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SHIP DESCRIPTIONS - S

S Descriptions SAA to SK | SL to SY

Please note that ships often changed hands and names many times. If an entry is just the name of the vessel followed by a "see..." then that vessel was renamed and you will find the full history under the redirected name.

SAALE / J. L. LUCKENBACH / PRINCESS / MADISON 1886
4,967 gross tons, length 439.6ft x beam 48.1ft, two funnels, four masts, single screw and a speed of 17 knots. Accommodation for 150-1st, 90-2nd and 1,000-steerage class passengers. Built by Fairfield Co, Glasgow, she was launched for North German Lloyd of Bremen on 21st Apr.1886. Her maiden voyage from Bremen to Southampton and New York started 18th Aug.1886 and in 1896-97 she was refitted and her masts reduced to two. On 30th Jun.1900 she was severely damaged in a dock fire at New York with the loss of 109 lives and was subsequently sold. She then came under US ownership and was renamed J.L.LUCKENBACH and used as a cargo steamer. In 1921 she became the PRINCESS (US), and in 1923 became the MADISON (US). She was scrapped in Italy in 1924. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.553]

SAARBRUCKEN 1923 see TOSCANA 1935

SABOR 1920
5,212 gross ton cargo ship, length 400.4ft x beam 52.2ft, single screw, speed 10 knots. Built 1920 by Earle's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Hull, she was laid down as the WAR WHALE for the Shipping Controller, but completed for Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. as the SABOR. She was based on a standard world war I design. In 1932 the company became Royal Mail Lines Ltd. On 7th Mar.1943 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.506 (Wurdemann) in the South Atlantic in position 34.30S 23.10E on voyage Port Said - Mombasa - Tamatave - Durban - Cape Town - Rio de Janeiro. The Master, Capt. P. M. Burrell, 41 crew and 9 gunners were rescued by South African Air Force crash launch No.8 and landed at Mossel Bay. 7 crew were lost.

SAGAING 1925
7,994 gross tons, 454.6ft x 61.2ft, single screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 137-1st class passengers. Launched 24th Dec.1924 by Wm. Denny & Bros., Dumbarton for P. Henderson & Co., she was used on the UK - Burma service. On 9th Apr.1942 while at anchor at Trincomalee she was bombed by Japanese carrier aircraft and set on fire. Abandoned, she drifted into Malay Cove where she was sunk by shellfire aimed below the waterline. The ship was sunk but most of the cargo of aircraft and ammunition was saved. [Merchant Fleets, vol.29 by Duncan Haws]

SAGHALIEN 1880
4,050 gross ton ship, length 429ft x beam 39.7ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 89-1st, 58-2nd and 36-3rd class passengers. Launched on 25th July 1880 at La Ciotat for Compagnie des Messageries Maritimes, Marseilles for their Marseilles - Far East service. 16th Feb.1883 transferred temporarily to the Marseilles - Australia route and on 19th July 1883 she rescued the crew of George Gibson & Co., Leith ship CONSOLATION wrecked on Gardafui Island in the Red Sea. 29th Nov.1886 rammed and severely damaged by Pacific Mail SS Co., San Francisco's CITY OF PEKING at Hong Kong, but repaired there. 1887/8 reboilered and fitted with electric lights. Aug.1914 sent to rescue French citizens from Turkey before Turkey entered the Great War. 10th Nov. 1915 scuttled with the old French battleship MASSENA at Seddul Bahr to form a mole for the Dardanelles landings.

SAID 1863
1,744 gross tons, length 275.5ft x beam 32.8ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), single screw, speed 11 knots. Launched 18th Oct.1863 at La Ciotat for Messageries Maritimes, Marseilles, one of three sister ships (SAID, MOERIS and PELUSE) for the company's Mediterranean services. 1869 lengthened to 328.8ft, 1,829 tons. 25th Oct.1869 suffered an engine breakdown and towed to ALEXANDRIA by LA SEYNE for repairs. Feb.1890 sold for 105,000 French francs and scrapped at Marseilles. [Merchant Fleets, vol.36 by Duncan Haws]

SAINT GERMAIN 1876 see KLOPSTOCK 1874

SAINT LAURENT 1866
Built by Chantier de Penhoet, St Nazaire in 1866 and laid down as a paddle steamer but modified to a screw steamer while under construction, for Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line). This was a 3,413 gross ton ship, two funnels, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Launched on 19th Apr.1866, she commenced her maiden voyage on 11th Oct.1866 when she left Havre for Brest and New York. In 1875-6, she was re-engined by Schneider, Creuzot and started her last Havre - New York voyage on 10th Jul.1886. On 22nd Sep.1886 she transferred to Havre - Panama sailings, was rebuilt to 3,945 gross tons and re-engined in 1887-8 and was finally scrapped at Genoa in 1902. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.653]

SAINT LAURENT 1905
The SAINT LAURENT was the second ship of that name owned by Compagnie Generale Transatlantique (French Line). Built by Chantiers de Normandie, Grand Quevilly in 1905, she was a 5,607 gross ton ship, length 392.2ft x beam 50.6ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 25-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 19/5/1905, she commenced her first Havre - New York voyage on 10/2/1906 and her 37th and last sailing on this service started on 3/1/1914. On 5/2/1917 she caught fire in Malta harbour when loaded with explosives, and was sunk by torpedo to avoid an explosion. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.659]

SAINT LOUIS (1) see ST. LOUIS / CHEANG CHEW 1870

SAINT LOUIS (2) see ST. LOUIS / LOUISVILLE 1894

SAINT PAUL 1895
The "St Paul" together with her sister ship "St Louis" were the first American built screw express steamers. She was a steel vessel built in 1895 by W.Cramp & Sons of Philadelphia for the American Line. Her dimensions were 11,629 gross tons, length 535.5ft x beam 63ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 350-1st class, 220-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. She was launched on 10.04.1895 and left New York on her maiden voyage to Southampton on 09.10.1895. In 1896 the funnels were heightened. In 1898 she was used as an auxiliary cruiser in the Spanish - American war and in Oct. of the same year resumed the NY - Southampton service. On 25.4.1908 collision in Solent with British cruiser "Gladiator," which sunk 0n27.4.1908. . On 25.7.1914 she made her last voyage from Southampton - Cherbourg - Queenstown [Cobh] - New York and was transferred to the NY - Liverpool service and stayed on this run until April 1918. . In 1913 she was refitted to carry 2nd and 3rd class passengers. On 25.4.1918 she capsized at the dock in New York. She was salvaged and then became the US Government ship "Knoxville". Her first postwar voyage as the "St. Paul" (New York - Plymouth - Cherbourg - Southampton) with 516 cabin and 500 third class passengers). Her final voyage was 2.9.1922 Hamburg - new York. In September 1923 she was towed from New york to Germany, where she was scrapped

SALADIN 1856
was a 510 gross ton steamship, built 1856 by Cato, Miller & Co., Liverpool for Alfred Holt & Co. (Blue Funnel Line). her dimensions were 184ft x 24.3ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), single propeller, speed 8 knots. Originally used on the Liverpool - West Indies service, probably to Jamaica. In 1864 Holt sold the West Indies service and she transferred to West India & Pacific SS Co., Liverpool which sailed to the West Indies and Central America.. 1865 sold to Lamport & Holt's Liverpool, Brazil & River Plate Steam Navigation Co. (Lamport & Holt) 1872 owned by J. Martin & Co., Liverpool. 1882 scrapped.

SALAMIS / KAMARIMA 1899
4,508 gross tons, length 392.6ft x beam 47.2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, single screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 50-1st and 650-3rd class passengers. Built by Hall, Russell & Co, Aberdeen, she was completed in Jul.1899 as the SALAMIS for the Aberdeen Line and started her maiden voyage to Australia on 8th Aug.1899. In 1900 she transported the New South Wales Naval Brigade to Shanghai to join the International Brigade to relieve Peking in the Boxer Rebellion. 1911 sold to Andrew Weir & Co's Bank Line and used on their South Africa - India service. 1919 Purchased by the Canada Steamship Co, Montreal and renamed KAMARIMA. 1920 chartered to Compagnie Canadienne Transatlantique formed in partnership between Canada Steamships and the French Line. May 1920 placed on the Havre - Quebec - Montreal service but made only three round voyages before the St. Lawrence river iced up. She then reverted to her owners and was used on their Canada - West Indies route. 1924 Scrapped at Trieste by Cantieri Navale Triestino. [Merchant Fleets, vol.17 by Duncan Haws]

SALTA / JAMAICA / HMS SHAH 1942
12,053 gross tons, length 467.7ft x beam 69.6ft (142.54m x 21.21m), one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 16 knots, accommodation for 4-1st class and 1,338-tourist class passengers. Launched on 20th July 1942 by Seattle-Tacoma Shipbuilding Corp. for the US Navy as the aircraft carrier JAMAICA. 1943 transferred to the British Navy as HMS SHAH. 1949 purchased by Compania Argentina de Navegacion Dodero, Buenos Aires and rebuilt at Newport News, Va. as a passenger ship, renamed SALTA. 1951 used on the Buenos Aires - Genoa service with stops at intermediate ports. 1955 transferred to ownership of Flota Argentina de Navigacion de Ultramar, B.A. 1962 transferred to Empresa Lineas Maritimas Argentinas. Dec.1964 laid up at Buenos Aires. 1966 scrapped at Buenos Aires. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

SALVADOR 1879
1,056 gross tons, length 228.6ft x beam 29.8ft (69.68m x 9.08m), one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw. speed 9 knots. Built by Forges et Chantiers de la Mediteranee, Graville, she was delivered in April 1879 to Compagnie Generale Transatlantique, Havre for their local Antilles services. 1914 sold and scrapped. [Merchant Fleets, vol.30 by Duncan Haws]

SALWEEN 1938
7,063 gross tons, 462ft x 59.2ft, single screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 70-1st class passengers. Launched 22nd Oct.1937 by Wm. Denny & Bros., Dumbarton for P. Henderson's British & Burmese S.N. Co. and used on the UK - Burma service. 1941 converted by Barclay, Curle & Co. into the naval troopship HMS SALWEEN for 1,400 men and sailed to Port Said via the Cape. Later took part in the evacuation from Greece and then served in East African waters for the rest of the war. 1946 returned to the Glasgow - Birkenhead - Burma service. 1952 taken over by Elder Dempster & Co but continued the same service. 1962 scrapped at Hong Kong.[Merchant Fleets, vol.29 by Duncan Haws]

SAMARIA 1868
The SAMARIA was a 2,574 gross ton ship, length 320.6ft x beam 39.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 130-1st and 800-steerage class passengers. Built by J & G. Thomson, Glasgow, she was launched on 4th Jul.1868 for the Cunard Steamship Co. Her maiden voyage started on 29th Sep.1868 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. On 7th Mar.1871 she sailed from Liverpool on her last voyage to Queenstown, Boston and New York and on 18th Apr.1871 transferred to Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston direct voyages. Fitted with compound engines in 1878, she continued the same service until starting her last voyage on 30th Jan.1896 from Liverpool to Queenstown and Boston. She was then laid up at Liverpool until 1902 when she was sold and scrapped at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.150]

SAMARIA 1920
Built in 1920 by Cammel Laird & Co, Birkenhead for the Cunard SS Co, she was a 19,602 gross ton ship, overall length 624ft x beam 73.7ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a service speed of 16 knots. There was capacity for 350-1st, 350-2nd and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 27/11/1920, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Cobh and Boston on 19/4/1922. On 2/11/1922 she commenced her first Liverpool - Cobh - Boston - New York voyage. Her accommodation was reclassified to cabin, tourist and 3rd class in April 1929, and on 16/12/1939 she sailed from Liverpool for New York but was forced to return to port after a collision with an escorting warship. On 6th January 1941 she sailed from Liverpool to Suez as a troop ship, and in September 1948 commenced her first voyage from Cuxhaven to Havre and Quebec. She sailed between Cuxhaven and Quebec or Halifax until April 1950 when she instituted London - Quebec sailings. In the autumn of 1950 she was refitted to carry 250-1st and 650-tourist class passengers and on 14/6/1951 sailed Liverpool - Quebec - Southampton. Her first Southampton - Havre - Quebec voyage started 12/7/1951 and her last Quebec - Havre - Southampton crossing commenced 23/11/1955. In January 1956 she was scrapped at Inverkeithing. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.163]

SAMLAND / MISSISSIPPI / BELGIC 1902
The SAMLAND was built by the New York Shipbuilding Corp.,Camden, NJ in 1902 as the MISSISSIPPI for the Atlantic Transport Line. She was a 7,913 gross ton ship, length 490.4ft x beam 58.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 1,900-3rd class passengers. Launched on 15th Dec.1902, she sailed from Baltimore on 16th Apr.1903 on her maiden voyage to London. On 30th Sep.1903 she started her third and last London - Baltimore sailing and then went to the Red Star Line and commenced Antwerp - New York sailings. She was renamed SAMLAND on 24th Jul.1906 and on 1st Jan.1910 transferred from the US to Belgian flag, continuing Antwerp - New York sailings. On 7th Jan.1911 she commenced her last Antwerp - Dover - New York voyage and on 7th Apr.1911 commenced the first of two Hamburg - Antwerp - Quebec - Montreal sailings. Renamed BELGIC on 30th Aug.1911 she was used on the White Star - Australian service until 1913 when she reverted to Red Star Line and her previous name of SAMLAND. She resumed the Antwerp - New York service on 27th Dec.1913 and on 2nd Oct.1914 commenced her first London - New York sailing with cargo only, under charter to American Transport Line. Her last voyage on this route started 13th Feb.1916 and on 12th Mar.1916 she commenced the first of three or more New York - Falmouth - Rotterdam voyages for the Belgian Relief Commission. She resumed Antwerp - New York sailings on 28th Feb.1919 and on 6th Feb.1931 started her final voyage from Antwerp to New York (arr.19/2, dep.28/2), Halifax, London and Antwerp. She was scrapped the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.857-8]

SAMUEL PLIMSOLL 1873
Built in 1873 by W.Hood & Co, Aberdeen for the Aberdeen Line, she was a three masted full rigged ship of 1,520 gross tons. Length 73,53m x beam 11,88m x depth 7,04m (241.3ft x 39ft x 23.1ft), iron hull and accommodation for 50-1st class passengers carried in the poop. Fitted for the carrige of emigrants in the 'tween decks. Launched in Sep.1873 as a passenger clipper, Samuel Plimsoll was present at the launching. He had said, when presenting his case to Parliament that Thompson's Aberdeen Line was the only concern that which never loaded their ships too deeply. In gratitude at this recognition (which must have improved his trade), George Thompson named the ship after him. She was a fast ship, but was inclined to be dismasted and to lose gear. However, she proved to be a popular ship. On Dec.19th 1873 she left Plymouth with 180 emigrants and arrived at Port Jackson 1st Feb after only 74 days land to land. In 1875 when bound for Melbourne with 360 emigrants, she was in collision with, and sank the ENRICA in the English Channel, with no damage to herself. She embarked 450 emigrants at Plymouth in 1878 and made an 86 day passage to Melbourne. She then made the best return passage of the year with wool to London in 80 days. Dismasted in a tropical squall in 1880, she was repaired at sea and still arrived at Sydney in 83 days, to the surprise of the Master of an American clipper which had offered help at sea and arived at Sydney to find that the SAMUEL PLIMSOLL had beaten him to it by several days. In 1883 she sailed to Sydney in 72 days and in 1888 sailed London - Melbourne which was becoming the terminal port. She caught fire in the Thames in 1899 and was scuttled, but was re-floated in 1900 and sold to Shaw Savill & Co for their New Zealand trade. In 1902 she sailed from Glasgow for Otago and was severely dismasted off New Zealand and towed to Gisborne. Not repaired, she was towed to Sydney and in 1903 was sold as a hulk for use at various Australian ports. In this year she was at Fremantle.[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.17, Aberdeen and Aberdeen & Commonwealth Lines]

SANDOWN 1934
684 gross tons, 216ft x 29.1ft, side paddle wheel propulsion, speed 14 knots, capacity for 974 passengers. Launched 1st May 1934 by Wm. Denny & Bros, Dumbarton for the Southern Railway's Portsmouth - Ryde, Isle of Wight service. 1939 taken over as a minesweeper with the 7th Fotilla. May 1940 took part in the evacuation from Dunkirk. 1942 converted to an anti-aircraft defence ship (J.20) and based in the Firth of Forth. 6th June 1944 took part in the D-Day Landings at Normandy. 1945 refitted for the Portsmouth - Ryde service. 1948 ownership transferred to British Transport Commission. 1955 laid up at Newhaven. Feb.1956 towed to Antwerp where she was scrapped. [Merchant Fleets, vol.24 by Duncan Haws]

SAN GIL 1920
Official Number 144225. 3,627 gross tons, length 325ft x beam 46.3ft, one funell, two masts, single screw, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 15 passengers. Built by Workman, Clark & Co, Belfast, she was registered in Dec.1920 for Unifruitco S.S.Co, Glasgow (Clark & Service) and sailed under the British flag. 1931 transferred to Balboa Shipping Co (United Fruit Co), Panama flag. 23rd Mar.1937 damaged by fire. 1938 in service in Pacific. 3rd Feb.1942 torpedoed, shelled and sunk by U.103 off New Jersey at position 38.05N 74.40W en route Santa Marta, Colombia to Philadelphia. 39 crew and one passenger saved, 2 crew lost. Captain Koch publicly thanked the U.Boat captain for allowing 25 minutes for the crew to abandon ship before commencing to shell her.[Going Bananas, 100 Years of American Fruit Ships in the Caribbean by Mark Goldberg] [Register of Merchant Ships Completed in 1920 by Wm. A. Schell]

SAN GIORGIO / NAPOLI 1907
6,392 gross tons, length 406ft x beam 51.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 30-1st, 60-2nd and 1,800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 10th Apr.1907 by Sir James Laing & Sons, Sunderland for Sicula Americana, she started her maiden voyage on 19th Jul.1907 when she left Naples for Messina, Palermo and New York. Aug.1917 transferred to ownership of Transoceanica Societa Italiana di Navigazione. 8th Jul.1921 last voyage Naples - New York. Aug.1921 transferred to Navigazione Generale Italiana, renamed NAPOLI. 1926 scrapped. .[North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3,p.1375 by N.R.P. Bonsor]

SAN GIOVANNI / PALERMO 1907
The SAN GIOVANNI was built in 1907 by Sir J.Laing & Sons Ltd, Sunderland for the Italian company Sicula Americana. She was a 6,592 gross ton ship, length 430ft x beam 52.7ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 60-2nd and 1,800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 27/6/1907, she sailed from Naples on her maiden voyage to Messina, Palermo and New York on 14/10/1907. In 1912 she was refitted to carry 1st and 2nd class only and on 4/10/1912 started her first Genoa - Buenos Aires voyage. She made occasional S.America sailings during the autumn and winter months. In August 1917, the company was absorbed into the Transoceanica Societa Italiana di Navigazione. On 11/8/1921, the SAN GIOVANNI started her last Naples - New York crossing and then came under the ownership of Navigazione Generale Italiana, who renamed her PALERMO. She commenced her first voyage from Naples to Palermo and New York on 13/10/1921 and her second and last voyage on this service on 30/11/1921. She was scrapped in 1928. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1375]

SAN GOTTARDO / KABAFUTO MARU 1884
The SAN GOTTARDO was built by G.Ansaldo & Co, Sampierdarena in 1884 for Dufour & Bruzzo, Genoa. She was a 2,532 gross ton ship, length 344.5ft x beam 38.1ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 30-1st and 1,290-3rd class. Launched in May 1884, she started her maiden voyage on 20/5/1884 when she left Genoa for Brazil and Argentina. In 1886 she was chartered by the Italian government for the Abyssinian campaign. In 1889 she was chartered by La Veloce of Genoa and in 1897 chartered by Ligure Brasiliana. She then passed back to her original owners and on 18/4/1903 started her first voyage from Genoa to Naples, Azores and New York. On 5/10/1903 she started her second crossing when she sailed from Genoa for Naples, Palermo and New York, and on 18/4/1904 commenced her third and final voyage on this service. On her last two crossings, only a comparatively small proportion of her available accommodation was taken up and the service was abandoned. Later the same year, the ship was sold to Japanese owners and renamed KABAFUTO MARU and was eventually scrapped in 1933. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1322]

SAN GUGLIELMO 1911
8341 gross tons, length 470ft x beam 56ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots. Accommodation for 50-1st, 175-2nd and 2,200-3rd class passengers. Built by D.& W. Henderson, Glasgow, she was launched for Sicula Americana on 29th Mar.1911 and sailed on her maiden voyage from Naples for New York on 31st Oct.1911. In Aug.1917 the company was absorbed by Transoceanica Soc.Italiana di Navigazione and on 8th Jan.1918 the ship was shelled and sunk by the German submarine U.63 in the Gulf of Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.1375]

SAN MARCOS / SCHIEDAM / MIRAMAR 1874
The SCHIEDAM was built by A.McMillan & Son, Dumbarton, Scotland (engines by J&J Thomson, Glasgow) in 1874 as the SAN MARCOS for the Liverpool & Texas SS Co. She was a 2,236 gross ton ship, length 301ft x beam 39.3ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. In 1877 she was chartered to the Holland America Line, renamed SCHIEDAM, and started her first Rotterdam - New York voyage on 6/10/1877. In 1880 she was purchased by Holland America Line and on 13/5/1882 commenced Amsterdam - New York sailings. She started her last voyage on this service on 9/12/1888, and was then transferred to the South American service. On 25/4/1891 she resumed Rotterdam - New York voyages and on 22/7/1893 resumed Amsterdam - New York voyages. She started her last Amsterdam - New York voyage on 11/6/1897 and was sold to the Italian company, Cosulich the same year. They renamed her MIRAMAR and operated her until 1903 when she was scrapped at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.909]

SANGOLA / GOSHU MARU 1901
The SANGOLA was one of a class of seven mainly cargo ships built for British India Steam Navigation Co. Built by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton in 1901, she was a 5,149 gross ton ship, length 410.8ft x beam 50.7ft x depth 32ft (125,21m x 15,45m x 9,75m). She had one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 10.5 knots. There was accommodation for 6-1st class passengers and she carried a crew of 94. Launched on 18th June 1901, she was delivered to BISNCo on August 16th. In September 1914 she trooped between India and Marseilles and was sold to Japanese owners in June 1923. Renamed GOSHU MARU by Fukuhara Kisen, Dairen she served this company until 1933 when she was scrapped in Japan. [Merchant Fleets, vol.11, British India S.N.Co, by Duncan Haws]

SANNIO / BRITISH PRINCE / NAPOLI 1899
She was a 9,203 gross ton ship, length 470ft x beam 56.8 ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw, and a speed of 13 knots. Accommodation for 70-1st and 2,200-3rd class passengers. Built by Palmers Co Ltd, Jarrow-on-Tyne, she was launched on 21st Oct.1899 as the BRITISH PRINCE for British Shipowners Ltd and sailed for the Phoenix Line between Antwerp and New York as a cargo ship. Sold to the Italian owned Navigazione Generale Italiana in 1906 and renamed SANNIO, she was fitted with passenger accommodation and started her first Genoa - Naples - Palermo - New York voyage on 31st May 1906. Her last sailing on this service started on 1st Apr.1911, and in January 1913 she came under the control of Italia Line and was renamed NAPOLI. She started her first voyage from Genoa to Naples, New York and Philadelphia on 28th Mar.1913, and her first Genoa - Palermo - Naples - Halifax - Boston sailing on 18th Aug.1913. In 1917 she was acquired by Transoceanica of Naples and on 4th Jul.1918 was sunk in collision with the Norwegian ship OTTO SVERDRUP in the Mediterranean with the loss of one life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1117]

SARAH SANDS 1847
1,299 gross tons, length 215ft x beam 33ft, clipper bows, one funnel, four masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 9 knots. She carried approx. 300 passengers. Launched in Sep.1846 by James Hodgson & Co, Liverpool (engines by Bury, Curtis & Kennedy, Liverpool) for Sands & Co. Originally intended for the UK - Australia service, she was instead chartered to the Red Cross Line of sailing packets for an experimental service between Liverpool and New York. Her maiden voyage started from Liverpool on 20th Jan.1847 and she arrived in New York 21 days later. On her third voyage starting on 15th June, she broke some of her valve gearing while 5 days out and returned to Cork under sail for repairs. Eventually sailing on 23rd June and arriving New York after a voyage of 34 days from Liverpool. Her last Liverpool - New York voyage commenced 18th Oct.1849 and from there, she sailed for San Francisco via Cape Horn under charter to Empire City Line and was used on the San Francisco - Panama service. In late 1851 she sailed for Liverpool via Valparaiso and Rio de Janeiro and made two more Liverpool - New York voyages during 1852. On 18th Sep.1852 she sailed Liverpool - Cape Town - Sydney for the Melbourne Gold Mining Association and then returned to Plymouth. On 21st Jul.1853 she started sailings between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal and between Liverpool and Portland for Canadian Steam Nav. Co., making eight round voyages on these routes. Taken over as a Crimea War transport in 1855 and in 1857 was used to convey troops from Portsmouth to Calcutta for the Indian Mutiny. On 11th Nov.1857 she caught fire off Mauritius, the troops were transferred to another ship and she sailed home after temporary repairs. Reconditioned as a sailing ship, she was eventually wrecked on 7th Apr.1869 on the Laccadive Islands, Indian Ocean. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1 by N.R.P. Bonsor]

SARDINIA / SAO JORGE / AMBOIN 1898
The SARDINIA was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1898 as a general trader for the  Hamburg America Line. She was a 3,601 gross ton ship, length 345ft x beam 43.5ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Her sister ship was the SYRIA. This was primarily a cargo vessel but made a single passenger voyage between Hamburg and New York (arr 25/5/1905) with 629-3rd class passengers, and then returned to general trading. In 1916 she was seized by Portugal at Horta, Azores and renamed SAO JORGE and in 1925 was sold to Cia de Nav.Colonial and renamed AMBOIN. She was eventually scrapped at Rotterdam in 1933. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.5,p.1813.] [Merchant Fleets in Profile by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line.]

SARDINIAN 1874
The SARDINIAN was built by R.Steele & Co, Greenock in 1874 for the Allan Line. She was a 4,399 gross ton ship, length 400ft x beam 42.3ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 120-1st and 850-3rd class. Launched on 3rd June 1874, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 29th July 1875. On 10th May 1878 she had an explosion in her bunkers at Moville, Ireland, followed by a fire. She was scuttled to extinguish the fire but subsequently refloated and repaired and resumed sailings between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal on 27th June 1878. In 1897 she was fitted with triple expansion engines by Wm.Denny, Dumbarton and one of her masts removed and on 19th June 1897 commenced her first voyage from Glasgow to Quebec and Montreal. On 16th Dec. 1897 she started her first Glasgow - New York sailing and commenced her last voyage on this route on 20th Dec. 1902. She started sailings between London - Quebec and Montreal, with 2nd and 3rd class passengers only on 20th May 1905 and on 31st July 1912 commenced Glasgow - Liverpool - Philadelphia sailings. Between 27th May 1914 and 7th Dec. 1914 she ran between Glasgow and Boston and in 1917 went to Canadian Pacific Ocean Services together with the rest of the Allan Line fleet. On 20th Sept. 1918 she commenced her first voyage for her new owners when she left London for Quebec and Montreal and on 24th Nov. 1918 made her first voyage after the Armistice, from Glasgow to St John NB with cargo only. She commenced sailings between Avonmouth - Quebec and Montreal on 17th May 1919 and started her last voyage from Avonmouth to St John NB on 21st Dec. 1919. She was sold on 8th Dec. 1920 and became a hulk at Vigo. On 22nd June 1938 she was towed to Bilbao and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.01,p.314]

SARMATIAN 1871
The SARMATIAN was a 3,647 gross ton ship, length 370.9ft x beam 42.2ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 850-3rd class passengers. Built by R. Steele & Co, Greenock (engines by Macnab & Co, Greenock), she was launched for the Allan Line on 7th Mar.1871. Her maiden voyage started on 31st Aug.1871 when she sailed from Liverpool for Quebec and Montreal and 1874 she was chartered for use as a troopship for the Ashanti Expedition. Her last voyage from Liverpool started on 3rd Jan.1889 when she sailed for Halifax and Portland and on 21st Jun.1889 she commenced her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailing. Fitted with triple expansion engines in 1890, she resumed Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 25th Apr.1890. In 1900 her accommodation was re-classified as 2nd and 3rd class only and on 3rd Jun.1903 she commenced her first Glasgow - Boston voyage. Her first London - Quebec - Montreal sailing started on 22nd Apr.1905 and her final sailing started on 20th Jul.1907 when she left Boston for Glasgow. In 1908 she was scrapped at Rotterdam.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.313-4]

SARNIA 1872
The SARNIA was a 3,728 gross ton ship, length 360.7ft x beam 40.3 ft, one funnel, four masts, iron hull, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation for 80-cabin, 60- internediate and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Built by C. Connell & Co, Glasgow, she was launched for the Dominion Line on 30th Jun.1882 and started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal on 7th Sep.1882. In Aug.1893 she broke her propeller shaft and was towed 1,000 miles to Queenstown by the Allan Liner MONTE VIDEAN. Her masts were reduced to two and in Dec.1894 she broke her rudder and was towed to Inishtrahull by the Allan Liner NORWEGIAN and thence to Belfast by tugs. Sold to the Furness Line in 1896, she was chartered to Hamburg America Line and on 20th Jun.1896 started the first of two Hamburg - Montreal voyages. On 24th Nov.1896 she commenced her first voyage for Furness Line when she left Genoa for New York and started her fourth and last sailing on 28th Jul.1897 from New York to Naples, Genoa and Leghorn. She was then scrapped at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.806]

SATURNIA 1910
This was a 8,611 gross ton ship, length 456.3ft x beam 55.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 250-2nd and 950-3rd class passengers. Built by C.Connell & Co, Glasgow for the Donaldson Line Ltd, she was launched on 29th Mar.1910.  Her maiden voyage started on 11th Jun.1910 when she left Glasgow for Quebec and Montreal and in Aug.1911 she collided with an iceberg near Belle Isle but managed to complete her homeward voyage. Her last voyage started on 12th Mar.1925 when she sailed from Glasgow for Portland and she was sold in Dec.1928 and scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1013]

SATURNIA / FRANCES Y. SLANGER 1925
The SATURNIA was a 23,940 gross ton ship, length 630ft x beam 80ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. Accommodation for 305-1st, 460-2nd, 310-intermediate and 700-3rd class passengers. Built by Cantiere Navale Triestino, Monfalcone, she was launched for the Cosulich Line on 29th Dec.1925 and started her maiden voyage from Trieste for Naples, Marseilles and South America on 21st Sep.1927. On 1st Feb.1928 she started Mediterranean - New York sailings and in 1937 was transferred to the ownership of Italia Line. Interned in New York in May 1940, she was seized by the USA in Dec.1941, and in 1945 became the US Hospital Ship FRANCES Y.SLANGER.  Returned to Italy in Nov.1946, she reverted to SATURNIA, was rebuilt to carry 240-1st, 270-2nd and 860-tourist class passengers and commenced Genoa - Naples - New York sailings on 20th Jan.1947. Her last voyage on this service started on 3rd Oct.1955 and she then transferred to Mediterranean - US/Canada sailings. On 7th Mar.1965 she commenced her final voyage from Trieste to Venice, Patras, Naples, Palermo, Gibraltar, Lisbon, Halifax, New York, Boston, Lisbon, Gibraltar, Naples, Palermo, Patras, Venice and Trieste. She was scrapped at Spezia the same year.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1619]

SAVANNAH 1818
The first steamship to cross the Atlantic was the US owned vessel SAVANNAH in 1819. She was a 320 ton ship, length 98.5ft x beam 25.8ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), wooden hull, side paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 4 knots. Built by Samuel Fickett and William Crockett, New York (engines by Daniel Dod, Stephen Vail and James P. Allaire, New York), she was laid down as a sailing packet, but was completed as a steamship and launched on 22nd Aug.1818. She started her maiden voyage on 22nd May 1819 when she left Savannah for Liverpool (arrived 20th June) and later proceeded to Helsingor (Elsinore), Stockholm and St Petersburgh. She then proceeded under sail alone to Copenhagen, Arendal and Savannah (arrived 30th Nov.). Subsequently sold in Washington, her engines were removed and she was employed as a sailing packet between New York and Savannah. On 5th Nov.1821 she was wrecked at Fire Place, Long Island, NY.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.44]

SAXON 1887 O.N.94503
462 gross tons, iron hulled passenger / cargo steamer, 145.7ft x 24.7ft , accommodation for 17-1st and 30-2nd class passengers. Built 1887 by Oswald Mordaunt & Co., Southampton for Union SS Co., Southampton. South African coastal services and used mostly on the Capetown - Knysna run. Jan.1896 sold to Empresa Africana Navegacao, Lourenco Marques. 28th Jan.1896 wrecked on a reef off Kosi Bay near the Mozambique border on her delivery voyage Durban to Delagoa Bay with general cargo. All her passengers were transferred to lifeboats and landed at Delagoa Bay. The wreck is still popular among divers.

SAXON 1899
The SAXON was a 12,385 gross ton ship, length 570.5ft x beam 64.4ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17.5 knots. There was accommodation for 310-1st, 203-2nd, 132-3rd and 154-steerage class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the Union Line, she was launched on 2st Dec.1899, a few weeks before the merger between the Union and Castle Lines to form the Union-Castle Mail Steamship Co. After running her trials, she proceeded to Holyhead where she picked up a large number of guests for her sailing to Southampton. She left Southampton in June 1900 on her maiden voyage, so heavily booked that extra 3rd class accommodation had to be temporarily installed. On July 3rd she reached Cape Town. She then ran regularly on the mail service between Southampton, Cape Town and Durban with a call at Madeira. In 1902 she carried the three Boer War generals, Botha, de la Rey and de Witt to Southampton. On the outbreak of the Great War, she continued service to South Africa, changing her departure port to London on the closure of Southampton to commercial shipping. Requisitioned in Jan.1917 for use as a transport in the Mediterranean, she spent most of that year operating between Marseilles and Alexandria. Later she made a voyage to East Africa and then transferred to the Atlantic bringing US troops to Europe. After the Armistice, she made a voyage to Australia, probably with returning troops and was then handed back to her owners. In August 1921, she had a serious fire after leaving Madeira, so serious that distress signals were made and the cargo liner WAIPARA stood by and escorted her to Freetown where the KENILWORTH CASTLE was diverted to pick up her passengers and mails. Withdrawn from service in 1931 after the introduction of more modern ships by the company, she was laid up for four years until sold for scrap in 1935.[Steamers of the Past by J.H.Isherwood, Sea Breezes Magazine, Oct.1959]

SAXONIA / NIJNI NOVGOROD 1857
The SAXONIA was built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1857 and was the first of three ships of this name owned by the Hamburg America Line. She was a 2,684 gross ton vessel, length 311.7ft x beam 42.6ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. She was one of six sister ships, the others being HAMMONIA, BORUSSIA, AUSTRIA, BAVARIA and TEUTONIA. There was accommodation for 60-1st, 120-2nd and 450-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21/8/1857, she was immediately chartered to the British government to carry troops to the Indian Mutiny. On 1/4/1858 she sailed from Hamburg on her first voyage to Southampton and New York and in 1871 was fitted with compound engines by Reiherstieg, Hamburg. She commenced her last voyage from Hamburg to New York on 5/10/1873 and subsequently sailed on the Hamburg - West Indies service. In 1879 she was sold to the Russian Volunteer Fleet and renamed NIJNI NOVGOROD and was eventually scrapped in 1895.

SAXONIA 1899
The SAXONIA was a 14,281 gross ton ship, length 580ft x beam 64.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 164-1st, 200-2nd and 1,600-3rd class passengers. Built by John Brown & Co, Glasgow, she was launched for the Cunard Steamship Co. on 16th Dec.1899. She left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and Boston on 22nd May 1900 and started her last voyage on this service on 16th Nov.1909. On 23rd Dec.1909 she commenced the first of two sailings between Trieste, Fiume, Naples and New York and on 10th May 1910 resumed Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston sailings. She resumed the Trieste - New York route on 11th Nov.1910 and on 30th Sep.1911 started her first Liverpool - Queenstown - New York voyage. On 20th Mar.1910 she again resumed the Trieste - New York run and started her last voyage from Trieste to Fiume, Patras, Messina, Naples, Lisbon and New York on 8th Jul.1914. She sailed from Liverpool on 29th Aug.1914 for New York and then proceeded to Quebec to become a Canadian Government Transport. Between 1914-15 she became a prisoner of war ship at London and resumed commercial services on 1st Mar.1917 when she left London on the first of three voyages to New York. She resumed Liverpool - New York sailings in Sep.1917 and on 14th Dec.1918 commenced her first voyage after the Armistice when she left London for New York. Refitted in 1920 to carry 471-cabin and 978-3rd class passengers and with her funnel shortened by 15ft. On 18th Oct.1924 she commenced her final voyage when she sailed from London for Hamburg, Southampton, Cherbourg and New York. In March 1925 she was scrapped at Hendrik Ido Ambacht, Holland. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.155]

SCANDIA / WARREN 1889
The SCANDIA was a 4,243 gross ton ship, built for the Hamburg America Line in 1889 by A.G.Vulcan, Stettin. Her details were - length 370.7ft x beam 44.3ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was capacity for 30-1st and 1,400-3rd class passengers. Laid down as the SCANDINAVIA, she was launched on 24th Aug.1889 as the SCANDIA and sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to New York and Philadelphia on 5th Nov.1889. Her last Hamburg - New York voyage started on 27th Sep.1896, and in 1898 she became the US Army transport WARREN. She was destroyed by fire in dock in 1924 and was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P. Bonsor, vol.1, p.396]

SCANDINAVIAN 1869
This ship was built by R.Steele & Co, Greenock in 1869 for the Allan Line. She was a 2,840 gross ton ship, length 338.7ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 8th Nov. 1869, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal on 5th May 1870. On 16th March 1876 she commenced her last voyage from Liverpool to Portland and was then laid up until 1879 when she was fitted with compound engines. On 26th Aug. 1879 she sailed from Liverpool to St.John's, NF, Halifax and Baltimore and on 28th April 1880 started sailings between Glasgow, Quebec and Montreal. On 19th Nov. 1885 she commenced running between Glasgow and Philadelphia and on 14th Feb. 1899 commenced her last voyage Glasgow - Boston. Later the same year she was scrapped in Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.313]

SCANDINAVIAN / NEW ENGLAND / ROMANIC 1898
11,394 gross tons, length 550.3ft x beam 59.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, eight cylinder triple expansion engines, coal burning and a speed of 15 knots. Accommodation for 200-1st, 200-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched on 7th Apr.1898 as the NEW ENGLAND for the Dominion Line and started her maiden voyage between Liverpool and Boston on 30th Jun.1898. In 1903 she was sold to the White Star Line, renamed ROMANIC and sailed mostly between Naples, Genoa and Boston. Sold to the Allan Line in Jan.1912, renamed SCANDINAVIAN and refitted to carry 400-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers, she was used on the Glasgow - Canada service. On 22nd Aug.1914 she started her usual voyage to Quebec and Montreal but on her eastbound voyage she was used to transport part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force to the UK before resuming normal services. In 1917 she came under Canadian Pacific ownership after their takeover of Allan Line. Used on Liverpool - Canada/USA routes until 1922 when she was laid up and scrapped in Germany the following year.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.762]

SCHARNHORST / LA BOURDONNAIS 1904
8131 gross tons, 453.5ft x beam 55.8ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 114-1st, 115-2nd and 1,800-3rd class passengers. Built 1904 by Tecklenborg, Geestemunde for North German Lloyd. Designed for Far Eastern / Australian routes. Maiden voyage started 31st Aug.1904 from Bremen to Southampton, Suez, Freemantle, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney. 25th May 1905 first voyage Hamburg - Suez - Far East (3 round voyages), 5th Dec.1908 first sailing Bremen - New York, 21st Feb.1914 fifth and last New York voyage, 8th Apr.1914 19th and last sailing Bremen - Southampton - Sydney. Between 1914-1915 she was briefly a hospital ship, 1917 a naval transport and in 1918 served in the Finland expedition. On 6th Feb.1919 she was seized by France at Cherbourg while employed in prisoner exchange service and was managed by Messageries Maritimes. In 1921 she was transferred to Compagnie Generale Transatlantique and renamed LA BOURDONNAIS. Fitted with accommodation for 122-cabin and 500-3rd class passengers. 2nd Apr.1921 first voyage Havre - New York, 20th Jan.1923 last voyage Havre - New York, 3rd Mar.1923 first Bordeaux - NY sailing, 31st Jan.1931 final sailing Bordeaux - Vigo - Halifax - NY. 1934 scrapped Genoa. [North Star to Southern Cross by John Maber] [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2 by N. Bonsor]

SCHIEDAM / SAN MARCOS / MIRAMAR 1874
The SCHIEDAM was built in 1874 by A.McMillan & Son, Dumbarton (engines by J&J.Thomson, Glasgow) as the SAN MARCOS for the Liverpool and Texas Steamship Co. She was a 2,236 gross ton ship, length 301ft x beam 39.3ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 1st Sep.1874, she was chartered to the Holland America Line, renamed SCHIEDAM and started Rotterdam - New York sailings on 6th Oct.1877. In 1880, Holland America Line purchased the ship outright, and commenced Amsterdam - New York voyages on 13th May 1882. On 9th Dec.1888 she transferred to the South America service and on 25th Apr.1891 resumed Rotterdam - New York sailings. She resumed Amsterdam - New York voyages on 22nd Jul.1893 and started her last voyage on this service on 11th Jun.1897. Sold to Cosulich in 1897 and renamed MIRAMAR, she was eventually scrapped in 1903. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.909]

SCHILLER 1873
The SCHILLER was built by R.Napier & Sons, Glasgow in 1873 for the German Transatlantic Steamship Co (Adler Line) of Hamburg. She was a 3,421 gross ton ship, length 380.5ft x beam 40.1ft, straight stem, two funnels, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 90-1st, 100-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 26/8/1873, she left Hamburg on her maiden voyage to New York on 5/2/1874. On 27/4/1875 she sailed from New York on her eighth eastbound voyage to Plymouth, Cherbourg and Hamburg, but on May 7th she ran aground on Retarrier Reef, Scilly Isles in dense fog and a heavy swell. She had aboard 59-1st, 75-2nd and 120-3rd class passengers, as well as her crew of 101. The heavy seas broke her up with the loss of 312 of the 355 aboard. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.952][Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America, Adler & Carr Lines]

SCHOMBERG 1875
The SCHOMBERG was built by Alexander Hall of Aberdeen in 1875. She was a 2284 tons register ship, overall length 288ft x beam 45ft. Captain Forbes, as commodore of the Black Ball Line was shifted into her from the LIGHTNING, and it was hoped that she would break the record to Australia. She sailed from Liverpool on 6th October 1855 and Forbes boasted that he would reach Australia in 60 days. However she encountered light and moderate winds and her best day's run was 368 miles. She sighted Cape Bridgewater on Christmas day and on 27th December, after two days tacking, and the wind blowing fresh from ahead, she went about at noon when 4 miles offshore and tacked out. At 6 pm he tacked in again and at about 10.30 pm, the land being faintly visible, the wind died away. Forbes was playing cards in the saloon when the mate reported that the ship was drifting close to the land and suggested going about. Forbes was losing at cards and being in a bad temper, insisted on playing another hand before tacking ship, and the danger point had been passed when he came on deck at 11.30 and gave the order to about ship. As there was hardly any wind, the ship refused to come about and the ship grounded on a sandbank 35 miles West of Cape Otway. When Forbes was told that she was hard aground he is reported to have said "Let her go to hell" and immediately went below. Henry Keen, the mate then took charge, clewed up the sails, dropped the anchor and lowered the boats. It was mainly due to the Mate and a first class passenger, that all passengers were safely disembarked and put aboard the steamer "Queen" the following morning. All efforts to save the ship failed and she eventually broke up. Forbes was aquitted of blame at the enquiry as the sandbank was uncharted, but at a mass meeting of the passengers he was severely censured and some went so far as to suggest that he was so disgusted at the slowness of the passage that he let the ship go ashore on purpose. He never obtained command of another Black Ball ship and sank into obscurity; staying in Australia for a while. He obtained command of the HASTINGS in 1857 but lost her in 1859 and for a while was 'on the beach' in Calcutta. He reappeared in Scotland in 1862 acting as agent for the owners of the EARL OF DERBY and in 1864 was in Hong Kong in command of the GENERAL WYNDHAM. He was described then as 'a seedy broken-down looking skipper'. He commanded this ship until 1866 and that was the end of his sea going career. He died at the early age of 52 on 4th June 1874 in Liverpool and his tombstone is in Smithdown Road Cemetary. [The Colonial Clippers by Basil Lubbock]

SCINDIA 1890
4,358 gross tons, length 375ft x beam 46.2ft, one funnel, two masts, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 20-1st and 1,125-3rd class passengers. Built 1890 by D & W. Henderson for the Anchor Line's Indian service. Aug.1890 maiden voyage Glasgow - Liverpool - Calcutta. 9th Apr.1896 first voyage Venice - Trieste - Catania - New York. 24th Mar.1898 last voyage Marseille - Genoa - Naples - New York. 12th May 1898 sold to U.S. Government. 1901 renamed AJAX, 1926 renamed AC.14. 1925 renamed CONSUELO, 1930 sold to China renamed HUA TONG, 1933 scrapped.

SCOT / OCEANA / ALFONSO XIII / VASCO NUNEZ DE BALBOA 1890
Built by William Denny & Bros, Dumbarton in 1890, she was a 6,844 gross ton ship when launched with a length of 477ft. She had a clipper stem, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 208-1st, 100-2nd and 100-3rd class. Launched on 30th dec.1890 as the SCOT for the Union Line's UK to South Africa service, she commenced her maiden voyage on 25th Jul.1891 when she left Southampton for Madeira and Cape Town. She made the run in the record time of 15 days 9 hours 52 mins, but was found to be extremely heavy on coal consumption. In March 1893 she lowered the record to 14 days 18 hours 57 mins, and held this speed record until 1936 when it was broken by the STIRLING CASTLE. In 1896 she was rebuilt to 7,859 gross tons with a length of  531ft and with passenger accommodation for 400-1st and 25-2nd class. In 1899 she was used as a troopship in the Boer War, and in 1905 was sold to Hamburg America Line, renamed OCEANA, and was initally used for cruising between Naples and Alexandria. On 8th June 1906 she commenced her first Hamburg - New York voyage, and between then and 1910 made 7.5 round voyages on this servive, the last one starting on 25th Dec.1910. In 1911 she was sold to the Bermuda North Atlantic Co and operated between New York and Bermuda, and in 1916 was purchased by the Spanish owned Cia Trasatlantica, renamed ALFONSO XIII and was used on the Spain - New York and Spain - Cuba services. Her last sailing commenced 22nd Nov.1921 when she left Bilbao for Santander, Vigo, Havana and New York. In 1923 she was renamed VASCO NUNEZ DE BALBOA and was later laid up at Cadiz and scrapped in Italy in 1927. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.412][Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line] [Union-Castle Line by Peter Newall]

SCOTIA 1857
1,168 gross tons, length 241ft x beam 30.2ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), clipper bows, iron hull, single screw, speed 11 knots. Accommodation for 24-1st class passengers plus troops.
Built 1857 by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock for Robert Steele & Partners she made her maiden voyage on 4th Sep.1857 with troops to Bombay. In 1859 she was sold to the Greek & Oriental S.N. Co., Glasgow. 1863 sold to Fleming & Gambler, London. 1865 owned by Carr & Co., London. 1868 Sank in the River Clyde, salvaged and sold to Peter Denny and James Galbraith. Repaired and rebuilt by Wm. Denny & Bros and sold to British India Steam Navigation Co. 1876 sold. 17th Jun.1876 sailed from Calcutta on her delivery voyage to new owners at Penang and never heard of again.

SCOTIA 1861
This was a 3871 gross ton ship, length 379.4ft x beam 47.8ft, clipper bows, two funnels, two masts (rigged for sail), side paddle wheel propulsion, iron hull and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 275-cabin and 300-2nd class passengers. Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow, she was launched for the Cunard SS Co on 25th Jun.1861 and started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York on 19th May 1862. During her career she held the eastbound Blue Riband for five years with a record passage Liverpool - New York in 8days 3hours, with an average speed of 14 knots. Her last passage was in 1874 and she was laid up in Liverpool the following year. Sold to Telegraph Construction & Maintenance Co. in 1878, she was rebuilt as a twin screw cable layer and laid cables between Lizard - Bilbao, Portcurno - Gibraltar and Aden - Bombay, etc. In 1903 she was sold to Commercial Cable Co. and used as a repair ship in the Pacific, based at Guam. On 11th Mar.1904 she grounded off Guam and broke her back, becoming a total loss. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.12]

SCOTIA / PRINCIPESSA MAFALDA / EPOMEO 1880
which belonged to the Glasgow and South Western Railway Co which was a paddle steamer. She was a 303 gross ton ship, length 211ft x beam 21.8ft, two funnels, one mast, side paddle wheels. Built 1880 by Wm.King & Co, Glasgow for Capt. William Buchanan who used her on the Glasgow - Rothesay - Arran route. In 1885 she transferred to Ardrossan - Arran sailings and in 1891 was taken over by the railway company. 1893 sold to Edwards, Robertson & Co, Cardiff and used for South Wales excursions. 1899 owned by P & A Campbell, Bristol. 1903 sold to Italy, renamed PRINCIPESSA MAFALDA and used to carry workers from Naples to their works at Castellamare. 1906 sold and renamed EPOMEO. 1911 used as a cargo ship. 1915 mined and sunk in the Gulf of Taranto while acting as an Italian Navy minesweeper. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.26]

SCOTIA 1889
The SCOTIA was a 2,763 gross ton ship, length 310ft x beam 40.7ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 11 knots. Built by D & W. Henderson Ltd, Glasgow, she was launched on 16th May 1889 for Anchor Line's services to India. She started her maiden voyage in Nov.1889 from Glasgow to Liverpool and Calcutta and in 1890 sailed from Glasgow for Denia, Valencia and New York. Between 1890-91 she made three Mediterranean - New York voyages and in 1892 made three Glasgow - Liverpool - Calcutta sailings. She returned to the Mediterranean - New York route in 1893 and made 13 voyages, the last starting 19th Dec.1897 when she left Marseilles for New York. (the maximum number of passengers noted on these voyages was 3-1st and 393-3rd class). In April 1903 she was sold to the Kingsley Steamship Co and in 1906 went missing at sea.[North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.464 by N.R.P.Bonsor] [Merchant Fleets, vol.9 by Duncan Haws]

SCOTIA / GRIMM / NORDSEE / DENISE 1890
Built by C. Connell & Co, Glasgow (engines by J.& J. Thomson, Glasgow)in 1890 as the GRIMM for the Hansa Line. Her dimensions were - 2,558 gross tons, length 320ft x beam 40.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 10-1st and 550-3rd class passengers. Launched on 20th May 1890, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Montreal on 19th Jul.1890. Her last voyage on this service started on 8th Oct.1891 and in March 1892 she was purchased by the Hamburg America Line. She commenced Hamburg - Montreal sailings for her new owners on 20th May 1892 and in 1895 was renamed SCOTIA. Her first sailing under this name started 27th Apr.1895 when she left Hamburg for Montreal and on 20th Nov.1895 she commenced her first Hamburg - Baltimore voyage. On 10th Nov.1898 she was chartered to the Red Star Line and started the first of two Antwerp - New York voyages and commenced Genoa - Naples - New York sailings for Hamburg America Line on 3rd Apr.1901. Her tenth and last voyage on this route started on 19th Oct.1902 and 1910 she was sold to Emil R. Retzlaff, Stettin. Surrendered to Britain in 1919, she was sold to W. Schuchman in 1922 and renamed NORDSEE. In 1924 she was purchased by Belgian owners and renamed DENISE and was scrapped in Italy in 1926. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.399][Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

SCOTIAN 1910 see STATENDAM 1898

SCOTIAN / PRESIDENT LINCOLN 1903
This was a 18,084 gross ton ship, built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1903. Her details were - length 598.8ft x beam 68.2ft, one funnel, six masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 202-1st, 153-2nd, 788-3rd and 2,300-4th class passengers. Launched on 8/10/1903 as the SCOTIAN for Wilson's & Furness-Leyland Line, the order was cancelled and she was uncompleted for many months until purchased by Hamburg America Line of Hamburg in 1906 and renamed PRESIDENT LINCOLN. She commenced her maiden voyage on 1/6/1907 when she sailed from Hamburg for Boulogne, Plymouth and New York. On 25/7/1914 she started her last Hamburg - Southampton - New York crossing (arr.5/8/1914) and was interned at Hoboken, New York until 1917, when she was seized by US authorities. She was then used as a troopship until, having delivered 3,000 troops to Cherbourg, she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.90, on the return crossing to New York; on 31/5/1918 with the loss of 26 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.413] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

SCOTLAND 1872  
British Colonial Steamship Co - became Temperley Line in 1872. Sailed London - Plymouth - Canada from May 1872 until 1876 when calls at Plymouth were dropped. Subsequently London - Canada direct until ship sold to F. Ross, Quebec in 1889. Scrapped 1893. London brokers were Temperley, Carter & Darke. I can find no mention of Wilcocks & Weekes and think they were probably the Plymouth agents.

SCOTSMAN 1895
6041 gross tons, length 470.7ft x beam 49.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 100-1st, 130-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfastm she was launched for the Dominion Line on 13th Dec.1894 and started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Halifax and Portland on 28th Nov.1895. On 14th May 1896 she commenced her first Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyage and on 22nd Sep.1899 was wrecked in the Belle Isle Straits with the loss of 13 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.808]

SCYTHIA 1874
The SCYTHIA was a 4,557 gross ton ship, built by J.& G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1874 for the British & North American Royal Mail Steam Packet Co (Cunard Line). Her details were - length 420.8ft x beam 42.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 300-1st and 1,100-3rd class passengers. Launched on 28th Oct.1874, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 1st May 1875. On 9th July 1884 she commenced her first Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston sailing and subsequent sailings were mostly on this route. Her last voyage started on 20th Sep.1898 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown and New York and she was scrapped in Italy the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.152]

SCYTHIA 1921
The SCYTHIA was a 19,730 gross ton ship, overall length 624ft x beam 73.8ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 350-1st, 350-2nd and 1,500-3rd class passengers. Built by Vickers Ltd, Barrow for Cunard-White Star Line, she was launched on 23rd Mar.1920. On 20th Aug.1921 she left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown and New York and continued this service until commencing her last voyage on 5th Aug.1939 between Liverpool - Boston - New York - Liverpool. Converted to a troopship in Aug.1939 and used on trooping duties until 1948 when she resumed commercial voyages. In Oct.1948 she sailed from Cuxhaven for Havre and Quebec and made 10 voyages to Quebec or Halifax. Refitted in Nov.1949 to carry 248-1st and 630-tourist class passengers, she sailed from Liverpool on 17th Aug.1950 for Quebec and London. On 14th Sep.1950 she started London - Quebec sailings and on 10th Apr.1951 transferred to Southampton - Havre - Quebec voyages. Her last Liverpool - Cobh - New York voyage commenced 5th Oct.1957 and on 24th Oct.1957 she started her first Quebec - Rotterdam sailing for the Canadian Government. Her final crossing commenced 11th Dec.1957 when she left Halifax for Havre, Rotterdam and Southampton and she was scrapped at Inverkeithing the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.163]

SEA KING / OTARAMA / HIGHLAND GHILLIE / CONSTANTIN / RIVER TYNE / SPA 1890
Built by Wm Doxford & Sons, Sunderland in 1890. 3,935 gross tons, length 365.1ft x beam 47.1ft (111,28m x 14,35m), one funnel, two masts, single screw, 10 knots. Built as the SEA KING for Wm Ross & Co, she was acquired by J.B.Westray who installed the refigerating machinery and insulated cargo space. Later the same year she was purchased by New Zealand Shipping Co and renamed OTARAMA. In 1902 she was bought by Nelson Line and renamed HIGHLAND GHILLIE and employed on the River Plate service. Sold to Michael Jebson of Hamburg in 1912, renamed CONSTANTIN, the outbreak of the Great War in 1914 found her in Varna and she was sold to M.Gumuchdjian of Varna, Bulgaria. Renamed RIVER TYNE in 1924 and transferred to British registration, again renamed SPA in 1925 and transferred to the Belgian flag and registered in Antwerp. Scrapped at Rotterdam in 1933.

SEANG CHOON / CHESHIRE 1891
5,708 g.t., 445.5ft x 49.1ft, twin screw passenger ship, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 100-1st class passengers. Built 1891 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast as the CHESHIRE for Bibby Line, Liverpool. 1900 Boer War troopship. 1910 sold to Lim Chin Tsong, Rangoon renamed SEANG CHOON. 1915 became British army troopship and took part in the Dardanelles campaign the India - UK service. Mar.1917 taken over under the Liner Requisition Scheme. 10th Jul.1917 torpedoed and sunk by U.87 off Fastnet on voyage Sydney to London. Nineteen lives lost. [Merchant Fleets, vol.29 by Duncan Haws]

SEBASTIAN CERMENO 1943
She was a 7,194 ton Liberty ship, built 1943 at Richmond, Cal. and operated by Oliver J. Olson & Co., San Francisco. At 0742 GCT on 27th Jun.1943 she was torpedoed by the German submarine U.511 (Capt. Schneewind) in the Indian Ocean in position 29.00S 50.10E on voyage Mombasa, Kenya to Bahia, Brazil. At 0742 two torpedoes struck the ship on the port side, the first in No.5 hold and the second in No.4 hold. The bulkheads of the Armed Guard quarters were blown in, the after gun deck buckled, main deck ripped on the port side and the hatch covers blown off. The propeller shaft was destroyed, radio smashed and all power cut off and the ship abandoned in 5 lifeboats. She sank at 0752 hours Distress calls were later made from the lifeboat radios. The survivors were rescued by various vessels between July 13th and 23rd and landed at Durban and Madagascar. Five lives were lost.

SEDGWICK / CITY OF CHESTER / CHESTER / ARIZONA / NAPOLETANO 1873
The CITY OF CHESTER was a 4,566 gross ton ship, built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1873 for the Inman Line of Liverpool. Her details were - length 444.6ft x beam 44.2ft, clipper stem, two funnels, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw, two cylinder compound engine, and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 125-1st, 80-2nd and 1,310-3rd class passengers. Launched on 29th Mar.1873, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 10th Jul.1873. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 15th Feb.1893 and then went to the American Line, but stayed under the British flag, and was renamed CHESTER. On 4th Mar.1893 she started her first New York - Southampton crossing and on 4th Nov.1894 commenced her last Southampton - New York voyage. She resumed the Southampton -Queenstown - New York service on 14th May 1898 and started her third and final voyage on this route on 9th Jul.1898. She then became the US Army Transport SEDGWICK. In 1903 she was sold to Italian owners who renamed her ARIZONA and in 1906 she became the Italian NAPOLETANO. She was scrapped in 1907. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.243]

SENEGAL 1880
The SENEGAL belonged to British & African S.N.Co (Elder Dempster & Co) and was not lost. On 23rd Apr.1880 she rescued the passengers and crew of the Union Steamship Co's AMERICAN which sank off Las Palmas, Canary Islands after losing her propeller shaft. In Dec.of that year she grounded off Las Palmas but was refloated and returned to the UK where she was lengthened during repairs. On 2nd Jun.1887 she was wrecked near Tabou Point, Spanish Guinea, en route Grand Bareley - Liverpool. Details of the AMERICAN are that at 05.00 on 23rd April, while en route from the UK to Table Bay, the propeller shaft fractured and the rotating screw pulled it out of the ship which commenced to flood. Despite closing water tight doors, the ship sank at position 01.52N 09.50W. All aboard were saved. Information from Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vols 18 & 20.

SERVIA 1881
7,392 gross tons, length 515ft x beam 52.1ft, two funnels, three masts (rigged for sail), single screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation for 480-1st and 750-3rd class passengers. Built by J & G. Thomson, Glasgow, she was launched for Cunard SS Co on 1st Mar.1881. Her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York started on 26th Nov.1881  and in 1889 she was refitted to carry 400-1st, 200-2nd and 500-3rd class passengers. In Nov.1899 she became a transport for the Boer War and resumed Liverpool - Queenstown - New York voyages on 9th Jun.1900. Her last voyage on this service started on 17th Sep.1901 and she was scrapped the following year at Preston. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.152/3]

SEVEN SEAS / MORMACMAIL / LONG ISLAND / NELLY 1940
The SEVEN SEAS was built by Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co, Chester, Pa. in 1940 as the MORMACMAIL for the US Moore McCormack Line as a freighter. She was a 12,575 gross ton ship, length overall 492ft x beam 69.2ft, one funnel, one mast, single screw and a speed of 16 knots. Launched on 15/1/1940, she went to the US Navy in 1941 and was renamed LONG ISLAND. In April 1947 she was laid up and in 1948 was sold to the Caribbean Land & Shipping Co, renamed NELLY and rebuilt as a passenger ship with accommodation for 20-1st class and 1,066-tourist class. In 1949 she made her first Bremen - Australia voyage and in 1953 was renamed SEVEN SEAS. In 1955 she was chartered to the German Europe-Canada Line  and on 30/4/1955 commenced her first Bremen - Havre - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal voyage. In Jan 1956 she made her first Bremen - Rotterdam - Havre - Southampton - Halifax - New York voyage (winter service) and in April 1956 resumed Bremen - Quebec - Montreal voyages. She was bought outright by Europe-Canada Line in 1956 and in April 1963 made her last Bremen - Rotterdam - Havre - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal voyage and subsequently ran to New York. On 17/7/1965 she had a serious fire in the engine room while 500 miles from St John's NF to which port she was towed. She was repaired and on 20/6/1966 resumed the New York - Southampton - Havre - Rotterdam - Bremen service, starting her last voyage on 13/9/1966. She was bought by Rotterdam University the same year and employed as a students' hostel until 1977 when she was scrapped in Belgium. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1738]

SEVERN 1870
Built by J.Laing, Sunderland (engines by G.Clark, Sunderland). 1,271 gross tons, length 245.2ft x beam 30.1ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 24th Nov.1870 for E.T.Gourley, Sunderland, she was chartered to the Temperley Line and started her first London - Quebec - Montreal sailing on 3rd Jun.1871. Purchased outright by the Temperley Line in 1873, and continued until starting her last London - Quebec - Montreal sailing in Sep.1881. Sold to other British owners in 1883, she was sunk in collision with the SS INDUS in Havre Roads on 26th Mar.1885.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.672]

SEYDLITZ 1902
The SEYDLITZ was built by F.Schichau, Danzig in 1903 for North German Lloyd of Bremen. She was a 7,942 gross ton ship, length 450.1ft x beam 55.5ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 101-1st, 105-2nd and 1,700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 25/10/1902, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to the Far East via Suez on 5/8/1903. She made six round voyages on this service and on 22/2/1905 started her first Bremen - Suez - Australia voyage, and made 18 round voyages on this route. Her first Bremen - New York crossing commenced on 31/3/1906 and on 15/3/1913 she started a single round voyage between Bremen and South America. On 3/10/1913 she commenced a single Bremen - Philadelphia voyage. She commenced her eighth and last N.Atlantic sailing on 25/4/1914 when she left Bremen for New York and on 3/6/1914 started her last Bremen - Australia sailing. She left Sydney on 3/8/1914 and took refuge at Bahia Blanca, Argentina for the duration of the Great War. After the Armistice, she was retained by NGL, refitted to carry cabin and 3rd class passengers and on 12/11/1921 resumed Bremen - S.America sailings. On 11/2/1922 she resumed Bremen - New York voyages and in May 1928 was altered to carry cabin, tourist third cabin, and 3rd class passengers. In March 1930 she made her last Bremen - Halifax - New York - Bremen voyage and on 27/6/1931 commenced her last crossing from Galveston to Bremen. She was scrapped at Bremerhaven in 1933. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.567]

SHALIMAR 1855
The ship Shalimar was built at St. John, New Brunswick in 1854, by James Nevins : length 208 ft. (overall 225 ft.) ; breadth 40 ft. ; depth 23 ft. ; carpenter's measurement 1,467 tons ; register 1,402 tons. She was sold to Liverpool in 1854 for the Australia line of packets, the "White Star Line" of John Pilkington and Henry Threlfall Wilson. She began her Australia service in 1855.
. . . She is a handsome looking vessel—always a recommendation—neatly rigged, her bow ornamented with a well executed female figure, and her stern enriched with a tasteful design in giltwork. Her arrangements on deck comprise a topgallant forecastle for the crew, a large, well-built house amidships, and a full poop aft with a commodious erection built on that, which includes the chief cabin entrance, and a very comfortable smoking room, with stained glass windows. She has plenty of deck-room for passengers to promenade, and her high bulwarks will shelter them in heavy weather. The appearance of the deck arrangements is very compact and tasteful for the houses are finished in an ornamental style, and painted blue and white. The chief cabin in an elegant apartment upholstered in dark polished woods, mahogany, rosewood and walnut, with a rich head-work of satinwood marking the panels. In the cornice-decorations the "white star" is conspicuous on a red ground. There are berths for a dozen passengers, with baths and every other sanitary comfort attached. Although the first impression which strikes us is its limited size, a more close examination shows that a much more than usual space is bestowed upon the state-rooms and berths.
The forward part of the poop is fitted to accomodate thirty second-cabin passengers, and twenty of the same class are located in the house amidships. In these apartments the improved plan is adopted of making the meal-rooms apart by themselves, and placing the state-rooms, with their sleeping berths, along corridors attached ; and the cabins are, by the aid of numerous windows and spacious skylights, cushioned seats, convenient tables and rich paperhangings of chaste and tasteful designs, rendered as light and airy, and agreeable as could be desired. In the deck-house are more bathrooms and the whole forward part of it is occupied with a large "kitchen," divided into two cooking galleys, one for the passengers, the other for the crew. It is fitted in berths of two, with a large family berth on each side of the centre division. In the aft and forward ends of the deck-house, and in front of the poop, are covered companion-ways, leading to the 'tween decks below, which have a height of eight feet in the clear. Here, as in every other part of the ship, the cabins are well finished, and unusually spacious, and light is secured by means of large ventilating shafts, skylights, deck lights, and other appliances. The midship portion is appropriated to first-class passengers in berths of two, arranged on each side of a passage way, and the fore and after ends to intermediate passengers. The general arrangement is on the ordinary plan, with the state room ranged along either side of the vessel ; but there is observable a useful novelty in the intermediate portion of the ship, which consists in several of the state-rooms being fitted with berths for eith or ten people, made on the telescope princople, so as to slide quite out of the way, and give great room in the apartments when not required for sleeping purposes. . . . The Shipping gazette and Sydney general trade list. Volume 12, Number 560 (29 January, 1855) Page 28

SHANKLIN / PRINCE IVANHOE 1951
833 gross tons, 200ft x 46ft, twin screw, speed 14 knots, capacity for 1,290 passengers. Launched on 15th May 1951 by Wm. Denny & Bros, Dumbarton for Brirish Transport Commission (Southern Region), Portsmouth - Ryde service. 1979 sold to Sealink UK Ltd, same service. Feb.1980 final sailing and then put into reserve at Portsmouth until November when she was sold to Terry Sylvester and others (owners of the WAVERLEY) and sailed to the Clyde. 1981 sold to Firth of Clyde S.P. Co and renamed PRINCE IVANHOE. 2nd Aug.1981 made a Penarth - Lundy excursion trip. 3rd Aug.1981 struck a rock off Point Eynon, South Wales on a Swansea - Mumbles excursion, made for the shore but sank before beaching with the deck above water. Total loss. [Merchant Fleets, vol.24 by Duncan Haws]

SHAUME 1919
O.N.218282, 5,524 gross tons, length 390ft x beam 54.2ft, single screw, speed 11.5 knots. Cargo ship completed June 1919 by American International SB Corp., Hog Island, Pa. (Yard No.528) for the U.S. Shipping Board, Philadelphia. 1921 transferred to U.S. Navy, commissioned AG-11 and renamed PROCYON. 1931 loaned to State of New York as merchant schoolship, renamed EMPIRE STATE, 1940 became AMERICAN PILOT as training ship for U.S. Maritime Commission. 1948 scrapped at Wilmington, Del. [Register of Merchant Ships Completed in 1919 by Starke / Schell]

SHEAF MOUNT 1941 see LUCISTON 1924

SHENANDOAH 1893
SHENANDOAH was a 3885 gross ton ship, built by Alexander Stephen & Co, Glasgow for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad Co. She started sailings between Liverpool and Newport News in 1893. Transferred to the ownership of Furness Withy in 1907 she was eventually sunk on 14th Apr.1916 by a mine laid by the German submarine UC6 in the English Channel.[Furness Withy 1891-1991 by David Burrell]

SHERIDAN 1945
3,834 gross tons, 338.5ft x 20.1ft, engines aft, single screw, speed 11 knots. Built 1945 by Consolidated Steel Corp., Wilmington, Calif. as the HICKORY GLEN for U.S. War Shipping Admin. Chartered to the Ministry of War Transport, London and managed by China Navigation Co. 1947 Purchased by Lamport & Holt, Liverpool renamed SHERIDAN and re-commenced the New York - Brazil cargo service. 1960 transferred to the Austasia Line renamed MOTUPI. 1964 sold to Kie Hock Shipping, Hong Kong renamed TONG LAM. 1968 sold to Asia Selatan Enterprises Ltd. 27th Oct.1970 grounded on Scarborough Reef, 420 miles NW from Manila en route Korea - Chittagong with a cargo of pig iron. Broke into three sections - total loss.

SHROPSHIRE / SEANG BEE 1891
5,721 gross tons, 446ft x 49ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw, speed 14 knots. Built 1891 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the Bibby Line. Accommodation for 100-1st class passengers and used on the UK - India - Burma trade. 1909 sold to Lim Chin Tsong, Rangoon and renamed SEANG BEE. Then employed British officers and local crew. 1915 chartered for use as a troopship and used in Burmese and Indian waters and took part in the Dardanelles campaign. 1919 returned to her owners. 1931 scrapped. [Merchant Fleets, vol.29 by Duncan Haws]

SHROPSHIRE / ROTORUA 1911
11,911 gross tons, length 526.5ft x beam 61.5ft (160,51m x 18,74m), one funnel, two masts, twin screws and a speed of 14 knots. Accommodation for 131-1st, 270-2nd and 270-3rd class passengers. Built by John Brown & Co, Clydebank, Glasgow, she was launched on 27th Apr.1911 for the Federal Steam Nav. Co. Her maiden voyage started on 28th Oct.1911 when she left Liverpool for Cape Town, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. She was designed to reach Adelaide in 36 days. In 1912, 1st class was reduced to 66 and the emigrant berths were not used. Requisitioned for trooping in Aug.1914, she left Albany on 1st Nov.for the UK in the Great Australian Convoy of 38 Australian and New Zealand passenger ships escorted by Australian and Japanese cruisers. Decommissioned in 1917 and operated by the shipping controller on the Australia service, she was laid up at Falmouth in 1922 after a serious fire. In 1922-23 she was converted from coal to oil fuel, refitted to carry 117-1st class passengers and renamed ROTORUA. On 23rd Mar.1923 she entered service with the New Zealand Shipping Co between Southampton, Plymouth and New Zealand. In 1933 she was refitted to carry 400-tourist class passengers and in 1936 was transferred to NZSCo ownership. In 1939 she was placed under the control of the Ministry of War Transport and on 26th Oct.1940 left Lyttelton for Avonmouth via the Panama Canal and Halifax NS. In Dec.1940 she was appointed commodore ship of a convoy which was destined to lose most of it's ships and on 11th Dec, was torpedoed and sunk 110 miles West of St Kilda with the loss of 19 lives. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.7, New Zealand Shipping Co and Federal Lines]

SIBAJAK 1927
The SIBAJAK was a 12,040 gross ton ship, built in 1927 by De Schelde, Vlissingen for the East Indies service of Rotterdam Lloyd of Rotterdam. Her details were - length 161.5m x beam 19.1m (530ft x 62.7ft), one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 527 passengers in three classes and she carried a crew of 209. Launched on 2nd April 1927, she commenced her maiden voyage from Rotterdam to Batavia on 8th february 1928. In 1935 she was modernised and rebuilt to 12,226 tons and in 1940 was re-registered in Willemstad, Curacao and converted to a troop ship under the management of P&O Lines. In 1950 she made her first voyage as an emigrant ship between Rotterdam, Melbourne and Sydney and in 1951 returned to the Rotterdam - Indonesia service. Her first Rotterdam - Quebec voyage took place in April 1952 and her first Rotterdam - New York voyage in May 1952. Rebuilt in 1953 to 12,342 gross tons, she returned to the Rotterdam - Indonesia service in 1955 and on 25th August 1959 arrived at Hong Kong to be broken up. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.2,p.236] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

SIBERIA / MANILA 1867
The SIBERIA was built by J&G.Thomson, Glasgow in 1867 for the British & North American Royal Mail Steam Packet Co (Cunard Line). She was a 2,498 gross ton ship, length 320ft x beam 39.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Laid down as the SUMATRA, she was launched on 2nd July 1867 as the SIBERIA, and left Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Queenstown(Cobh) and New York on 24th Sep.1867. She started her last Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston - New York voyage on 7th Feb.1871 and on 21st March 1871 commenced Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston direct sailings. Her last sailing on this service started on 5th Sep.1878 and she was sold to Spanish owners in 1880. Renamed MANILA she was wrecked at San Juan, Puerto Rico on 11th May 1882. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.150]

SIBERIAN 1884
The SIBERIAN was a 3,904 gross ton ship, length 372ft x beam 45.2ft, one funnel, three masts, steel construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st, 50-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by the Govan Shipbuilding Co, Glasgow (engines by J.& J.Thomson, Glasgow), she was launched for the Allan Line on 12th Jun.1884. Her maiden voyage started on 19th Sep.1884 when she sailed from Glasgow for Quebec and Montreal. On 15th May 1891 she started her first Glasgow - New York sailing and on 5th May 1897 commenced her first Glasgow - Philadelphia voyage. Her last Glasgow - New York sailing started on 31st Dec.1904 and on 19th Nov.1910 she left St John's NF on her final voyage to Halifax and Glasgow. She was scrapped at Falmouth in 1912. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.316]

SICILIA / STUBBENHUK / KOMAGATA MARU / HEIAN MARU 1890
2,922 gross tons, length 329ft x beam 41.5ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Accommodation for 10-1st and 620-3rd class passengers. Built by C. Connell & Co, Glasgow (engines by D. Rowan & Son, Glasgow), she was launched for the Hansa Line on 13th Aug.1890 as the STUBBENHUK. Her maiden voyage started on 19th Oct.1890 when she left Hamburg for Quebec and Montreal and she was purchased by Hamburg America Line in March 1892. On 21st Apr.1892 she started her first Hamburg - Antwerp - Montreal voyage and in 1894 was renamed SICILIA. Her first Hamburg - Boston sailing started on 22nd Dec.1894, her first Stettin - Helsingborg - Gothenburg - New York on 8th May 1895, and the first of four Hamburg - Montreal sailings on 9th May 1896. On 9th Dec.1897 she commenced her last Stettin - New York sailing and on 13th Mar.1901 commenced Genoa - Naples - New York voyages. Her last Genoa - NY voyage started on 2nd Feb.1902 and in Apr.1902 she commenced the first of nine sailings between Odessa - Constantinople - Piraeus - New York. Sold to Japan in 1913, she was renamed KOMAGATA MARU and in 1925 became the HEIAN MARU. She was wrecked on 11th Feb.1926 near Cape Soidomai, Japan. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.398]

SICILIA 1900
Official No.113933, 6696 gross tons, 450ft x 52.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 90-1st and 70-2nd class passengers. Launched 22.12.1900 by Barclay Curle & Co, Glasgow for P & O's intermediate services to India, Australia and the Far East and trooping as required. Sep.1914 hired by the Admiralty for service as hospital ship (No.E.0261) and served in the Dardanelles for a period. 1926 scrapped Japan. [P & O, A Fleet History by S. Rabson & K. O'Donoghue, ISBN 0-905617-45-2 contains photo]

SICILIAN / BRUTON 1899
6,224 gross tons, length 430ft x beam 54.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st, 150-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Built by Workman, Clark & Co, Belfast, she was launched on 25th Aug.1899 for the Allan Line. Between 1899-1901 she was used for transport services to South Africa during the Boer War. On 28th Feb.1901 she started her first Liverpool - Portland voyage and started a single round voyage between Glasgow and New York on 16th Apr.1901. Her first Glasgow - Philadelphia sailing started 22nd May 1901 and her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailing on 6th Jul.1901. In 1906 she was refitted to carry 280-2nd and 900-3rd class passengers and in 1908 was rebuilt to 7,328 gross tons. Her first London - Quebec - Montreal voyage started in May 1908 and on 27th Aug.1914 she sailed from London and on the return voyage was used as a Canadian Expeditionary Force troopship. She then continued the London (later Liverpool) - Canada service and in 1917 came under the ownership of Canadian Pacific Ocean Services. Her first voyage after the Armistice started on 17th Dec.1917 and was from Liverpool to St John NB. Between March and June 1919 she was used to repatriate Belgian refugees and on 5th Jul.1919 commenced her first London - Quebec - Montreal sailing. She subsequently ran from Avonmouth, Glasgow, London or Antwerp to Canada. Her last London - St John NB voyage started 14th Nov.1921 and in Dec.1921 she inaugurated St John NB - Boston - Nassau - Havana service. Laid up at Portsmouth on 8th Aug.1922 and later at Southampton, she was renamed BRUTON in 1923 and used as a cargo steamer for Canadian Pacific. In May 1925 she was scrapped in Italy. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1p.321]

SICILIAN PRINCE (1) 1889
3,199 gross tons, 363.5ft x 42.2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 10 knots, accommodation for 77-1st and 49-2nd class passengers. She could also carry 350 deck passengers. Launched Nov.1889 by Scott & Co., Greenock as the MOCAMBIQUE for the Mala Real Portugueza, Lisbon for service to the Portuguese African colonies. 1902 sold to W. MacAndrew, Lisbon and renamed ALVAREZ CABRAL. 1902 resold to the Prince Line and renamed SICILIAN PRINCE for the Livorno - Genoa - Naples - Palermo - New York service. In 1908 she was chartered to Northwest Transport Line for four Rotterdam - Halifax - New York voyages and in 1910 was sold to Khedivial Mail SS & Graving Dock Co., London and renamed ABBASSIEH. 1931 scrapped in Italy.

SICILIAN PRINCE (2) 1922
3,489 gross tons, 363.3ft x 52.1ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 11 knots. Built 1922 by Furness SB Co., Haverton Hill as the ALLEGHANY for Warren Line, Liverpool. 1923 transferred to Rio Cape Line renamed CASTILIAN PRINCE. 1925 transferred to Prince Line and renamed SICILIAN PRINCE for Mediterranean services. 1946 sold to Cie. des Bateaux a Vapeurs Nord, Dunkirk, France renamed ALSACIEN. 1952 sold to Turkey renamed YOLAC.1963 scrapped in Turkey.

SIDI OKBA 1929
2,824 gross ton passenger / cargo ship, length 330.5ft x beam 43.1ft, single screw, speed 15 knots. Built 1929 by Ateliers & Chantiers de Bretagne, Nantes for Societe Generale de Transports Maritimes a Vapeur, Marseille, she was used on the Marseilles - North Africa routes. In Aug.1940 she was taken over by the French Navy and converted to an Auxiliary Sloop. 19th Dec.1942 seized by the Germans and handed to Italy for operation. Renamed CASERTA for the Italian Government and operated by Italia Soc. Anon di Nav, Genoa. 17th July 1943 burnt out at Naples and scuttled, refloated and repaired in 1947, she was then operated by Raffaele Romano, Naples. 1951 renamed LUANA for the same owner, she was scrapped 1958 at Savona.

SIDONIAN 1870
The SIDONIAN was a 1,236 gross ton ship, length 258ft x beam 32.3ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots. Built by Robert Duncan & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by Finnieston Steamship Works, Glasgow), she was launched for the Anchor Line on 5th May 1870. Her first of two round voyages between Glasgow, Moville and New York started 8th Jun.1870 and she then transferred to Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow sailings. Between 1872 and 1875 she also made nine Glasgow - Liverpool - Halifax - St. John, NB. voyages. In 1879-1880 she made two Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay sailings and in 1889 made her last voyage between Leghorn - Naples - Palermo and New York. After this she was used on the New York - Jamaica service until 1893 when she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.456 by N.R.P.Bonsor] [Merchant Fleets, vol.9 by Duncan Haws]

SIERRA / GDANSK 1900
5,989 gross tons, length 400.0ft x beam 50.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 17 knots. Built 1900 by W. Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia for Oceanic SS Co., San Francisco (Spreckels Line), she made her maiden voyage in Sep.1900 between San Francisco, Honolulu, Auckland and Sydney. 1907 laid up. 1910 transferred to San Francisco - Honolulu service. 1915 San Francisco - Sydney service. Jul.1918 - Sep.1919 became US Navy troopship and then returned to lay up. 1920 sold to Green Star SS Co., New York. 1921 sold to Polish American Navigation Corp., New York, one funnel removed, speed now 14 knots, renamed GDANSK. Used on the NY - Danzig service until 1922 when she reverted to the name SIERRA, owned by Walter A. Rush, NY. 1923 repurchased by Oceanic SS Co., refitted and 1924 resumed service San Francisco - Honolulu - Sydney. In 1934 control of the Oceanic SS Co. passed to the Matson Line and the SIERRA sailed for Japan under the name SIERRA MARU and was scrapped. [North Star to Southern Cross by J. Maber] [Register of Merchant Ships Completed 1900 by Starke / Schell]

SIERRA CORDOBA / CALLAO / RUTH ALEXANDER 1913
This was the North German Lloyd ship SIERRA CORDOBA. This was an 8,226 ton ship, 439ft x 56ft, twin screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 1,740 passengers. Built 1913 by A.G. Vulcan, Stettin, she sailed between Bremen, Antwerp, Rio, Montevideo and Buenos Aires. In Aug.1914 she sheltered in Montevideo after delivering there prisoners from ships sunk by the German raider KRONPRINZ WILHELM. On 18th Jan.1915 she left there with a cargo of coal for a rendezvous with the DRESDEN near Tierra del Fuego (The DRESDEN was the sole survivor of the Battle of the Falklands) The coal was transferred in lfeboats. Feb.1915 arrived Valparaiso and on 6th Mar.1915 left there with another load of coal for the DRESDEN, now hidden in Juan Fernandez Island. DRESDEN was later sunk there by HMS GLASGOW. SIERRA CORDOBA was then interned at Callao. In Sep. 1917 she was seized by Peruvian authorities and renamed CALLAO. Sep.1918 towed to California for repairs after being damaged by German crew in 1917. Initially used as a US Navy transport, in 1921 she was sold to the American owned Dollar Line and chartered to the Admiral Line, Seattle for coastal passenger services. 1923 renamed RUTH ALEXANDER. 1938 Dollar Line was taken over by the US Maritime Commission and in 1939 the RUTH ALEXANDER was taken over by American President Lines, rebuilt as a cargo ship and put under the Panamanian flag. On 31st Dec.1941 she was sunk by Japanese torpedo bombers off Balikpapan while escaping from Manila. [Norddeutscher Lloyd, vol.1 by Edwin Dretschel ISBN 1-895590-08-6 contains two photos of the ship]

SIERRA VENTANA / AMERIQUE 1913
Built in 1913 by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack for North German Lloyd of Bremen, this was a 8,262 gross ton ship, length 439.5ft x beam 56ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st, 80-3rd and 1,450-4th class passengers. Launched on 12/10/1912, she left Bremen on her maiden voyage to Antwerp, Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 18/1/1913. She sailed from Buenos Aires on her last voyage to Boulogne and Bremen on 7/7/1914. She arrived in Bremen shortly before the outbreak of the Great War and in 1920 was handed to the French Compagnie de Navigation Sud Atlantique, who renamed her ALBA and used her on their Bordeaux - South America service. In 1926 she went to Compagnie des Chargeurs Reunis and was renamed AMERIQUE and in 1936 was scrapped at Blyth.[South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

SIERRA VENTANA / SARDEGNA 1923
Built for North German Lloyd of Bremen by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack in 1923 for their South American service. This was a 11,452 gross ton ship, length 490.8ft x beam 61.8ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a service speed of 14 knots. There was capacity for 401-cabin class and 712-3rd class passengers. Launched on 16/5/1923, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 8/9/1923 and made her first Bremen - S.America sailing in 1924. In May 1926 she was refitted to carry cabin, tourist third cabin and 3rd class passengers, and started her last Bremen - New York voyage on 17/3/1932 (21 round voyages to NY). In 1935 she was sold to Italia and was renamed SARDEGNA. In 1937 she went to Lloyd Triestino and on 29/12/1940 was torpedoed and sunk by the Greek submarine PROTEUS near Saseno, Albania. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

SILESIA / PACIFICA / CITTA DI NAPOLI / MONTEVIDEO 1870
The SILESIA was the first of two vessls with this name owned by the Hamburg America Line and was built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1870. Her details were - 3,142 gross tons, length 339.9ft x beam 40ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 90-1st, 130-2nd and 520-3rd class passengers. Launched on 14/4/1869, she left Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Havre and New York on 23/6/1869. She commenced her last New York voyage on 24/2/1875 and was then laid up until 1877 when she was fitted with compound engines and was subsequently used on the Hamburg - West Indies service. In 1887 she was sold to H.F.Swan of Newcastle and renamed PACIFICA and in 1888 was resold to the Italian company, Lavarello, who renamed her CITTA DI NAPOLI. In 1891, she went to another Italian company, La Veloce, who named her MONTEVIDEO and on 2/12/1898 she was wrecked near the Lobos Island, River Plate. In 1899 she was refloated and broken up. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.390] [Merchant Fleets in Profile by D.Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line.]

SIMETO 1872
1,558 gross tons, 275.9ft x 32.5ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw. Launched Dec.1872 by A. McMillan, Dumbarton (engines by J. & G. Thomson, Glasgow) for "La Trinacria" Soc. Anon. di Nav. a Vapeur, Palermo. Oct.1876 fleet taken over by Florio, Palermo. Sep.1881 Florio combined with other companies to form Navigazione Generale Italiana. 1910 transferred to Servizi Marittimi. 1913 sold to Soc. Siciliana di Nav. a Vap., Palermo. 1914 sold to E. Ilardi & Figli, Messina. Mar.1916 scrapped at Messina.

SIMLA 1854
SIMLA 2441 gross tons, length 330ft x beam 38ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail) iron hull, single screw, speed 11 knots. Built 1854 by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, and immediately requisitioned as a Crimea War transport. 1857 chartered to the European & Australian Royal Mail Co for their Suez - Sydney service for three voyages. 1858 returned to P&O line's Suez - Calcutta route, 1871 sailed home via the Suez Canal and then transferred to the Southampton - Alexandria service. 1875 sold to Howdens of Glasgow and converted to a four-masted sailing ship. 1884 collided with the CITY OF LUCKNOW, taken in tow but sank with the loss of 20 lives.

SIMLA 1894
The SIMLA was a 5,884 gross ton ship, length 430ft x beam 49.3ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 90-1st and 66-2nd class passengers. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock for the P & O Steam Navigation Co, she was launched on 13th Oct.1894 and was used on Indian services and trooping as required. On 2nd Apr.1916 she was torpedoed and sunk off Malta by the German submarine U.39 with the loss of 10 crew. [P & O, A Fleet History by S. Rabson & K. O'Donoghue] The London - Bombay mail contract in 1873 was 23 days, this had fallen to 13 days by 1912 so the passage in 1894. However the mail ships were fast vessels, even in the 1870s so you can expect about a three week passage in 1899.

SINAIA 1924
8,567 gross tons, length 440ft x beam 56.1ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 132-cabin and 522-3rd class passengers. Launched on 19th Aug.1922 by Barclay, Curle & Co., Glasgow for the Fabre Line, Marseilles she started her maiden voyage from Marseilles to Naples and New York on 14th Oct.1924. She continued Mediterranean - New York until starting her last passenger voyage in Jun.1935 from Marseilles to Piraeus, Providence, New York and return to Marseilles. The world wide shipping slump caused the service to be discontinued. Nov.1942 seized by the Germans and converted to a hospital ship. Aug.1944 scuttled by Germans at Marseilles, 1946 raised and scrapped.

SIRIO 1883
The SIRIO was a 4141 gross ton ship, length 380ft x beam 42.1ft, two funnels, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 80-1st, 40-2nd and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow, she was launched 26th Mar.1883 for Societa Italiana di Trasporti Marittimi Raggio & Co, Genoa. She sailed from Glasgow for Genoa on 19th Jun.1883 and started her maiden voyage from Genoa to Las Palmas, Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 15th Jul.1883. In 1885 she transferred to the ownership of Navigazione Generale Italiana and started sailings for them on the same route on 21st Mar.1885. She was fitted with new engines in 1891 to give her a speed of 15 knots and continued South America voyages until 1906. On 4th Aug.1906 she was wrecked near Cape Palos, Spain with the loss of 442 lives.[South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

SIRIUS 1837
The SIRIUS was a 703 ton ship, 178ft x 25ft, clipper bows, one funnel, two masts, wooden hull, side paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 8 knots. Built by Robert Menzies & Son Leith (engines by Wingate & Co, Glasgow) in 1837 for the St.George Steam Packet Co. Chartered to the British & North American S.P.Co, she was responsible for starting the first North Atlantic steamship service and left London on 28th Mar.1838 for Cork (dep.4th Apr), New York (arr.23rd Apr, dep.1st May), Falmouth (arr.19th May) and London. She made a second voyage London - Cork (dep.31st May) - New York (arr.18th Jun, dep.1st Jul) - Plymouth (arr.16th Jul) - London. She only made these two transatlantic voyages and on 16th Jan.1847 was wrecked near Ballycotton, Ireland with the loss of 20 lives.[North Atlantic Seaway vol.1,p.59 by N.R.P.Bonsor]
The SIRIUS became the first ship to steam all the way from Europe to America and was commanded by Lieut. Richard Roberts RN, a native of Cork who died three years later when the PRESIDENT disappeared during an Atlantic crossing. After her two New York voyages, the SIRIUS commenced the work she was originally designed for, the coastal trade of the St. George S.P.Co. She normally plied between Cork, Liverpool and Glasgow until she was wrecked in 1847. On her first transatlantic voyage, she carried 40 passengers in three classes who paid 25, 20 and 8 guineas respectively. The passenger list included 9 ladies.["Irish Passenger Steamship Services" vol.2 by D. B. McNeil.]

SKAUBRYN 1951
She was a 9,786 gross ton ship, owned by I.M.Skaugen, Oslo who was mainly concerned in the cargo and tanker trades. After successfully converting another ship as an emigrant carrier to resettle displaced persons to Australia, he purchased the incompleted cargo carrier SKAUBRYN and finished building her as an emigant ship. Built by Oresundsvarvet A/B, Landskrona, she was completed by Howaldtswerke, Kiel with accommodation for 16-1st and 1,205-tourist class passengers and started her maiden voyage from Bremen to Malta, Port Said and Australian ports in March 1951. On one occasion she was chartered by the French Government for trooping work and in Nov.1956 was taken over by the British Ministry Transport to carry British troops from Singapore to the United Kingdom. Apart from these voyages, the SKAUBRYN made four voyages between Liverpool and Canada for the Greek Line in 1957, and then returned to the Bremen - Australia service. On 31st Mar.1958 she foundered in the Indian Ocean as the result of a fire in the engine room. Apart from one passenger dying from a heart attack in one of the lifeboats, there was no other loss of life among the 1,288 passengers. After this loss the service was withdrawn and Skaugum's other ship SKAUGUM was converted to a cargo ship. [North Star to Southern Cross by John Maber]

SKAUGUM / OSTMARK / OCEAN BUILDER 1945
11,626 gross tons, length 552ft x beam 66.6ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 1,700-single class passengers. Built by Germaniawerfte, Kiel, she was launched on 17th Jan.1940 as the OSTMARK for the Hamburg America Line but was laid up incomplete during the war. Surrendered to Britain in 1945 and sold by the Ministry of Transport to I.M.Skaugen, Oslo in 1948. Rebuilt at Howaldt Yard, Kiel as an emigrant ship, she was completed in Apr.1949 and placed on the Genoa - Australia emigrant service. Rebuilt in 1959 as a 11,111 ton bulk cargo ship and in 1964 was sold to Ocean Shipping & Enterprises, Monrovia and renamed OCEAN BUILDER. She was scrapped at Taiwan in 1972.[North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [Great Passenger Ships of the World, vol.4 by Arnold Kludas, ISBN 0-85059-253-4 contains photo of the ship]

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