gross ton ship, length 335ft x beam 43ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was capacity for 72-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 30th Oct.1867, she sailed from Liverpool on 14th Jan.1868 on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. On 7th Feb.1872 she sailed from Liverpool for New York and was in collision with the British steamer ARABIAN in the River Mersey the same day and sank with the loss of six lives.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.708]

COLUMBIA 1856
1347 gross tons, length 234ft x beam 35ft, one funnel, two masts, wooden hull, side paddle wheel propulsion, speed 10 knots. Launched 27th Nov.1856 by Spofford & Tileston, for the New York - Charleston trade, she was chartered by Collins Line and on 6th Jun.1857 started her first Liverpool - New York voyage. She started a second voyage on this service on 5th Aug.1857 and then returned to other routes. 1876 deliberately burned for metal contents. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.208 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

COLUMBIA / FRANCESCO CRISPI 1866
The COLUMBIA was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1866 for the Anchor Line of Glasgow. She was a 1,698 gross ton ship, length 283.3ft x beam 33.6ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 10/9/1866, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to New York on 27/10/1866. Between 1872-74 she sailed between Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow (4 Voyages), and between 1874-75 between Glasgow - Liverpool - Halifax - St John NB (2 voyages). From 1875-76 she made two round voyages between Bordeaux and New York. In 1878 she was rebuilt to 2,030 tons and fitted with compound engines and from 1878-82 she made 7 voyages between Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay. In 1883 she made a single voyage Glasgow - Liverpool - Calcutta and between 1880-81 also made 9 voyages London - Halifax - Boston. From 1883-92 she completed 26 voyages from Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow and in Sept.1892 commenced her final voyage from Glasgow to Genoa, Malaga, Halifax, New York and Glasgow. She was sold to the Italian company, Italo-Brittanico on 26/1/1894, renamed FRANCESCO CRISPI and in Aug.1898 was wrecked on Shipwash. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.453]

COLUMBIA / RAPIDO / TEREK 1889
The COLUMBIA was a Hamburg America Line ship, built in dry dock in 1889 by Laird Bros, Birkenhead. Her details were 7,241 gross tons, length 463.5ft x beam 55.6ft, three funnels, three masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was accommodation for 400-1st, 120-2nd and 580-3rd class passengers. Floated on 27/2/1889, she left Hamburg on 18/7/1889 on her maiden voyage to Southampton and New York. On 19/12/1893 she commenced her first voyage from Genoa to Naples and New York and made several further winter voyages on this route. Her last Hamburg - Southampton - New York sailing commenced on 14/10/1897 and in 1898 she was sold to the Spanish government for use as a troopship and auxiliary for the Spanish - American War and renamed RAPIDO. In 1899 she was repurchased by Hamburg America Line, went back to her original name of COLUMBIA and on 31/8/1899, commenced sailing between Hamburg, Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. Her last sailing on this route started on 9/10/1902 and on 3/4/1904 she made a single sailing from Naples to Genoa and New York. In 1904 she was sold to the Russian Volunteer Fleet, renamed TEREK and used as a troop transport in the Russo - Japanese War. Scrapped in 1907. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.396] [Merchant Fleets in Profile by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

COLUMBIA / COLUMBELLA / MOREAS 1902
8,292 gross tons, length 485.5ft x beam 56.3ft, three funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation for 345-1st, 218-2nd and 740-3rd class passengers. Built by D.& W. Henderson Ltd, Glasgow, she was launched on 22nd Feb.1902 for the Anchor Line. She started her maiden voyage on 17th May 1902 when she left Glasgow for Moville, Ireland and New York. In Nov.1914 she was taken up as an Armed Merchant Cruiser and renamed HMS COLUMBELLA and was later attached to the Atlantic squadron of the US Navy. Returned to her owners in 1919, she reverted to her original name, was refitted to carry 72-1st, 430-2nd and 378-3rd class passengers and resumed Glasgow - Moville - New York sailings on 20th Aug.1919. In 1921 she was converted from coal to oil fuel and in Nov.1922 was refitted to accommodate 492-cabin and 420-3rd class passengers. Her last Glasgow - Moville - New York - Glasgow voyage started on 22nd Aug.1925 and she was then laid up in the Clyde until March 1926 when she was sold to the Byron Line and renamed MOREAS. On 1st Sep.1926 she started her first Piraeus - New York sailing and commenced her third and last round voyage on this route on 15th Jan.1927. Laid up in Greece until 1928 when she was transferred to the National Greek Line, but did not sail for them. She was eventually scrapped at Venice in July 1929.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.466]

COLUMBIA 1949 see KATOOMBA 1913

COLUMBIAN 1890
The COLUMBIAN was a 5,088 gross ton ship, 442.6ft x 45.2ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw, speed 11 knots. Built 1890 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the Leyland Line, she started her maiden voyage on 29th Aug.1890 when she left Liverpool for Boston. On 15th Feb.1897 she was chartered to Wilson's & Furness-Leyland Line and used on the same route. Later chartered to Atlantic Transport Line who lent her to Phoenix Line for a voyage from Antwerp to Boston. She left Antwerp on 23rd Apr.1914 under the command of Capt. John Macdonald with a crew of 49 and a cargo of highly inflammable material including barium peroxide, matches, carbolic acid and napthalene oil. At just after midnight on 3rd May 1914 while 150 miles south from Sable Island, smoke was seen issuing from No.1 hold and the weather which had been worsening was now blowing at gale force with some snow. The crew was mustered to fire stations and a distress call was sent. The Leyland liner WINIFREDIAN was also asked to stand by. Shortly afterward there was an explosion and the deck blew up, two lifeboats and the wireless cabin were destroyed, five men were killed outright and all the lights extinguished. The ship was abandoned in the remaining boats with the loss of one more man who was washed overboard. The message sent to the WINIFREDIAN was never received, but was picked up by the SEYDLITZ who relayed it to the SACHEM, FRANCONIA, MANHATTAN, OLYMPIC and BRANDENBURG all of which hurried to the rescue. Meanwhile, the lifeboats had become seperated. Two were picked up, but the third under the First Mate, Robert Tiere drifted for 14 days in appalling weather before it was sighted by the U.S. Revenue cutter SENECA. Only the mate and three men survived from the original 14 in the boat, the rest having died from exposure and starvation. The total number lost was 18 men.

COLUMBUS 1924
32,354 gross tons, length 749.6ft x beam 83.1ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 19 knots, accommodation for 478-1st, 644-2nd and 602-3rd class passengers. Laid down in 1914 as the HINDENBURG, her building was delayed by the war and she was launched by F. Schichau, Danzig on 12th Aug.1922 as the COLUMBUS after previous launching attempts failed. Owned by North German Lloyd, Bremen, she started her maiden voyage from Bremen to New York on 22nd Apr.1924. On 2nd Aug.1927 her starboard propeller shaft broke in mid Atlantic causing the machinery to race and destroy itself and she was fitted with a temporary replacement engine from the cargo ship SCHWABEN which gave her a speed of 16 knots. She started her last Bremen - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York voyage on 21st Jun.1929 before being re-engined to provide 23 knots and fitted with shorter funnels. 14th Dec.1929 resumed New York sailings. In Aug.1939 the ship was on a Caribbean cruise out of New York when war was declared. Her passengers were landed at Havana and she took refuge in Vera Cruz. On 14th Dec.1939 she sailed in an attempt to reach Germany but was intercepted by HMS HYPERION which ordered her to stop. The German crew set her on fire and scuttled her to avoid capture 300 miles east of Norfolk, Virginia. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2,p.572 by N.R.P.Bonsor] [Great Passenger Ships of the World, vol.2 by Arnold Kludas, ISBN 0-85059-242-9 contains photos]

COMMONWEALTH 1900 see CANOPIC 1904

COMORIN 1882
3,546 gross tons, length 379.2ft x beam 40ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 11 knots. Built by Forges & Chantiers de la Mediterranee, La Seyne, she was launched for Cie.Nationale de Navigation, Marseilles on 16th Sep.1882. Her first and only round voyage between Marseilles - Naples - New York started on 10th Mar.1888 and on 6th Apr.1888 she was run into off Battery Point, NY while at anchor in quarantine by the US schoooner HATTIE PAGE, which was seriously damaged. Transferred to other services after this voyage, she was destroyed by fire at Marseilles on 1th Sep.1895, scuttled and later salvaged and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3,p.1171 by N.R.P.Bonsor] This book contains a photo of a near sister ship of these two vessels - CANTON. The company ceased passenger services to New York in 1896, but continued cargo work and services to the Far East. They went into liquidation in 1904.

COMRIE CASTLE / UMVOTI 1903
The COMRIE CASTLE wasn't sunk, but was torpedoed in the English Channel with the loss of nine lives and beached . Details of the ship are - 5167 gross tons, length 419ft x beam 50ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, 12 knots. Accommodation for 8-1st, 20- 2nd and 140-3rd class passengers. Built by Barclay, Curle & Co, Glasgow in 1903 for the Union-Castle Mail SS Co, she was used mainly on the UK - Mauritius service, mostly with cargoes of sugar. Between 1914-1918 she spent much time as a troopship and after torpedoing and repair, was transferred in 1924 to the subsidiary company Bullard King & Co and renamed UMVOTI. In 1940 she was sunk by the Admiralty as a blockship in Folkestone Harbour and the wreck was removed in 1943 in preparation for 'D' day.[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.18, Union Castle Line]

CONCORDIA 1881
This was a cargo ship with limited passenger accommodation belonging to the Donaldson Line of Glasgow. Built by Barclay, Curle & Co, Glasgow in 1881, she was a 2,544 gross ton ship, length 319.6ft x beam 41ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 6-1st class passengers and she probably carried steerage as well. Launched on 11th Jul.1881, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 31st Aug.1881. She transferred to an experimental service from Bristol to Quebec and Montreal on 24th Jul.1894, but this was found unsuccessful and she only made three round voyages on this route. In July 1896 she was damaged in collision with an iceburg in the Atlantic and was eventually sold to Italian owners in 1909. Scrapped in Italy in 1911. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1011] There is a photo of her in vol.3 of NAS and as she sailed for Donaldson for about 28 years.

CONGELLA / DOURO 1881
1,603 gross tons, length 255ft x beam 34.6ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 9 knots. Built by Wm.Doxford & Sons, Sunderland, she was completed in Dec.1881 as the CONGELLA for Bullard, King & Co. Sold to Ellerman & Papayanni Line in 1910 and renamed DOURO. On 5th Sep.1915 she was captured and sunk by gunfire in the Atlantic 79 miles SW x W from Bishop Rock in position 48.55N 07.48W by the German submarine U.20 while en route the Clyde to Port Natal with general cargo. [Merchant Fleets vol.16 by Duncan Haws] [British Merchant Ships Sunk by U-Boats in the 1914-1918 War by A. J. Tennent]

CONGRESS / NANKING / EMMA ALEXANDER / EMPIRE WOODLARK 1913
The CONGRESS was a 7793 gross ton ship, 442ft x 54.9ft, two funnels, twin screw, built 1913 by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N.J. for Pacific Coast SS Co. She could carry 500 passengers and was used on the Seattle - San Francisco - Los Angeles - San Diego service. On 14th Sep.1916 while off Crescent City, Calif., she caught fire and completely burnt out, all pasengers and crew leaving in lifeboats. Towed to Seattle, she was purchased by China Mail SS Co, completely rebuilt and renamed NANKING. Used on trans-Pacific services, the company became insolvent in 1922 and the ship was seized and auctioned to Pacific SS Co. who had acquired Pacific Coast SS Co in 1916. Renamed EMMA ALEXANDER, she was again rebuilt and returned to the West Coast run until 1934 when she was laid up at Oakland. In 1940 the ship was acquired by the British Government, refitted and arrived at Liverpool in Dec.1941. Renamed EMPIRE WOODLARK, she was used as a troopship until 1946. On 2nd Nov.1946 she was deliberately scuttled with a cargo of surplus chemical ammunition North of the Hebrides in position 59.00N 07.40W.

CONSTITUTION / PRINCESS CHARLOTTE / ENGLAND / CANARIAS 1856
2,160 gross tons, length 218ft x beam 37ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 9 knots, accommodation for 40-1st, 100-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 27th Jul.1855 by Fabrique Royale de Machines de Paul Van Vlissingen & Drudock van Hell, Amsterdam for Societe Belge des Bateaux a Vapeur Transatlantiques (Belgian Transatlantic Steam Navigation Co.). On 1st Sep.1856 she arrived in Hartlepool for inspection and overhaul and commenced her maiden voyage Antwerp - Southampton - New York on 23rd Nov.1856. Her third and last voyage started 17th Jun.1857 Antwerp - Southampton - New York (arr.2/7 - dep.16/7) - Southampton - Antwerp. She was then renamed PRINCESS CHARLOTTE for Belgian owners and on 15th Oct.1857 sailed Southampton - Queenstown - India with troops. 1858 laid up at Antwerp. 16th Sep.1861 sailed to Southampton where she was renamed ENGLAND for Jose Yglesias, London. On 13th Feb.1862 she sailed from Southampton for Cadiz, Spain where she was sold to A. Lopez y Cia. and renamed CANARIAS. On 31st Oct.1871 she caught fire and was beached on Santa Maria, Azores and became a total loss.

CONTE DI SAVOIA 1931
Built by Cantieri Riuniti dell'Adriatico, Monfalcone in 1931 for Lloyd Sabaudo, she was a 48,502 gross ton ship, overall length 814.6ft x beam 96.1ft, two funnels, two masts, four screws and a speed of 27 knots. There was accommodation for 360-1st, 375-special, 400-tourist and 922-3rd class passengers. Launched on 28/10/1931, she was transferred to Italia Line (which was an amalgamation of three former independent lines) in January 1932. She was one of the first ships to be fitted with gyro-stabilizers which, it was claimed, maximized her rolling to three degrees. She sailed from Genoa on her maiden voyage to Villefranche and New York on 30/11/1932 and in April 1936, her special class accommodation became tourist class. On 25/5/1940 she started her last crossing from New York to Italy and was then laid up near Venice until 1943 when she became a troopship. She was sunk in shallow water at Venice by British bombers on 11/9/1943, refloated on 16/10/1945, sold and scrapped at Monfalcone in 1950. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4, p.1618]

CONTE ROSSO 1921
The CONTE ROSSO was built in 1921 by W.Beardmore & Co, Ltd for Lloyd Sabaudo of Italy. Her details were - 18,017 gross tons, length overall 588.2ft x beam 74.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was accommodation for 342-1st, 214-2nd and 1,800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 10/2/1921, she sailed from Genoa on her maiden voyage to Naples and South America on 29/3/1922. After this voyage, she commenced sailings from Genoa to Naples and New York on 15/5/1922. In 1925 accommodation for 188-economic 2nd class passengers was added and on 27/2/1928 she commenced her last Genoa - New York crossing. Subsequently she was used on the South America service, and in 1932 was taken over by Lloyd Triestino. On 24/5/1941 she was torpedoed and sunk by the British submarine HMS UPHOLDER while 10 miles from Sicily, with the loss of 1,212 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1368]

CONTE VERDE / KOTOBUKI MARU 1923
18,765 gross tons, length 559ft x beam 74.1ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, service speed 18.5 knots, accommodation for 230-1st, 290-2nd and 1,880-3rd class passengers. Crew 440. Built by Beardmore, Glasgow, she was launched for Lloyd Sabaudo, Genoa on 21st Oct.1922 and started her maiden voyage from Genoa for Buenos Aires on 21st Apr.1923. First voyage Genoa - New York started 13th Jun.1923. In Jan.1932 she was transferred to 'Italia' Flotta Riunte, Genoa and on 28th Aug.1932 started her first Trieste - Shanghai voyage. Later the same year, her ownership passed to Lloyd Triestino, Trieste and her accommodation was refitted to carry 250-1st, 170-2nd and 220-3rd class passengers. On 2nd Sep.1937 she went ashore on Cape Collinson off Hong Kong in a typhoon, and was refloated with great difficulty. Laid up at Shanghai in 1940, she made a few voyages in 1942 as a prisoner of war exchange ship between Japan and China on charter to the Japanese Government. After the Italian surrender, the ship was scuttled by the crew on 9th Sep.1942 at Shanghai before the Japanese could take possession of it. Salvaged and taken to Japan after temporary repairs, she was refitted as a Japanese troop transport and renamed KOTOBUKI MARU. On 8th May 1945 she was sunk near Maizuru at 34.30N 126.30E following a US air raid (believed sunk by mine laid by aircraft). Refloated in Jan.1949 and scrapped in Japan by Mitsui in 1951.[Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.2] [The World's Merchant Fleets 1939 by Roger Jordan]

CORCOVADO / SUEH / GUGLIELMO PEIRCE / MARIA CHRISTINA / MOUZINHO 1907
The GUGLIELMO PEIRCE was built by Germania Werft (Krupp), Kiel in 1907 as the CORCOVADO for the Hamburg America Line. She was a 8,099 gross ton ship, length 448.3ft x beam 55.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 1,160-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21/12/1907 for the South American service, she started her first Hamburg - New York voyage on 19/10/1912. On 12/3/1914 she commenced her first Hamburg - Philadelphia crossing and on 15/4/1914 sailed on the New York - Mediterranean - Black Sea service. She started her first voyage from Odessa to Batum, Constantinople, Smyrna, Piraeus and New York on 20/5/1914 (3 round voyages on N.Atlantic). On 26/7/1914 she arrived at Odessa and became an accommodation ship at Constantinople. In 1915 she was transferred to Turkish ownership and was renamed SUEH and in 1919 was surrendered to France and went back to her original name of CORCOVADO. In 1920 she went to Sicula Americana of Naples and was named GUGLIELMO PEIRCE. She was used on the Naples - S.America service until she was transferred to the Naples - New York service on 9/12/1920. On 5/11/1923 she started her 14th and last crossing on this service and in 1926 was chartered to the Cosulich Line of Trieste. In 1927 she was sold to Lloyd Sabaudo of Genoa who renamed her MARIA CHRISTINA and in 1930 was sold to Cia Colonial, Lisbon and renamed MOUZINHO. She was used on their Lisbon - Angola - Mozambique service and in June and August 1941 made two round voyages between Lisbon and New York. She was scrapped at Savona in 1954 [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.414] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

CORDILLERA 1932
The CORDILLERA was a motorship built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1932 for the Caribbean service of the Hamburg America Line. She was a 12,051 gross ton cargo vessel, length 497.8ft x beam 65.8ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. On March 12th 1945 she was bombed and sunk by the RAF at Swinemunde, raised in 1949, she was repaired and ceded to the USSR. In 1951 she was renamed RUSS. I have no subsequent information on this ship. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4,Hamburg America Line]

COREAN 1881
This was a 3,488 gross ton ship, length 360.1ft x beam 41ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. She carried 1st and 3rd class passengers. Built by Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland, she was launched in Feb.1881 for the Allan Line and started her maiden voyage on 10th May 1881 when she sailed from Glasgow for Quebec and Montreal. On 30th Apr.1885 she commenced her first London - Quebec - Montreal sailing and started her last sailing on this route on 19th Sep.1887. Her last Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailing started on 1st Nov.1891 and on 4th Mar.1892 she commenced Glasgow - New York voyages. Her last voyage on this service started on 27th Jan.1905 and her last Glasgow - Boston voyage started 2st Jun.1907. She was scrapped in Italy in 1908. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.,p.316]

CORFU / CORFU MARU 1931
The CORFU was a 14,293 gross ton ship, length 522.5ft x beam 71.4ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 18 knots, accommodation as built for 177-1st, 214-2nd class passengers. Refitted 1949 for 181-1st and 213-tourist class. Launched on 20th May 1931 by A. Stephen & Sons, Glasgow for P & O Line's London - Bombay - China service and delivered on 24th Sep.1931. Requisitioned by the Admiralty and converted to an Armed Merchant Cruiser in 1939, her after funnel was removed and she was armed with 6 inch and 12 pounder guns. In Feb.1944 she was returned to her owners for use as a troopship and converted at Mobile, Alabama. July 1947 released for commercial service and refitted at Glasgow, she re-entered service in Jan.1949. 24th Mar.1961 sold to Mitsui Bussan Kaisha, Japan for demolition at London and renamed CORFU MARU for her delivery voyage to Japanese breakers and scrapped at Osaka. [P & O, A Fleet History by S. Rabson & K. O'Donoghue]

CORINTHIA / ORANJE NASSAU 1911
Built in 1911 by Koninklijke Mij de Schelde, Flushing as the ORANJE NASSAU for the Dutch owned Royal West Indian Mail Service. This was a 3,721 gross ton ship, length 337.6ft x beam 44.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 46-1st and 16-2nd class passengers. Launched on 5th Apr.1911, she left Amsterdam on 22nd Jul.1911 on her maiden voyage to Paramaribo, Demarara, Trinidad and New York(arr.3rd Sep.) In 1919 she was refitted to accommodate 56-1st, 16-2nd and 21-3rd class passengers. Her last voyage commenced 22nd Nov.1938 when she sailed from Amsterdam for New York and Amsterdam and she was sold to Greek owners the following year and renamed CORINTHIA. I don't have any info on what routes she was employed on after this date, but she was scrapped at Genoa in 1959. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1183]

CORINTHIAN 1870 see DAMASCUS 1856

CORINTHIAN 1900
The CORINTHIAN was the second ship of that name owned by the Allan Line of Liverpool. Built in 1900 by Workman, Clark & Co Ltd, Belfast, she was a 6,227 gross ton ship, length 430ft x beam 54.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st, 150-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 19/3/1900 she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 24/5/1900. On 23/5/1903 she transferred to the Glasgow - Quebec and Montreal service and in 1908 she was rebuilt to 7,333 tons with accommodation for 280-2nd and 900-3rd class passengers. In April 1908 she commenced her last Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage and on 9/5/1908 sailed on her first run from Montreal to Quebec and London. She left London for Quebec and Montreal on 10/9/1914 and on the return voyage was used as a Canadian Expeditionary Force troopship. She later continued on the London - Canada service and in 1917 went to Canadian Pacific when they took over Allan Line. On 21/11/1918 she commenced her first voyage after the armistice from London to St John NB but on 14th Dec. she was wrecked in the Bay of Funday with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.321]

CORINTHIC 1902
The CORINTHIC was a 12,231 gross ton ship, length 152,40m x beam 19,29m (500ft x 63.3ft), one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. She had accomodation for 121-1st, 117-2nd and 450-3rd class passengers and was equipped with refrigerated holds for the carriage of frozen meat. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched for Shaw Savill & Albion - White Star Line joint service to New Zealand on 10th Apr.1902. Her maiden voyage started on 20th Nov.1902 when she left London for Cape Town and Wellington. Taken over under the Liner Requisition Scheme in 1917 and returned to her owners in 1920. On 20th Jan.1920 she resumed service on the UK - Panama - Wellington route and in 1923 rescued the crew of the Newfoundland schooner MARGUERITE RYAN. In 1926 she raced the New Zealand Shipping Co ship REMUERA outbound to NZ and the ships were virtually in sight of each other all the way. She commenced her last sailing from Southampton to Wellington on 14th Aug.1931 and in Dec.1931 was sold to Hughes Bolckow for scrap and was broken up at Wallsend-on-Tyne. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M. Maber][Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.10, Shaw, Savill & Albion]

CORNWALL / HASSAN PASHA 1873
The CORNWALL was built by Richardson, Duck & Co, Stockton (engines by Blaird & Co, Stockton) in 1873. She was a 1,872 gross ton ship, length 280ft x beam 35.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 34-1st, 99-intermediate and 122-3rd class. Launched on 22nd Oct.1873 for the Great Western Steamship Co of Bristol, she started her maiden voyage 31st Jan.1873 when she left Middlesborough for New York and Bristol. On 15th Apr.1874 she commenced her first Bristol - New York sailing and continued on this service until May 1885 when she started her last voyage between Bristol, Swansea (dep.11/5) and New York. In Oct.1885 she was sold to Turkish owners and renamed HASSAN PASHA. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.784]

CORNWALL / ATLANTIDE 1896
The CORNWALL was a 5,490 gross ton ship, length 420ft x beam 54ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 11 knots. Accommodation for 12-1st and 150-3rd class passengers. Built by R.& W. Hawthorn Leslie, Hebburn on Tyne for the Federal Steam Navigation Co, she was delivered in Nov.1896. Used on the UK - Australia and New Zealand - UK service with frozen produce. Between 1899-1902 she was used as a transport ship for New Zealand troops during the Boer War and was sold to Italy in 1913 and renamed ATLANTIDE. Torpedoed and sunk in 1918.[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.7, New Zealand Shipping & Federal S.N.Co.]

CORNWALL 1920
10,616 gross tons, length 495.1ft x beam 63ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots, refrigerated cargo space. Built 1920 by Wm. Hamilton & Co., Port Glasgow for the Federal Steam Navigation Co. which was a subsidiary of New Zealand Shipping Co. Later the same year, she was adapted for the Manchester Ship Canal with collapsible topmasts and funnel. 1933 acted briefly as the cadet training ship for the company. 31st Aug.1940 damaged by bombs from three Italian aircraft, 6 miles from Elephonisio Island south of Crete on passage Alexandria - Malta in company with two other merchant ships. Her steering gear out of action, CORNWALL steered to Malta using her engines only. 26th Nov.1940 after repairs at Malta, she sailed for Port Said and Australia. 18th Dec.1948 arrived UK and decommissioned. 1949 scrapped at Avonmouth. [Merchant Fleets, vol.7 by Duncan Haws]

COROMANDEL 1885
4,359 gross tons, length 400.3ft x beam 45.2ft (122,02m x 13,77m), one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), steel construction, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 107-1st and 44-2nd class passengers. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock for the P&O Line in 1885, she was one of four sister ships designed for the Indian service, but capable of acting as relief steamers on the Australian route. They were also constructed so that they could be speedily converted to troopships or Armed Merchant Cruisers for use in the Pacific. Her maiden voyage started on 27th Jul.1885 when she sailed from Southampton for Colombo and Calcutta. On 17th Dec.1885 she started the first of four London - Colombo - Melbourne - Sydney sailings. Used as a troopship in 1895 and later as a hospital ship during the Ashanti Wars, she also collided with the steamer CYCLE off Eddystone Light the same year. Sold to the Shah Steam Nav.Co, Bombay in 1905, she was used for the Indian pilgrimage trade to Jeddah until 1908 when she was scrapped at Bombay. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O, Orient and Blue Anchor Lines]

CORRIENTES / HMS TRACKER 1951
12,053 gross tons, length 468.4ft x beam 69.7ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 16 knots, accommodation for 4-1st and 1,338 tourist class passengers. Built by the Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corporation, she was laid down in 1941 as the MORMACMAIL for Moore-McCormack Lines, but was launched on 7th Mar.1942 as an aircraft carrier for the US Navy. 1943 transferred to the Royal Navy and renamed HMS TRACKER. 1949 sold to Compania Argentina de Navegacion Dodero, Buenos Aires, refitted as a passenger ship at Newport News and renamed CORRIENTES. 1951 Placed on the Buenos Aires - Genoa service. 1955 transferred to Flota Argentina de Navegacion de Ultramar. 1962 transferred to Empresa Lineas Maritimas Argentinas. 1st Aug.1964 arrived at Lisbon with serious machinery damage. 14th Sep.1964 arrived at Antwerp where she was scrapped. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

CORSICAN / MARVALE 1907
The CORSICAN was built by Barclay, Curle & Co. Ltd, Glasgow in 1907 for the Allan Line of Liverpool. She was a 11,419 gross ton vessel, length 500.3ft x beam 61.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was acommodation for 208-1st, 298-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29th April 1907, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal on 11th July 1907. In 1908 she was chartered to Canadian Pacific and commenced sailing for them on the same service in Jan.1908. On 12th August 1912 she collided with an iceberg near Belle Isle and sustained slight damage and in Jan.1914 commenced her last Liverpool - St John NB voyage for Canadian Pacific. On 18th April 1914 she began sailings between Glasgow, Quebec and Montreal, commencing her last voyage on 11th July 1914 and in August of that year began trooping voyages between Southampton and Havre. In September 1914 she was transferred to trooping to Alexandria and Bombay and various trooping duties and in 1917 was returned to Canadian Pacific which by that time had taken over the Allan Line. Sailings commenced on 24th August 1918 from London to Quebec and Montreal and on 30th January 1919 she resumed the Liverpool - St John NB service and subsequently the Glasgow, London, Liverpool or Antwerp to Canada run. On 16th November 1922 she was renamed MARVALE and her accommodation altered to Cabin and 3rd class only and on 26th April 1923 commenced her last voyage from Glasgow to Belfast, Quebec and Montreal but on 21st May 1923 she was wrecked near Cape Race with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor.vol.1,p.323]

COSTA RICA VICTORY / GROOTE BEER / MARIANNA IV 1944
Built by Permanente Metals Corporation, Richmond, Calif. in 1944, she was a standard wartime type 'Victory' ship. - 9,140 gross tons, length 455.3ft x beam 62.1ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was capacity for 828 one-class passengers. Launched on 17/6/1944 as the COSTA RICA VICTORY she was used as a US Army transport and in 1952 was sold to the Netherlands Government for use as an emigrant ship. Managed by the Holland America Line, she was renamed GROOTE BEER (Great Bear) and on 18/6/1952 she commenced her first Rotterdam - Halifax - New York voyage. In August 1952 she made her first Rotterdam - Quebec sailing and in August 1965 made the last of 105 round voyages when she sailed from Rotterdam for New York. Sold to Greek owners in 1965, she made four educational cruises between June and August 1966. In 1969 she was renamed MARIANNA IV and in 1971 was scrapped at Eleusis, Greece. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1688]

COTE D'ARGENT 1932
3,047 gross tons, length 99.29m x beam 13.72m, twin screw, speed 22 knots, capacity for 1,000 passengers. Built 1932 by Forges & Chantier de la Mediteranee, Le Havre for Societe Anonyme de Gerance et d'Armement for the Calais - Dover service. On 26th July 1940 she was at La Pallice on evacuation duties but her departure was delayed by mines and she was captured by German forces on 30th in a disabled condition. On 5th Oct.1941 she was commissioned as an Admiral's flag and accommodation ship and renamed OSTMARK. Based in the Baltic, she was sunk off Anholt, Denmark on 21st Apr.1945 by British bombers.

COTSWOLD RANGE 1912
(4248 gross tons) built for the Neptune Steam Navigation Co in 1912. She was sold to Norway in 1914 and renamed TRONDHJEMSFJORD. Sunk by the German U.Boat U.41 on 28th Jul.1915. Neptune SN Co was owned by Furness Withy at the time.

COURRIER 1847
255 gross tons, 167ft x 22.5ft x 10.6ft, clipper bows, two funnels, two masts, side paddle wheel propulsion, capacity for 265 passengers. Built 1847 by Ditchburn & Mare, Blackwall for the New South Western Steam Packet Co., Southampton for their Southampton - Channel Islands service. In most records her name is shown as COURIER, but she actually bore the name COURRIER throughout her life. She made her maiden voyage on 12th Nov.1847 and sailed Southampton - Guernsey in 7 hrs 10 mins. Refitted and re-boilered in 1852. 1859 used on the Southampton - Portland - Weymouth service. July 1863 transferred to London & South Western Railway Co. and placed on the Le Havre route. 1885 scrapped. [Merchant Fleets, vol.24 by Duncan Haws]

CRANLEY / CAMETA 1903
The CRANLEY - 4644 tons, built 1903 by D & W.Henderson, Glasgow for Century Shipping Co, London. 1906 sold to Belgium renamed CAMETA. 1908 resold to Century reverted to CRANLEY. July 1915 purchased by Anglo-Newfoundland Steamship Co (Donaldson Bros Ltd, Managers). 1916 transferred to Anglo- Newfoundland Development Co Ltd (Donaldson Bros Ltd, Managers). 8th Jan.1931 sold to T.W.Ward and scrapped at Briton Ferry.[Donaldson Line by P.J.Telford]

CREFELD / ESPANA No.4 / TEIDE 1895
The CREFELD was a 3,829 gross ton ship, built in 1895 by A.G.Vulcan, Stettin for North German Lloyd. Her details were - length 355.5ft x beam 43.7ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Accommodation for 32-2nd and 1,013-3rd class passengers. Launched on 23rd Mar.1895, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Bremen to Rio de Janeiro and Santos on 11th May 1895. On 12th Sep.1895 she started her first Bremen - New York voyage and on 10th Sep.1896 commenced her first Bremen - Baltimore sailing. Her last North Atlantic sailing started on 13th Mar.1902 (19 round voyages on the North Atlantic) and she commenced a single round voyage between Bremen and Galveston on 19th Apr.1902. She was subsequently used on the South America service, and on the outbreak of the Great War she took refuge in Tenerife. Handed to Spain in 1918, she was renamed ESPANA No.4 and in 1925 came under the ownership of Cia Trasatlantica who renamed her TEIDE. On 10th Jun.1932 she was wrecked at Barta, Spanish Guinea. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.558]

CREFELD 1921
The second CREFELD was built by Flensburger Schiffbau, Flensburg in 1921 for North German Lloyd. She was a 9,573 gross ton ship, length 474.2ft x beam 60.9ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 100-cabin and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 23/12/1921, I have no details of her service until June 1928 when she commenced sailings between Bremen and Montreal. She started her ninth and last round voyage on this route on 24/5/1930 and commenced the first of two Bremen - Halifax - Galveston crossings in June 1930. In 1934 she was rebuilt as a 8,045 ton cargo steamer and on 4/4/1941 was scuttled at Massaua, Eritrea. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.573]

CRETIC 1903 see HANOVERIAN 1902

CRIJNSSEN 1918
The CRIJNSSEN was a 4,321 gross ton passenger ship, length 342.9ft x beam 47.8ft, single screw, speed 12 knots. Built 1918 by Mij. Fijenoord, Rotterdam (Yard No.283) for Konink. West-Indische Maildienst (Royal West Indies Mail Service), Amsterdam. In 1927 the company was taken over by Konink. Nederland. Stoomboot Mij (Royal Netherlands SS Co), Amsterdam. 10th Jun.1942 torpedoed and sunk by U.504 while on voyage Curacao - New Orleans with passengers.

CRISTOBAL 1939
CRISTOBAL was US registered. She was a 10,021 gross ton vessel, length 493ft x beam 64ft, one funnel, twin screw, speed 17 knots and built with accommodation for 202-1st class passengers. Built by Bethlehem Steel Co, Quincy, Mass, she was launched for Panama Railroad on 4th Mar.1939. Her maiden voyage from New York to Cristobal started 17th Aug.1939 and in Jan.1942 she was commissioned as a US Army Transport. Handed back to Panama RR on 14th Jun.1946 and rebuilt in 1948 to 9978 gross tons. In 1953 the company was renamed Panama Canal Co and in 1962 the ship's home port became New Orleans. Her final voyage took place in Sep.1981 and in November she was sold for scrapping at Brownsville, Texas. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.4, ISBN 0-85059-253-4 contains photo]

CRISTOFORO COLOMBO 1952
29,083 gross tons, length 700ft x beam 90.2ft, twin screw, speed 24 knots, accommodation for 202-1st, 244-cabin class and 703-tourist passengers. Launched 10th May 1952 by Soc. Anon Ansaldo, Sestri Ponente for Italia Line, she started her maiden voyage on 15th Jul.1954 from Genoa to Naples - Cannes - Gibraltar and New York. 1965 transferred to the Trieste -Venice - Piraeus - Messina - Palermo - Naples - Halifax - New York service. 1971 collided with the ANA MAFALDO at Lisbon and sent to Trieste for repairs. 1973 transferred to the Genoa - Naples - Cannes - Barcelona - Lisbon - Rio de Janeiro - Santos - Montevideo - Buenos Aires service. 1977 sold to Venezuela where she became a workers' accommodation ship at Puerto Ordaz. 1981 towed to Kaohsiung, Taiwan and scrapped. She was a sister ship to the ill fated ANDREA DORIA.

CUBA 1864
The CUBA was a 2,668 gross ton ship, length 338.2ft x beam 42.4ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 300-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21st Jul.1864 by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow for Cunard SS Co., she started her maiden voyage from Liverpool on 3rd Dec.1864 for Queenstown and New York. On 12th May 1866 she started her first Liverpool - Queenstown - Halifax - Boston voyage and on 8th Feb.1868 resumed New York sailings. Her last voyage commenced 17th Apr.1875 and she was then sold, renamed EARL OF BEACONSFIELD, engines removed and rigged as a four masted barque. On 6th Nov.1887 she was wrecked near Aldbrough, Yorkshire.

CUBA 1923
11,337 gross tons, length 476ft x beam 52.3ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 280-1st, 50-2nd, 76-3rd and 680-steerage class passengers. Completed Apr.1923 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Necastle (Yard No.1108) for Cie. Generale Transatlantique, St. Nazaire's Mexico service, she sailed on her maiden voyage St. Nazaire - West Indies - Vera Cruz on 5th May 1923. On 24th Oct.1940 while on voyage Martinique to Casablanca, she was intercepted by HMS MORETON BAY west of the Canary Islands and brought into Freetown. Operated by the Ministry of War Transport, managed by Cunard White Star Line, she was torpedoed and sunk on 6th Apr.1945 by the U.1195 in the English Channel at position 50.36N 00.57W while on voyage Havre to Southampton. The survivors were rescued by HMS NENE, 1 crew member lost. [Register of Merchant Ships Completed in 1923 by Starke / Schell] [Great Passenger Ships of the World, vol.2 by Arnold Kludas, ISBN 0-85059-242-9 contains two excellent photos of the ship]

CUZCO 1871
The CUZCO was built by John Elder & Co, Glasgow in 1871 for the South American service of the Pacific Steam Navigation Co. She was a 3,898 gross ton ship, length 117,09m x beam 12,62m (384.2ft x 41.4ft), clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw, with a service speed of 12 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 72-1st, 92-2nd and 265-3rd class. Launched on 18.10.1871, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Rio de Janeiro, Montevideo and Valparaiso on 13.1.1872. In 1877 she was chartered by Anderson, Anderson & Co and sailed from London for Melbourne and Sydney on 25th September 1877. She was bought in 1878 by the Orient Steam Navigation Co and was re-engined in 1888 to give her a service speed of 15 knots. She commenced her last London - Sydney voyage on 23.5.1902 and was scrapped at Genoa in 1905.[North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

CYCLOPS 1880
2,064 gross tons, length 320ft x beam 34.3ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw, accommodation for 35 passengers.
Built 1880 by Scott & Co., Greenock for Ocean SS Co., Liverpool and used mainly on U.K. - Far East service. 1894 transferred to Ocean's Dutch subsidiary company N.S.M. Ocean. 1902 sold to Uruguay renamed IBERIA. 1904 scrapped at Montevideo.

CYGNUS / BRIGADIER 1854
245 gross tons, length 182ft x beam 21.4ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, side paddle wheel propulsion. Built 1854 as the CYGNUS by James Henderson & Co., Renfrew (engines by McNabb & Clark) for the North of Europe S.N. Co.'s Harwich - Antwerp service. In 1856 this unsuccessful service closed and she was laid up at Lowestoft. 1857 chartered by the Weymouth & Channel Islands Steam Packet Co. and made her first sailing on this route on Apr.17th. In Nov. she was purchased by this company and modified. In 1889 the company was absorbed into the Great Western Railway Co., but the CYGNUS was considered too old and was sold to Alfred Tolhorst, Gravesend, but immediately passed to T. Holden, Southport for Mersey excursion work to Southport Pier. 1891 sold to David MacBrayne, rebuilt and 1892 renamed BRIGADIER for the Glasgow - Inverary service, later stationed at Oban. 1896 Used on the Portree - Hebrides service. 7th Dec.1896 wrecked on Duncan's Rock near Rodel, Island of Harris. [Merchant Fleets, vol.26 by Duncan Haws]

CYMRIC 1897
12,552 gross tons, length 585.5ft x beam 64.3ft, two funnels, three masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. Accommodation for 150-1st and 1,160-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched for the White Star Line on 12th Oct.1897. Her maiden voyage started on 11th Feb.1898 when she left Liverpool for New York. In 1900 she made two voyages to South Africa as a Boer War transport and on 6th Nov.1903 she started her last Liverpool - New York voyage. She transferred to Liverpool - Boston voyages on 10th Dec.1903 and her 1st class accommodation was re-classified as 2nd class. On 20th Dec.1914 she resumed the Liverpool - New York route and commenced her final voyage on 13th Apr.1916. She was torpedoed by the German submarine U.20 while 140 miles NW of Fastnet on 8th May 1916 and sank the following day with the loss of five lives.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.760]

CYRENIA / MAUNGANUI 1911
The CYRENIA was built by Fairfield of Glasgow in 1911 as the MAUNGANUI for the Union Steamship Co of New Zealand. She was a 7,527 gross ton ship with a speed of 14 knots. She was built for the Inter colonial service but from 1922-36 was used mainly on the San Francisco service, but carried out two relief sailings to Vancouver in 1927. In 1947 she was sold to the Cia. Nav.del Atlantico (Panama) and renamed CYRENIA. Later the same year she was transferred to the Hellenic Mediterranean Lines Ltd and reconditioned for the emigrant service between Genoa, Malta, Piraeus and Melbourne. Laid up for some months in 1952 she subsequently re-entered service on the Piraeus - Melbourne route and was eventually sold in Feb.1957 and broken up at Savona. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

CZAR / ESTONIA / PULASKI / EMPIRE PENRYN 1912
The CZAR was a 6,503 gross ton ship, built by Barclay, Curle & Co, Glasgow in 1912 for the Russian American Line. Her details were - length 425ft x beam 53.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 260-2nd and 1,086-3rd & 4th class passengers. Launched on 23rd March 1912, she sailed from Libau on her maiden voyage to Copenhagen and New York on 30th May 1912. Her last voyage on this service started on 17th Jul.1914 and on 13th Sep.1914 she commenced Archangel - New York sailings. After the Russian revolution, she was transferred to British registry and placed under the management of the Cunard SS Co. and in 1921 was returned to the East Asiatic Co of Copenhagen (owners of the Russian American Line). They renamed her ESTONIA and placed her on the transatlantic service under the description of Baltic American Line. On 11th Jan.1921 she sailed from Glasgow for New York, Danzig and Libau, and on 23rd Feb.1921 commenced Libau - Danzig - Boston - New York sailings. In Feb.1925 she was refitted to accommodate 290-cabin and 500-3rd class passengers and in Mar.1926 was again altered to 110-cabin, 180-tourist and 500-3rd class. Her last Danzig - Copenhagen - Halifax - New York voyage started on 31st Jan.1930 and she was then sold to the Polish owned Gdynia-America Line. On 13th Mar.1930 she started a single round voyage between Danzig, Copenhagen, Halifax and New York and was then renamed PULASKI. She started sailing between Danzig, Halifax and New York under this name on 25th Apr.1930 and commenced her last N.Atlantic voyage - Gdynia - Copenhagen - Halifax - New York on 18th Aug.1935. Transferred to the Gdynia - Buenos Aires service on 28th Feb.1936 and started her last voyage on this route on 21st Apr.1939. On 24th Aug.1939, just before the outbreak of WWII, she sailed from Gdynia for Falmouth and was used as a troopship during WWII, was renamed EMPIRE PENRYN under British registry in 1946 and was scrapped at Blyth in 1949. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.3, p.1356; vol.4, p.1511-12] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, p.465]

C Descriptions C/CA to CH | CI to CZ

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