FIRST NAME

LAST NAME

LOCALITY

   
TheShipsList Home Page Search the Passenger Lists Search Ship Company Fleet Lists Ship Descriptions and Voyage Histories  
Find Pictures of Ships, Ports, Immigration Stations
Find Diagrams & Photographs Ships' RiggingSearch Ship Arrivals from Newspapers &c
             
 
Search Marriages at Sea, British Ships
Search Numerous Files for Famine Emigrants, 1847Find Reports & Lists of Ship Wrecks Search 1862 Lists & Shipping Information Search Immigration & Ship Related Off-site Links              
Diaries & Journals | Immigration Reports | Illustrated London News | Trivia | Frequently Asked Questions
 

SHIP DESCRIPTIONS - S

S Descriptions SAA to SK | SL to SY

Please note that ships often changed hands and names many times. If an entry is just the name of the vessel followed by a "see..." then that vessel was renamed and you will find the full history under the redirected name.

SLAVONIA (1) / MACASSAR / LEROS 1883
The "Slavonia" was a 2215 ton vessel belonging to the Hamburg America Line. She was built by Raylton Dixon & Co. at Middlesborough in 1883 as the "Macassar" and later acquired the same year by HAL and renamed "Slavonia". Eventually sold to Deutsche Levante in 1897 and renamed "Leros". No longer in service in 1911. Stettin (on the Baltic Sea) is now in Poland and is called Szczecin. .[Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 15 June 1997]

The steamship SLAVONIA was built by Raylton, Dixon & Co, Middlesborough (ship #216), and launched on 24 May 1883, as the MACASSAR, for the Stoomvaart My. Insulinde, Amsterdam. 2,215 tons; 91,43 x 11,28 x 7,82 meters/300 x 37 x 25 ft 8 in (length x breadth x depth of hold); straight stem, 1 funnel, 2 masts; iron construction, 1 deck, forecastle 12,8 meters (42 ft), bridge 12,19 meters (40 ft), poop 15,24 meters (50 ft); single screw propulsion, compound engines (by R & W Hawthorn, Newcastle), service speed 11 knots; accommodation for 20 passengers in 1st class and 550 in steerage; crew of 50. 30 June 1886, purchased by the Hamburg-America Line; renamed SLAVONIA. 2 September 1886-16 April 1890, 25 roundtrip voyages, Stettin-Gothenburg-New York. July 1890-29 January 1893, Hamburg-New York. 21 March-22 December 1894, 6 roundtrip voyages, Stettin - Helsingborg - Gothenburg - Christiansand - New York. 1898, acquired by Deutsche Levante; renamed LEROS. 29 May 1906, stranded off Alderney. 1907, scrapped [Arnold Kludas and Herbert Bischoff, Die Schiffe der Hamburg-Amerika Linie, Bd. 1: 1847-1906 (Herford: Koehler, 1979), p. 45 (photograph); Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 394; Duncan Haws, Merchant Fleets in Profile, 4: The Ships of the Hamburg America, Adler and Carr Lines (Cambridge: Patrick Stephens, 1980), p. 42, no. 71]. - [Posted to The Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 24 October 1998]

SLAVONIA (2) / YAMUNA 1902
The steamship SLAVONIA was built by Sir J Laing & Sons, Sunderland (ship #600) (engines by Wallsend Slipway Co Ltd) and launched on 15 November 1902 as the YAMUNA for the British India Line. 10,606 tons; 155.44 x 18.13 meters/510 x 59.5 feet (length x breadth); 1 funnel, 2 masts; twin-screw propulsion (triple-expansion engines), service speed 13 knots; accommodation for 40 passengers in 1st class and 800 in steerage. June 1903, completed (8,831 tons). 1904, purchased by the Cunard Line; renamed SLAVONIA; refitted for the North Atlantic service (10,606 tons; accommodation for 71 passengers in 1st class, 74 passengers in 2nd class, and 1,954 in steerage). 17 March 1904, first voyage, Sunderland-Trieste (departed 29 March)-Fiume-Palermo-New York. 5 May 1909, last voyage, Trieste-Fiume-Palermo-New York. 11 June 1909, wrecked at Flores, in the Azores, without loss of life; the passengers were taken off by the steamships PRINZESS IRENE (Norddeutscher Lloyd) and BATAVIA (Hamburg-America Line) [Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1 (1975), p. 156; Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. 1: 1858-1912 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, c1972), pp. 98-99 (2 photographs)]. Also pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 310, from the Alex Shaw Collection, Steamship Historical Society of America, Langsdale Library, University of Baltimore, 1420 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, MD 21201 - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 19 August 1998]

SMIDT 1867
1,672 gross tons, length 210ft x beam 39.5ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 9 knots. Built by Johan Lange, Bremen, she was launched for H. Raschen on 16th Dec.1867. Her maiden voyage started 4th Apr.1868 when she left Geestemunde for London and New York and her second voyage from Bremen - New York commenced 26th Jun.1868. On 9th Oct.1873 she started her 20th and last New York sailing and in 1874 was sold, engines removed and converted to three masted barque. In Oct.-Nov. 1896 she was abandoned at sea, towed to Fayal, Azores and later to Hamburg where she was condemned. 1897 scrapped South Wales. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2, p.720 by N. R. P. Bonsor]
SMIDT was the first ocean going steamer built on the River Weser, or probably in Germany as a whole.Owned by Capt. H. Raschen and partners, she sailed from Geestemunde (between Bremen and Bremerhaven) on 4th Apr.1868 with cargo and 766 passengers. She experienced strong westerly gales during the entire passage and did not reach New York until 3rd May. Altogether she landed 3,032 passengers at NY in 1868 during the course of 4 voyages, the last three starting at Bremerhaven. The SMIDT's first voyage in 1869 nearly ended in disaster. She left Bremerhaven on 11th Jan., called at London and didn't reach New York until 5th March after experiencing a severe hurricane. She shipped a huge sea which washed the bridge overboard and filled the second cabin and engine room half full of water, lost deck stores and everything moveable on deck. The passengers suffered greatly. She made a further 7 round voyages in 1869-70 and then trace was lost for nearly two years, partly on account of the Franco-Prussian War. It appears that she changed ownership as she is recorded as being owned by Bremer Dampschiffahrt Ges. in 1872. She made 9 New York voyages in 1872-73 and in 1874 was sold to Siedenburg & Wendt, Bremen who removed her engines and ran her for more than 20 years as a 3-masted barque.

SMYRNA
I don't have much info on the SMYRNA, only that she was a clipper ship engaged in the wool trade. She was sunk in collision with the steamer MOTO on 28.4.1888 during thick fog off the Isle of Wight when outward bound to Sydney, with the loss of her captain and 11 crew. [The Colonial Clippers by Basil Lubbock]

SOBIESKI / GRUZIYA 1938
The SOBIESKI was a 11,030 gross ton ship, overall length 511.2ft x beam 67.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 70-1st, 270-cabin and 600-tourist class passengers. Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Walker-on-Tyne (engines by J. G. Kincaid & Co, Greenock), she was launched on 25th Aug.1938 for the Polish owned Gdynia-America Line. Her maiden voyage started on 15th Jun.1939 when she sailed from Gdynia for Brazil and Argentina. At the outbreak of the war in Sep.1939 she became an Allied troopship and was eventually returned to her owners in 1947. She resumed commercial service on 14th May 1947 when she left Genoa for Cannes and New York. She continued this service, calling at Naples on the eastbound voyage and from May 1948 many westbound calls were made at Halifax. In Feb.1950 she started her 29th and last North Atlantic voyage between Naples - Genoa - Cannes - Halifax - New York - Cannes - Genoa - Naples. Sold to Russian owners in Mar.1950, she was renamed GRUZIYA and was used on the Black Sea route between Odessa and Batum. On 14th Apr.1975 she arrived at La Spezia in tow to be scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.4,p.1600] [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.4,p.58-9]

SOBO / JUPITER 1898
3652 gross tons, length 354ft x beam 44ft (105.16m x 13.41m), one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 12 knots. Accommodation for 63-1st and 40-2nd class passengers. She was also licensed to carry 256-3rd class passengers on deck, but this would be for West African coastal trade. Launched on 29th Sep.1898 by Barclay Curle & Co, Glasgow for the African SS Co, she came under the ownership of Elder Line Ltd (Elder Dempster & Co) in 1908. In 1915 she was sold to the Admiralty and used as a torpedo depot ship at Scapa Flow and in 1920 was sold to Soc. Les Affreteurs Reunis, Le Havre and renamed JUPITER. She was scrapped in 1925. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, Elder Dempster Lines]

SOBRAON 1900
O.N.109253, 7,382 gross tons, length 450ft x beam 54.2ft x depth 31.6ft. Twin screw, speed 16 knots, accommodation for 114-1st and 57-2nd class passengers. Launched 17th Feb.1900 by Caird & Co, Greenock (Yard No.293) for P&O Steam Nav. Co. and delivered on 4th Apr.1900. On 24th Apr.1901 she was wrecked in dense fog on Tung Ying Island, NE of Foochow, China while on voyage Shanghai to London. Unsuccessful attempts were made by P & O's COROMANDEL to tow her off and the crew remained aboard to prevent looting. In May 1901 she was abandoned and subsequent attempts to sell the wreck were not successful. [P & O, A Fleet History by S. Rabson & K. O'Donoghue]

SOFIA HOHENBERG / SOFIA 1905
5,491 gross tons, length 360ft x beam 48ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 30-1st, 50-2nd and 1,550-3rd class passengers. Built by Lloyd Austriaco, Trieste, she was launched for Unione Austriaca on 3rd Sep.1905. Her maiden voyage started on 15th Dec.1905 when she left Trieste for Messina, Naples, Palermo and New York. Her eleventh and last voyage on this service started on 12th Jun.1907 from Trieste to Patras, Palermo and New York, and she was subsequently used on the South America service. After the Great War when Trieste came under Italian rule, she was transferred to Cosulich Line and renamed SOFIA. She made two Genoa - Naples - New York voyages with returning troops in 1919 and a single passenger voyage from Trieste to New York in Jan.1921. Scrapped in 1929.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1330]

SOLIS / MANHATTAN / MASSACHUSETTS / CITY OF LINCOLN 1866
The SOLIS was built by Palmer Bros & Co, Jarrow-on-Tyne in 1866. She was a 2,869 gross ton ship, length 335ft x beam 42.5ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 72-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 15/5/1866 as the MANHATTAN for the British owned Guion Line, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 8/8/1866. In 1874 she was rebuilt to 3,231 tons and fitted with compound engines by Fawcett & Preston, Liverpool and on 20/1/1875 commenced a single round voyage between Liverpool and Philadelphia, under charter to the American Line. She resumed the Liverpool - Queenstown - New York service on 4/4/1875 and started her last voyage on this route on 3/6/1875. She then went to Warren Line, was renamed MASSACHUSETTS and commenced Liverpool - Boston sailings on 1/1/1876. In 1881 she became the CITY OF LINCOLN for the Thistle Line and on 7/9/1881 sailed from Liverpool for New York and London, and on 29/10/1881 started London - New York crossings. She commenced her second and last voyage on this service on 23/12/1881 and in 1884 went to Spanish owners and was renamed SOLIS. In 1885 she was sold to Cassels of Liverpool and was fitted with triple expansion engines and went back to her previous name of CITY OF LINCOLN. On 15/8/1902 she was wrecked near Cape Town with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.708]

SOMERSET / ALI SAIB PASHA 1875
Built for Great Western 1875. Mostly Bristol or Swansea - New York. Some Canada sailings. Sold Turkish owners 1886 - became ALI SAIB PASHA.

SOMERSETSHIRE / PRINCE EDWARD 1867
2,342 gross tons, iron construction, single screw, speed 9 knots. Built 1867 by Wigram, Blackwall, London for Money, Wigram & Co, London. Left London on 20th Jun.1867 for Port Phillip and continued Australia sailings until commencing her last to Melbourne and Sydney on 31st Jul.1880. 1882 sold for conversion to sailing ship. 1885 renamed PRINCE EDWARD.[North Star to Southern Cross by J.M.Maber]

SOMERSETSHIRE 1921
7,450 gross tons, length 450.3ft x beam 57.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 12 passengers.
Built 1921 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast as a tin ore carrying cargo ship for Bibby Line but was used as a normal cargo ship on charter to Royal Mail Steam Packet Co's service to Vancouver. 1927 converted by Vickers Ltd, Barrow into a permanent troopship with accommodation for 1,300 troops and her first sailing was to China. Jan.1928 trooped to Karachi until May when laid up at Dartmouth. 1931 trooping to China. Sep.1939 converted to hospital ship No.25 with 507 beds and 118 medical staff. Apr.1940 took part in the withdrawal from Narvik. Apr.1940 bombarded by German artillery while evacuating wounded from Tobruk. 1941 worked in Red Sea to South Africa, Australia and New Zealand returning their wounded. 7th Apr.1942 torpedoed in the Mediterranean by U.453, medical staff and crew were evacuated by a Greek destroyer. She was later reboarded and made her way to Alexandria on one engine. 1944-1946 hospital ship work world wide. 1948 rebuilt to an assisted emigrant ship with accommodation for 550 passengers and used on the Liverpool - Australia service. 1953 trooped to Kenya during the Mau Mau troubles. 1954 scrapped at Barrow. [Merchant Fleets, vol.29 by Duncan Haws]

SOMMELSDYK 1939
The SOMMELSDYK was the third vessel of that name owned by the Holland America Line. She was a 9,227 gross ton ship, length 473ft x beam 62ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15.5 knots. She had accommodation for 12 cabin class passengers. Built by A.P.Moller, Odense in 1939 for the New York - Java via Capetown service and in August 1942 was converted into a US transport. On Christmas Day 1944 she was hit by an aerial torpedoe in Leyte Gulf, causing a 30ft x 20ft hole but was repaired and on 9th May 1946 was returned to the Dutch government, refitted and chartered to Holland America Line. On 4th June 1965 she was sold for scrap to Castelon, Spain and broken up. Her sister ship was the SLOTERDYK. [Holland America Line by Peter C.Kohler]

SONTAY 1936 / BAYERN 1921
9,014 gross ton passenger / cargo ship, length 466ft x beam 58ft, one funnel, four masts, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 16-1st and 750-3rd class passengers, built 1921 by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack as the BAYERN for Hamburg America Line, Hamburg. Used on the Hamburg - New York service. In 1936 she was sold to Union Maritime Mediteraneenne, Dunkirk, renamed SONTAY and used as a Foreign Legion troopship for the Indo-China service. In 1940 she remained with the Vichy French. On 26th Jan.1941 she was captured by British warships 120 miles from Sainte Marie while on voyage Tamatave to Dakar and escorted into Durban. She then became a transport ship for the Ministry of War Transport, managed by Union-Castle Mail SS Co. Jul.1946 returned to her owners and 1948 transferred to Messageries Maritimes, Dunkirk and returned to trooping. In 1951 she trooped to Korea during the United Nations war there. 1955 sold to Transportes Maritimos Atlantida S.A, Panama (Wheelock, Marden & Co, Hong Kong) and renamed SUNLOCK. 1959 scrapped at Sakai, Japan. [Register of Merchant Ships by Starke / Schell] [Merchant Fleets, vol.36 by Duncan Haws]

SOPHOCLES / IONIC 1883
The "Sophocles" was a 4,748 gross ton, 14 knot ship belonging to the Aberdeen Line (Geo.Thompson & Co). She was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1883 as the "Ionic" for the White Star Line and was bought by Aberdeen Line in 1900. On 23/10/1900 she commenced her first voyage from London to Capetown, Melbourne and Sydney, and started her last sailing on 21/8/1906. She was scrapped at Morecombe in 1908. [North Star to Southern Cross by John. M. Maber]

SOPHOCLES / TAMAROA 1922
12,341 gross tons, length 500.4ft x beam 63.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 13.5 knots, accommodation for 130-1st and 422-2nd class passengers. Launched by Harland & Wolff, Belfast on 22nd Sep.1921 for the Aberdeen Line, she started her maiden voyage on 1st Mar.1922 when she sailed from London for Capetown, Sydney and Brisbane. Chartered to Shaw Savill & Albion Line in 1926, she was renamed TAMAROA, converted to oil fuel with a speed of 15 knots, and used on the Southampton - Panama - Wellington service. 1931 refitted to carry 130-cabin class passengers. 1932 taken into Shaw Savill & Albion Line ownership from the receiver of the Aberdeen Line. 1940 Converted to a troopship. 1948 resumed commercial service London - Panama - Wellington with accommodation for 372-tourist class passengers. 24th Oct.1956 started her final voyage. March 1957 arrived at Blyth for scrapping. [Merchant Fleets, vol.17 by Duncan Haws]

SORRENTO 1881
The SORRENTO was a 2,364 gross ton ship, length 320ft x beam 36.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 600-3rd class passengers only. Built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow for the Sloman Line's Hamburg - Australia service, she was launched on 21st Dec.1881. Transferred to the newly formed Union Line in 1886, she started her first Hamburg - New York sailing on 24th Apr.1886. She continued this service until commencing her last Hamburg - New York sailing on 13th Sep.1899. On 10th Nov.1902 she was wrecked near Cape Finisterre, Spain.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1166]

SOUTHERN VENTURER / SOUTHERN VENTURER MARU 1945
The SOUTHERN VENTURER was a whale factory ship belonging to the Sevilla Whaling Co. Ltd (Christian Salvesen & Co), Leith. She was 14,418 gross tons, length 539.7ft x beam 74.4ft, two funnels (side by side). Built in 1945 by Furness Shipbuilding Co, Haverton Hill-on-Tees, she made one voyage a year to the Antarctic to service the whale catchers and process the catch. Sold to Nippon Suisan Co, Tokyo in 1962, she was renamed SOUTHERN VENTURER MARU.

SOUTHSEA 1948
837 gross tons, 300ft x 46ft, one funnel, one mast, twin screw, speed 14 knots, capacity for 1,135 passengers. Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Dumbarton, she was ordered by Southern Railway, but delivered to British Transport Commission (Southern Region) on 19th Sep.1948. Used on the Portsmouth - Ryde, Isle of Wight service. 15th June 1953 took part in the Coronation review. 1979 transferred to Sealink UK Ltd - same service. 21st Jan.1980 collided with Portsmouth Harbour Pier and put out of action temporarily. 1986 replaced by catamaran ferries and used as a reserve ship. plus excursion work. Aug.1987 chartered to Waverley S.N. Co to replace the broken down WAVERLEY. Oct.1987 laid up in River Fal. 1992 still afloat but no later information.

SOUTHWARK 1893
The "Southwark" was a 8,607 gross ton vessel built in 1893 by Wm.Denny & Bros, Dumbarton for the American Line. Her details were - length 480ft x beam 57.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was accommodation for 100-2nd and 929-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4th July 1893, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Philadelphia on 28th Dec. 1893. In 1895 she went to the Red Star Line and commenced her first voyage from Philadelphia to New York and Antwerp on 8th Aug. 1895. On 31st Aug. 1895 she commenced her first Antwerp - New York run and in 1899 (or earlier) her 2nd class accommodation was increased to 250. She sailed on her last voyage on the Antwerp - New York on 21st March 1903 and was then chartered to the Dominion Line and commenced running for their Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal service on 13th May 1903. In May 1910 she was chartered to the Allan Line and ran between Glasgow, Quebec and Montreal. On 9th July 1910 she commenced her last Montreal - Quebec - Glasgow sailing (2 round voyages) and went back to the Dominion Line. In May 1911 she made her last Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailing and was scrapped the same year.

SOWWELL 1900
3,781 gross ton cargo steamer, length 340ft x beam 49.6ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 10 knots. Built 1900 by Wm. Gray & Co, West Hartlepool as the KENLEY for Middleton, Houlder & Co, London. 1913 purchased by Roth Bros (Atlantic Traders Ltd), London renamed SOWWELL, 1914 purchased by Furness, Withy & Co. On 19th Apr.1917 she was torpedoed and sunk by U.35 while 170 miles west of Gibraltar on passage Sagunto to the Clyde with a cargo of iron ore. She sank at once and all 21 crew were lost. [Furness, Withy by Duncan Haws]

SPAIN 1871
4,512 gross tons, length 425.4ft x beam 43.2ft,, two funnels, four masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 120-1sr and 1.400-3rd class passengers.
Built in drydock by Laird Bros, Birkenhead for the National Line, Liverpool, she was floated out on 7th May 1871 and started her maiden voyage on 16th Aug.1871 from Liverpool to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. On 20th Feb.1883 she was chartered to Inman Line for two round voyages and on 11th Feb.1890 started her first London - New York voyage. 23rd Nov.1890 last voyage Liverpool - New York. 31st Jan.1896 last voyage London - New York. 1896 scrapped.

SPREE / KAISERIN MARIA THERESIA / URAL 1890
The SPREE was a 6,963 gross ton ship, length 463ft x beam 51.8ft, two funnels, three masts, steel construction, single screw and a speed of 18 knots. There was accommodation for 244-1st, 122-2nd and 460-3rd class passengers. Built by AG Vulcan, Stettin, she was launched for North German Lloyd on 17th May 1890 and started her maiden voyage on 11th Oct.1890 when she left Bremen for Southampton and New York. On 26th Nov.1892 she fractured her propeller shaft and was towed to Queenstown (Cobh) by the Beaver Line ship LAKE HURON. After repairs at Milford Haven she resumed service. She suffered the same mishap on 5th Jul.1897 and was again towed to Queenstown, this time by the Atlantic Transport Line ship MAINE. Her last Bremen - Southampton - New York sailing started on 16th Nov.1897 and she was then rebuilt to 7,840 gross tons, lengthened to 526ft, fitted with twin screws, three funnels and two masts. Renamed KAISERIN MARIA THERESIA with accommodation for 405-1st, 114-2nd and 387-3rd class passengers, she resumed Bremen - Southampton - New York voyages on 13th Mar.1900. Her last voyage started on 26th Sep.1903, having made 29 round voyages as the KMT including 7 Mediterranean - New York sailings. In 1904 she was sold to Russia, renamed URAL and converted to an auxiliary cruiser. She was sunk at the Battle of Tsushima on 27th May 1905. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.555]

ST. ANDREW / WALDENSIAN 1861
The ST.ANDREW was built by Barclay & Curle, Glasgow in 1861 for the Allan Line. She was a 1,432 gross ton ship, length 253ft x beam 33.9ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st and 350-3rd class passengers. Launched on 8th Aug.1861 as the ST.ANDREW, she started her maiden voyage on 28th Sep.1861 when she left Glasgow for Quebec and Montreal. She started her last sailing on this service on 23rd Oct.1872, and in 1873 was rebuilt to 2,256 tons, lengthened to 322.5ft, re-engined and renamed WALDENSIAN. Her first Glasgow - Portland voyage started 22nd Jan.1874 and on 12th Feb.1880 she commenced her first Glasgow - Halifax - Boston voyage. Fitted with triple expansion engines in 1888, she started her last North Atlantic voyage on 16th Apr.1891 between Glasgow, Halifax and Philadelphia. She subsequently ran on the South American service and started her final voyage on 22nd Nov.1902 between Glasgow, Montevideo and Buenos Aires. She was scrapped at Genoa in 1903.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.309-310]

ST. DAVID / PHOENICIAN 1864
The PHOENICIAN was a 1516 gross ton ship, length 272ft x beam 34.3ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots. Accommodation for 30- 1st and 350-3rd class passengers. Built by Barclay & Curle, Glasgow, she was launched as the ST. DAVID for the Allan Line 4th Jun.1864. Her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal started on 21st Jul.1864 and she started her last Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailing on 24th Sep.1872. In 1873 she was lengthened to 334.9ft, 2,356 gross tons, re-engined and renamed PHOENICIAN. She resumed Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyages under this name on 12th Jun.1873 and on 5th Dec.1876 started her first Glasgow - South America sailing. On 14th Nov.1879 she commenced her first Glasgow - Halifax - Boston voyage and on 5th Jun.1884 started her first sailing from Glasgow to Philadelphia. Again re- engined in 1888, she commenced her last North Atlantic voyage from Glasgow to Boston on 9th Aug.1888 and was subsequently used on the South America service. Her final voyage started from Glasgow to Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 22nd Jul.1903 and in 1905 she was scrapped at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.311]

ST. DAVID 1932
The ST. DAVID was a 2,702 gross ton ship, 327.2ft x 46.7ft, twin screw, speed 22 knots, capacity for 1,050 passengers. Built 1932 by Cammell Laird & Co., Birkenhead for Great Western's Fishguard - Rosslare service and in 1939 became Hospital Ship No.27. with 267 beds, 58 medical staff and 93 crew, based at Newhaven. In May 1940 she was present at the evacuation from Dunkirk. She arrived in the Mediterranean in June 1943 and was based at Malta together with the ST. ANDREW. On 25th Jan.1944 she was sunk while 25 miles south of Anzio during the Italian landings with the loss of 55 lives. ST. ANDREW picked up many of the survivors. In total she had carried over 6,000 patients and steamed some 25,000 miles as a Hospital Ship. [Merchant Fleets, vol.24 by Duncan Haws]

ST. GEORGE 1861
1,468 gross tons, length 253ft x beam 33.9ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 9 knots. Accommodation for 30-1st and 350-3rd class passengers. Built by R. Steele & Co., Greenock (engines by Greenock Foundry Co), for the Allan Line, she was launched on 9th Aug.1861 and started her maiden voyage on 22nd Oct.1861 when she left Glasgow for Quebec and Montreal. On 29th Apr.1869 she was wrecked near Seal Island with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.310 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

ST. LOUIS / CHEANG CHEW 1870
The ST.LOUIS was built by R. Clover & Co, Birkenhead (engines by J. Jack & Co, Liverpool) for the Dominion Line of Liverpool. She was a 1,827 gross ton ship, length 301.3ft x beam 35ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 50-cabin and 500-3rd class passengers. Launched on 31st Jul.1870, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to New Orleans on 6th Oct.1870. On 12th Jun.1872 she started a single round voyage between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal and on 12th May 1877 commenced her first Liverpool - Halifax - Philadelphia sailing. Her third and last voyage on this service started 22nd Aug.1877 and in 1882 she was sold and fitted with compound engines. In 1889 she was again sold, this time to Singapore owners and renamed CHEANG CHEW. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.803]

ST. LOUIS / LOUISVILLE 1894
The ST.LOUIS was an 11,629 gross ton ship, built by W.Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia in 1894 for the American Line. Her sister ship was the ST.PAUL. Her details were - length 535.5ft x beam 63ft, straight stem, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 350-1st, 220-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12/11/1894, she sailed from New York on her maiden voyage to Southampton on 5/6/1895. She started her last Southampton - New York crossing on 16/4/1898 before being used as an auxiliary cruiser for use in the Spanish-American war. On 12/10/1898 she resumed New York - Southampton sailings and in 1903 was fitted with new boilers and had her funnels heightened. In 1913 she was refitted to carry 2nd and 3rd class passengers only and on 15/7/1914 sailed on her last Southampton - Cherbourg - Queenstown - New York voyage. Transferred to the New York - Liverpool service on 31/7/1914 until April 1918 when she commenced her last Liverpool - New York crossing, she then became the US government ship LOUISVILLE. On 9/1/1920 she was damaged by fire while being refitted for the New York - Southampton service, and was sold as an exhibition ship but not used as such. On 20/5/1924 she left New York under tow for Genoa where she was scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.943]

ST. LOUIS 1928
16,732 gross tons, length 543.8ft x beam 72.4ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 16 knots, accommodation for 270-cabin, 287-tourist and 416-3rd class passengers. Launched by Bremer Vulkan, Vegesack on 2nd Aug.1928 for the Hamburg America Line, she left Hamburg on her maiden voyage to Boulogne, Southampton and New York on 29th Mar.1929. Her last voyage commenced 27th Aug.1939 when she left New York without passengers for Murmansk and Hamburg, arriving on 1st Jan.1940. In 1940 she became an accommodation ship at Kiel and was heavily damaged in an Allied air attack on 30th Aug.1944. Towed to Hamburg in 1946, she was used as a hostel and sold in 1950. Scrapped at Bremerhaven in 1952.[North Atlantic Seaway vol.1 by N.R.P.Bonsor] This was the infamous ship which carried 900 Jewish refugees from Germany to Cuba in 1939 where they were refused entry. She returned to Antwerp where they disembarked and many of them subsequently perished in concentration camps.

ST. MIHIEL 1920
Completed May 1920 by American International Shipbuilding Corp, Hog Island, Pa. for the US Shipping Board, Philadelphia. 1922 US Army transport. Jul.1941 commissioned (AP-32) for US Navy. Nov.1943 US Army - hospital ship. 1946 decommissioned and passed to US Maritime Commission and laid up until scrapped at Baltimore by Patapsco Scrap Co in 1957. Try to get hold of a book called "The Hog Islanders" by Mark H.Goldberg, ISBN 1-879-180-01-5. This gives a very detailed history and photo of this ship and should be available on inter library loan.

ST. OLAF 1871
The ST.OLAF was a 1,935 gross ton ship, built by Wigham Richardson & Co, Walker-on-Tyne (engines by North Eastern Marine Co, Sunderland) in 1871 for the Norse American Line. Her details were - length 293.9ft x beam 35.2ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 30-1st and 500-3rd class. Launched in April 1871, she sailed from Bergen on her maiden voyage to New York on 7/7/1871. She continued on this service until starting her last voyage on 17/5/1875. Little is known about this ship after this, but she was sold in 1880 and eventually scrapped in 1903 at Genoa. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2, p.777 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

ST. OSYTH / SINGAPORE 1873
3541 gross tons, clipper bows, speed 12 knots. Built by Mitchell & Co, Newcastle in 1873 for Watts, Milburn & Co's China tea trade. On 31st Oct.1874 she made a single round voyage from London to Capetown and Melbourne for Anderson, Anderson & Co, and on 5th May 1875 started regular London - Capetown - Melbourne - Sydney sailings for the Colonial Line. Her last sailing on this route started on 30th Jun.1877 and in 1879 she was sold to R. Rubbatino, Genoa and renamed SINGAPORE. Passenger fares to Australia in this ship ranged from 70 guineas for 1st class to 15 guineas for steerage accommodation. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M. Maber]

ST. PATRICK / JOHN BELL / DIAMANT / NINI FRAVEGA 1854
The ST.PATRICK was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1854. She was a 1,101 gross ton ship, length 231.4ft x beam 32ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. There was accommodation for 36-1st plus 290-2nd & 3rd Class passengers. Launched on 16th May 1854 for John Bell as the sailing ship JOHN BELL, she was fitted with engines by Randolph Elder & Co, Glasgow in 1857. Advertised to sail from Glasgow to Quebec and Montreal for Anchor Line in July 1857, the sailing was cancelled and on 23rd Jul.1857 she sailed from Glasgow to Dublin and Calcutta as an Indian Mutiny transport. Chartered to Anchor Line, she started her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 20th May 1859. On 12th Nov.1859 she commenced her first Glasgow - New York sailing and between 1859-61 she sailed Glasgow - New York in the winter and Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal in the summer. In Oct.1861 she made her last Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailing for Anchor Line and then made two Liverpool - New York voyages for her owners. On 25th Jun.1862 she started a single round voyage between Liverpool and Quebec and was then chartered to Allan Line and started Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyages on 16th Aug.1862. In 1863 she was purchased by the Allan Line, renamed ST.PATRICK and resumed Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 16th Jul.1863. Her last sailing on this service started on 17th Jul.1874 and her engines were removed in 1875. Sold to C.M.D.Jorgensen of Germany in 1879 and renamed DIAMANT, in 1894 she was resold to Esedi del fu Bernardo Fravega, Genoa and renamed NINI FRAVEGA. In 1896 she was broken up at Genoa after going aground and being condemned.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.451][Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line]

ST. PATRICK 1930
The ST. PATRICK was owned by the Fishguard & Rosslare Railway & Harbour Company which was owned jointly by Great Western and the Irish Great Southern & Western Railway Companies. She was 1,911 gross tons, 281.3ft x 41.1ft, twin screw, speed 22 knots. Capacity for 216-1st and 116-3rd class passengers. Built 1930 by Alex Stephen & Sons, Glasgow, she made her maiden voyage on Apr.18th from Weymouth to the Channel Islands. She was intended as a relief ship for both the Weymouth - Channel Islands and the Fishguard - Rosslare services but spent most of her time based at Weymouth. On 5th Aug.1932 she went aground in fog at La Corbiere, flooding her engine room. Her passengers were taken off and she was towed to St. Aubins Bay, later to St. Helier and then to Plymouth and Birkenhead, where she was repaired. In 1939 she trooped until October, and then returned to the Fishguard - Rosslare route. 13th Jun.1941 bombed and sunk by German aircraft inbound for Fishguard (the third attack). The ship broke in two and sank. 19 crew, including G.W.R's Commodore Faraday and 10 passengers were lost. Stewardess E. M. Owen received the George Medal for passenger rescue work. [Merchant Fleets, vpl.24 by Duncan Haws]

ST. PETERSBURG / ARCHANGEL 1910 O.N.123940
2,448 gross tons, length 330.8ft x beam 43.2ft, tripple screw, speed 20 knots, capacity for 320-1st, 130-2nd and 300-unberthed passengers.
Built 1910 by J. Brown & Co. Ltd, Clydebank (Yard No.397) for the Great Eastern Railway Co's Parkestone to Hook of Holland service. 1915 renamed ARCHANGEL and used as a cross channel troopship. In 1923 she came under the ownership of London & North Eastern Railway Co., Harwich. June 1940 assisted in British evacuation from France. 16th May 1941 bombed in position 57.55N 02.03W and beached off Black Dog, 5 miles south of Newburgh on voyage Kirkwall to Aberdeen with troops and equipment. Total loss.

ST. SUNNIVA 1931
O.N.162280, was a 1,368 gross ton passenger ship, length 252.6ft x beam 35.2ft, single screw, speed 15 knots, built 1931 by Hall, Russell & Co., Ltd, Aberdeen (Yard No.723) for the North of Scotland, Orkney & Shetland Steam Navigation Co., Ltd, Aberdeen. She had clipper bows, teak polished deck houses and was painted white. Fitted with portable cattle and sheep stalls in the holds and used principally on the Aberdeen - Lerwick passenger service. In Aug.1939 she was requisitioned by the Admiralty as a guardship, Sep.1940 converted to an accommodation ship, Sep.1942 became a convoy rescue ship. Missing since last sighted on 21st Jan.1943 off Sable Island on voyage Greenock to Halifax, presumed capsized in severe icing conditions. There are good plans of the ship in "Coastal and Short Sea Liners" by C. V. Waine ISBN 0-905184-17-3 which should be available on inter library loan.

STAD HAARLEM / FERDINAND DE LESSEPS 1875
The STAD HAARLEM, as a result of a proposal by the New Zealand authorities who had been investigating the possibility of direct steam communication with the United Kingdom, the New Zealand Shipping Co, in association with Shaw Savill & Co chartered the ship from the Royal Netherlands Steamship Co. She left London on 5th Feb.1879 and sailed via St Vincent and the Cape to Port Chalmers and Wellington. Despite a full cargo and a full complement of passengers, including some 600 emigrants, the voyage wasn't a financial success. She left Lyttelton in May 1879 for the return passage but once again the charter resulted in a considerable financial loss and the ship only made the one NZ voyage. The STAD HAARLEM was a 2,729 gross ton ship, length 106,67m x beam 11,98m (350ft x 38.3ft), one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Built by A.& J. Inglis, Glasgow, she was launched on 23rd Jan.1875 for the Royal Netherlands Steamship Co. and was intended for the Amsterdam - New York service. Due to a severe slump in the North Atlantic trade, she was used on the Holland - Mediterranean service. After being chartered for the NZ voyage, she was sold to the French Line in 1879 and renamed FERDINAND DE LESSEPS. Her first voyage for this company started on 14th Sep.1879 when she left Marseilles for Panama. On 30th Oct.1880 she started the first of three Havre - New York sailings and on 28th Apr.1881 commenced Marseilles - New York voyages. Her seventh and last voyage on this service started on 10th Jun.1882. Then used on various other routes and scrapped at Dunkirk in 1911.[North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber] [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.654; vol.3,p.1066]

STANREALM / FORTUNE LORY 1944
7062 gross tons, built 1944 by Bartram & Sons, Sunderland for J.A.Billmeir & Co, London (Stanhope Steamship Co). In July 1950 she lost her propeller in the Indian Ocean and drifted for 10 days before being taken in tow by the CAPE YORK, which towed her to Mauritius. Sold in 1960 to Liberty Shipping Co, Hong Kong, but still under the British flag, she was renamed FORTUNE LORY. On 1st Sep.1962 she was driven aground by a typhoon while laid up at Hong Kong. Refloated, she was declared a constructive total loss and scrapped sold to HK shipbreakers in June 1963.

STAR OF GREECE 1868
1,289 gross tons, length 227ft x beam 35ft x depth 22.2ft, iron hull, three masted full rigged ship, built 1868 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for James P. Corry & Co. Launched on 19th Sep.1868, she was a fast ship and sailed London - Calcutta via the Cape in 79 days and her fastest passage from the Lizard to Melbourne took 76 days. Her best London - Calcutta - London voyage took 5 months 27 days including 10 days at Calcutta and this has never been beaten by a sailing ship. For this, she mounted a brass gamecock at the truck of her mainmast "Cock of the Route". Another feature is that the ship always flew a silk Greek flag on the foremast in port, which had been made and presented by ladies of the Greek community in Calcutta. In August 1883 she sailed through a sea of pumice after the violent eruption of Mount Krakatoa while some hundred miles away in the Indian Ocean. She arrived in the Hooghly in 1885 with her coal cargo on fire, but was brought in safely. Transferred to the Australia service in 1888, she left Port Adelaide on 12th July with a cargo of wheat and on 13th July, 25 miles off course in a fierce gale and hailstorm, and with her anchors down, she was wrecked at 03.00 on a reef outside Port Willunga, Gulf of St. Vincent, South Australia and broke in half. Ten out of 27 saved (including 3 stowaways). Captain Harrower was 29, having been in command since he was 23. It was his third voyage in her and he was drowned. Despite being visible to all on shore, rescue appliances only arrived 14 hours after it was all over. The wreck was sold for £105 and the cargo for £21. The figurehead is in Port Adelaide Maritime Museum. [Merchant Fleets, vol.21 by Duncan Haws]

STAR OF THE WEST 1852
1172 tons, length 228.3ft x beam 32.7ft, wooden hull, side paddle wheels, two masts. Launched 17th Jun.1852 by Jeremiah Simonson, New York for Vanderbilt, she started sailings between New York and San Juan de Nicaragua on 20th Oct.1852 and continued this service for Charles Morgan from Jul.1853 to Mar.1856. She started New York - Aspinwall sailings for the United States Mail SS Co in Jun.1857 and in Sep.1859 went onto the New York - Havana - New Orleans service. Chartered to the War Department in Jan.1861, she was seized by Confederate forces and later burned. As you can see from this, the journey involved a land crossing and a further voyage on another ship.

STATE OF ALABAMA / ALABAMA 1873
The "State of Alabama" was built by T.Wingate & Co, Glasgow in 1873 for the British, State Line. She was a 2,313 gross ton ship, length 321.2ft x beam 36.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 30-1st, 50-intermediate and 200-3rd class passengers. Launched on 11/3/1873 as the "Alabama" she she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Larne and New York on 24/6/1873. In Dec.1873 she was renamed "State of Alabama" and in the same month commenced sailings between Liverpool and New Orleans. On 27/2/1874 she started her first Glasgow - New York voyage and her last voyage on this route commenced on 17/2/1888. She subsequently carried cargo only and in 1891 was sold to the Allan Line, but never sailed for them. She was resold and eventually scrapped in 1896. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.866]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA / CALIFORNIAN / COAMO 1891
4,244 gross tons, length 386ft x beam 46.1ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 256-1st, 100-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Built by A. Stephen & Sons, Glasgow, she was originally laid down for the State Line, but was launched on 29th Jan.1891 for Allan Line. Her maiden voyage started 14th Aug.1891 when she sailed from Glasgow for New York and her last on this service started 22nd Oct.1896. She was then chartered to Anchor Line for three Glasgow - New York voyages before being returned to Allan Line and transferring to Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailings on 13th May 1897. In 1898 she was renamed CALIFORNIAN and started her first Liverpool - Portland sailing on 10th Mar.1898. On 25th Feb.1900 she stranded near Portland but was refloated and on 30th Aug.1900 resumed Glasgow - New York sailings. Her fourth and last sailing on this route commenced 20th Dec.1900 and in 1901 she was sold to the American owned New York & Porto Rico SS Co and renamed COAMO. 1925 scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.319 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

STATE OF GEORGIA / GEORGIA 1873
The STATE OF GEORGIA was a 2,490 gross ton ship, length 330.3ft x beam 36.3ft, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 12 knots. Accommodation for 70-1st, 40-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Built by The London & Glasgow Co, Glasgow, she was launched on 13th Jun.1873 as the GEORGIA for the British owned State Line. She started her maiden voyage on 12th Sep.1873 when she left Glasgow for Larne and New York and was renamed STATE OF GEORGIA in Dec. of the same year. She commenced her last voyage from Glasgow to Moville and New York on 7th Mar.1891 for these owners, and was then sold to the Allan Line and made two round voyages on the same service. 1893 sold to Aberdeen Atlantic Line and sailed from Danzig on 23rd Dec.1896 for Halifax, but went missing with the loss of 32 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.866]

STATE OF INDIANA / ISMIR 1874
2,528 gross tons, length 329.9ft x beam 36.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 75-1st, 30-2nd and 550-3rd class passengers. Built by T. Wingate & Co, Glasgow, she was launched on 27th Aug.1874 for the State Steamship Co, Glasgow and sailed from Glasgow for Larne and New York on 6th Sep.1874. She continued NY sailings until 23rd Jan.1891 when she started her last voyage for this company between Glasgow, Moville and New York. The company went into liquidation in 1890 and the STATE OF INDIANA was sold to the Allan Line who used her for one further round voyage to New York and in 1893 sold her to Turkey. Renamed ISMIR, she was eventually sunk by the Turks as a blockship at Smyrna (Izmir). [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.2 by N.R.P. Bonsor]

The new screw steam-ship, State of Indiana, was built by Messrs. Thomas Wingate and Co., at Whiteinch, Glasgow, for the State Line Steam-Ship Company, to be employed in the trade between Glasgow and New York. This ship is a magnificent specimen of marine architecture. She was launched with all her machinery on board, and completely fitted for sea on Aug. 27th, 1874. The ladies' cabin opens off the saloon and is very tastefully furnished in blue velvet, with decorations of white enamel and gold. There is also a large, circular boudoir on deck for the exclusive use of the ladies, with large plate-glass windows, shaded with blue silk hangings and floored with encaustic tiles. From this apartment a private staircase leads to a promenade deck. There is a commodious smoking-room for gentlemen, with large windows and a tiled floor. Adjoining the saloon is the Chief Steward's pantry, which is of extra large size, with all convenient fittings. Electric wires are led from the saloons and staterooms to this apartment and it is in communication with the galley, above, by means of hoists. The state-rooms are entirely separate from the saloon. They are spacious, well- lit, ventilated and beautifully painted with white enamel and gold. Comfortable, well-arranged baths and other conveniences are in this part of the vessel. The second-class cabins are roomy apartments, comfortably furnished as parlour and bedroom The steerage accomodation is unsurpassed. Separate compartments are provided for single men, for married couples and families and for single women - cleanliness and good ventilation prevail throughout; and, in cold weather, the entire ship is heated by steam. The Captain's apartments, and also those of the officers of the ship, are amidships. The forecastle presents a special feature, being semi-circular, with twelve doors leading to staircases to the 'tween decks, the quarters of the sailors and firemen. It also forms a shelter in bad weather. Immediately over the Captain's and officers' rooms are the bridges and chart-house, from which telegraphic communication is arranged with the engine department and wheel-house, controlling all the movements of the ship. Besides the usual donkey-engines and steam-winches there are independent steam-engines for steering, assisting ashes, or working the anchors, so as a to reduce manual labour. There are numerous life-boats raised on platforms to allow passengers to walk under them, and fitted with the approved patent lowering apparatus. On the whole, nothing appears, to have been left undone to make the vessel complete in every respect. The State of Indiana is the fourth vessel Messrs. Thomas Wingate and Co., have built for the “State Line" which now consists of nine ships, the others having been built by the London and Glasgow Engineering and Ship-Building Company of Glasgow. Six of these vessels are similar in size, power and style to the State of Indiana. These constitute the line to New York and sail regularly every Friday from Glasgow, calling at the railway wharf at Larne, near Belfast, on Saturday morning, to take on board goods and passengers. These ships sail on the return voyage from New York every Saturday ; they call at Larne to land passengers for Ireland and those who wish to avail themselves of the most expeditious route to England without going on to Glasgow. The other three vessels belonging to the company are employed in maintaining a monthly communication between Liverpool and New Orleans. ['The Illustrated London News', October 17th, 1874-posted by Tony Dalton]

STATE OF NEVADA / MEKKE 1874
The STATE OF NEVADA was built by the London & Glasgow Co in 1874 for the British owned State Line. She was a 2,488 gross ton ship, length 332.1ft x beam 36.3ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 75-1st, 30-intermediate and 550-3rd class. Launched on 2nd Jun.1874, she sailed from Glasgow on 19th Jul.1874 on her maiden voyage to Larne and New York. She started her fifth and last voyage on this route on 19th Dec.1874 and was then chartered to the Red Star Line and commenced the first of seven Antwerp - New York sailings on 27th Feb.1875, the last starting 11th Dec.1875. On 2nd Jun.1876 she resumed Glasgow - Larne - New York voyages and commenced her last Glasgow - Moville - New York voyage 20th Mar.1891. Sold to the Allan Line she made nine round voyages between Glasgow, Moville and New York between 25th Apr.1891 and 2nd Sep.1892. She was sold to Turkish owners in 1893, renamed MEKKE and was reported as a war loss between 1914-1918.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.866]

STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA / PENNSYLVANIA / MEDINA / MARMARA 1873
The "State of Pennsylvania" was built by the London & Glasgow Co., Glasgow as the "Pennsylvania" for the State Steamship Co.,Ltd. She was a 2,472 gross ton ship, length 331.5ft x beam 36.3ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 65-1st, 35-intermediate and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 12/2/1873, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Larne(Ireland) and New York on 18/4/1873. In December 1873 she was renamed "State of Pennsylvania" to avoid confusion with other ships and commenced her first voyage Glasgow - Larne - New York under this name on 19/12/1873. On 27/3/1891 she commenced her last voyage Glasgow - Moville - New York, and then went to the Allan Line, but did not run for them. In 1893 she went to a Turkish company and was renamed "Medina" and in 1900 was resold and renamed "Marmara" (Turkish). On 5/9/1915 she was reported sunk by Russian destroyers off Kefken. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.865]

STATENDAM 1898 / SCOTIAN 1910 / MARGLEN 1922
The STATENDAM was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1898 for the Holland America Line. She was a 10,491 gross ton ship, length 515.3ft x beam 59.8ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. Accommodation was provided for 200-1st, 175-2nd and 2,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 7th May 1898, she sailed from Rotterdam on her maiden voyage to New York on 24th August 1898. She stayed on this service until her last voyage commenced on 22nd January 1910, after which she was sold to the Allan Line and renamed SCOTIAN. Refitted to 10,322 gross tons and with accommodation for 550-2nd and 1,150-3rd class passengers, she commenced sailing between Glasgow, Halifax and Portland in March 1911. She started her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 6th May 1911, her first Glasgow - Boston voyage on 18th November 1911, and her first London - Quebec - Montreal voyage on 9th May 1912. In January 1914 she was chartered to Canadian Pacific and completed a single round voyage between Liverpool and St John NB. Her last London - Quebec - Montreal sailing commenced on 21st August 1914 and on the homeward passage, she was used to transport part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force to the UK. Between Nov.1914 and March 1915 she was used as an accommodation ship for German prisoners at Ryde, Isle of Wight and in 1917 went to Canadian Pacific, who had taken over the Allan Line. Her first voyage for her new owners started on 4th September 1918 when she left Liverpool for New York and her first Liverpool - St John NB sailing commenced 3rd January 1919. Later the same year her accommodation was altered to carry 304-cabin, and 542-3rd class passengers and on 12th November 1919 she commenced sailings between Antwerp, Southampton, Quebec and Montreal. She resumed the London - Quebec - Montreal service on 16th May 1920 and between 1920-1921 made four trooping voyages to Bombay for the British government. She was renamed MARGLEN for Canadian Pacific on 16th November 1922 and on 15th May 1923 commenced her last North Atlantic voyage between London, Havre, Southampton, Quebec and Montreal. Between 1923 and 1926 she completed 15 round voyages to Bombay and on 30th December 1926 was sold to D.L.Pittaluga of Genoa and was scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3, p.912 / vol.1, p.324]

STAVANGERFJORD 1917
The STAVANGERFJORD was a well known vessel belonging to the Norwegian American Line. Built be Cammel Laird & Co, Birkenhead in 1917, she was a 12,977 gross ton vessel, length overall 553ft x beam 64.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. Accommodation for 88-1st, 318-2nd, and 820-3rd class passengers. Launched on 21st May 1917, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Birkenhead on 29th April 1918 to New York, where she was laid up. On 11th September 1918 she sailed from New York to Christiania [Oslo] and in October made her first run from Christiania to Christiansand, Stavanger, Bergen and New York. In 1924, she was converted to fuel oil and her accommodation altered to carry cabin class and 3rd class passengers. In 1930 she was rebuilt again to carry 147 cabin class, 207 tourist class and 820-3rd class passengers. In 1938 she was modernised and on 9th December 1939 commenced her last voyage from New York to Bergen and Oslo where she was laid up. In 1940 after the German invasion of Norway, she was used as a depot ship and in 1945 was used as a troopship between Norway and New York. In 1946 she was refitted to carry 122-1st, 222-cabin and 335- tourist class and on 31st May 1946 resumed the Oslo - Bergen - New York service. On 9th December 1953 her rudder carried away in mid-Atlantic and she was escorted to Oslo. In 1956, she was refitted and her tonnage increased to 14,015 gross tons and accommodation altered to carry 66-1st, 184-cabin and 402-tourist class passengers. On 18th November 1963 she left Oslo on her last voyage to Copenhagen, Stavanger, New York, Bergen and Oslo. Scrapped in 1964 at Hong Kong. There is a photograph of her in North Atlantic Seaway Vol.4, p. 1436 by N.R.P.Bonsor.

STEFAN BATORY 1969 see MAASDAM 1952

STEINHOFT / CANADIA / REVAL / MYRTOON / GYPTIS / VILLE DE NANCY 1889 The STEINHOFT was a 2,404 gross ton ship, length 301.4ft x beam 37.8ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 10-1st and 620-3rd class passengers. Built by Reiherstieg, Hamburg, she was launched for the Hansa Line on 16th Mar.1889. Her maiden voyage started on 12th May 1889 when she left Hamburg for Quebec and Montreal and in March 1892 she was purchased by Hamburg America Line. She transferred to Hamburg - New York sailings on 30th Jun.1892 and in 1894 was renamed CANADIA. On 7th Nov.1894 she started the first of four Hamburg - Baltimore sailings, on 25th May 1895 started the first of four Hamburg - Montreal sailings and on 11th Jun.1899 started the first of four Stettin - New York voyages. Her last voyage was from Hamburg to Boston on 25th Jan.1900 and in 1905 she was  sold to Russia and renamed REVAL. Returned to Hamburg America Line the same year, she reverted to her previous name and in 1906 was sold to Furness Line. Sold to the Anglo-Hellenic SS Co, Greece in 1910 and renamed MYRTOON and in 1914 she went to J. Castanie, Oran and was named GYPTIS. Again sold in 1919 to Havre owners, she was renamed VILLE DE NANCY and was scrapped in Italy in 1924. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.399][Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

STEINMANN / ALEXANDRE SMYERS 1872
1,263 gross tons, length 223.3ft x beam 29.6ft, iron hull, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Built by Wigham Richardson & Co, Walker-on-Tyne (engines by Thompson, Boyd & Co, Newcastle), she was launched in 1872 for the White Cross Line of Antwerp. Her maiden voyage between Antwerp and New York started on 12th Oct.1872 and she continued on this service until commencing her last sailing on 8th Feb.1877. In 1877 she was transferred to A. Smyers, Antwerp in exchange for another ship and was renamed ALEXANDRE SMYERS. She foundered off Hantsholm, Skaggerak on 18th Oct.1881.

STELLA 1871
1,515 gross tons, length 253ft x beam 33ft, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots. Built by Van Vlissingen & Co, Amsterdam and launched for Royal Netherlands SS Co in 1871. She made a single round voyage between Genoa, Leghorn and New York in Sep.1880 and on 24th Mar.1881 started her first Amsterdam - New York sailing. Her 13th and last voyage on this route started 3rd Jan.1883 and she was then transferred to other services. Scrapped in 1908. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3]

STIEGERWALD / SANTA FE / ST. ANDRE 1921
built 1921 for HAPAG for the South America service. Delivered on 29th Jul.1921 she was 4,627 gross tons, 126.2m x 15.4m, speed 12 knots. 1937 chartered to Hamburg Sud and 1936 purchased by them. 1937 renamed SANTA FE, 1939 Captured by French destroyers off Cape Verde and renamed ST. ANDRE. 1940 returned to Hamburg Sud after the surrender of France and reverted to SANTA FE and employed as a troopship in the Mediterranean. 23.11.1943 torpedoed and sunk by Russian submarine in the Black Sea.

STIRLING CASTLE 1935
The STIRLING CASTLE was built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in 1935 for Union Castle Line. She was a 25,554 gross ton vessel, length 725ft, one funnel, two masts and a speed of 20 knots. There was accommodation for 300-1st and 500-cabin class passengers. Launched on 15th July 1935, she commenced her maiden voyage from Southampton to Capetown on 7th February 1936. She made a record voyage from Southampton to Capetown of 13 days 9 hours later the same year, which beat the previous record held since 1893 by the Union Line's SCOT. From 1940 she served as a troopship, steaming 505,000 miles and carrying a total of 128,000 personnel. From 1943 she sailed in the trooping service from the USA and on one voyage carried over 6,000 men. She returned to the mail service in 1947 after reconditioning, with accommodation for 243-1st and 540-tourist class passengers. She continued on the Cape run until her last voyage in 1965 when she arrived at Southampton on 30th November. She carried out cruises for a few weeks and finally left Southampton on 1st February 1966 for Mihara, Japan where she arrived on 3rd March for breaking up.[The Cape Run by W.H.Mitchell & L.A. Sawyer]

STOCKHOLM 1915 see POTSDAM 1899

STOCKHOLM 1948
11,700 gross tons, length 510.4ft x beam 69.1ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 19 knots, accommodation for 113-1st and 282-tourist class passengers.
Built by Gotaverken, Gothenburg, she was launched on 9th Sep.1946 for the Swedish American Line and started her maiden voyage from Gothenburg to New York on 21st Feb.1948. 1952 rebuilt to 12,644 gross tons with accommodation for 86-1st and 584-tourist class passengers. 1955 First class accommodation reduced to 20. 25th Jul.1956 collided with and sank the Italian liner ANDREA DORIA off New York, repaired at New York and resumed New York - Gothenburg service on 8th Dec.1956. On 9th Jan.1958 she started her first Copenhagen - Gothenburg - Bremen - Halifax - New York voyage and on 4th Dec.1959 made her last New York - Halifax - Copenhagen - Gothenburg crossing. Sold to East Germany on 1st Jan. 1960 renamed VOLKERFREUNDSCHAFT and used for cruising.1986 sold and registered in Panama, renamed VOLKER and used as a barracks ship at Oslo. In the 1990s she was sold to Italy, rebuilt as a cruise ship and renamed ITALIA PRIMA for Nina Cruises. 1999 chartered to Club Valtur and renamed VALTUR PRIMA. 2001 laid up at Havana. 2002 returned to Nina Cruises renamed CARIBE. 2004 sold to Classic Cruises renamed ATHENA. 2005 still in service.

STRASSBURG 1872
3,025 gross tons, length 350ft x beam 39ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st, 120-2nd and 900-3rd class passengers. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock, she was launched for North German Lloyd, Bremen on 24th May 1872 for the New Orleans service. Her maiden voyage started 3rd Sep.1872 when she left Bremen for Southampton and New York and on 16th Oct.1872 she started her first Bremen - Havre - New Orleans sailing. Her first Bremen - Baltimore voyage started 16th Feb.1881 and her last sailing on this service commenced 19th Sep.1883. Between 1883 - 1896 she sailed mostly to South America. On 2nd Aug.1893 she started her twelfth and last Bremen - New York sailing and on 25th Jan.1896 commenced her final sailing between Bremen and South America. Sold in 1896, she was scrapped the following year at Genoa.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.548]

STRATHAIRD 1931
The STRATHAIRD was built by Vickers-Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness in 1931 for Peninsular & Oriental Stem Nav. Co (P&O Line). She was a 22,544 gross ton ship, length 638.7ft x beam80.2ft, three funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 21 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 500-1st and 670-tourist class. Her maiden voyage started on 12th Feb.1932 when she left London for Bombay, Colombo and Australian ports. Between 1939-1945 she served as a troopship and carried a total of 128,961 personnel. Reconditioned in 1946-7 and with two of her funnels removed, she resumed the London - India - Australia service in Jan.1948. In 1954 she was refitted to carry 1,200 single class passengers, and her calls at Bombay were then discontinued. She commenced her last voyage to Australia on 28th Mar.1961 and was then sold to Shun Fung Ironworks, Hong Kong and scrapped.   [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O, Orient & Blue Anchor Lines][North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

STRATHALLAN 1938
The STRATHALLAN was a 23,722 gross ton ship, length 664.5ft x beam 82.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 20 knots. There was accommodation for 530-1st and 450-tourist class passengers. Built, together with her sister ship STRATHEDEN, by Vickers-Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness, she was launched for P&O Line on 23rd Sep.1937. On 18th Mar.1938 she started her maiden voyage to Australia and in 1939 was requisitioned for use as a troopship. On 12th Dec.1942 she left the Clyde en route for Oran with 4,000 British and American troops and 250 nurses. At 2.25am on 21st Dec. she was torpedoed by the German submarine U.562 off Oran. Four were killed in the explosion and the ship's own lifeboats took off all the nurses and 1,000 troops. She was taken in tow, but the list continued to increase and the remaining troops were taken off. The fire aboard had now reached the ammunition store so the crew were evacuated and the ship rolled over and sank in the afternoon, only 19 miles short of her destination.[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O, Orient and Blue Anchor Lines][Troop Ships and their History by Colonel H.C.B.Rogers] [British Vessels Lost at Sea 1939-45, HMSO]

STRATHEDEN / MARIANNA LATSIS / HENRIETTA LATSIS 1937
23,732 gross tons, length 664.5ft x beam 82.1ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 20 knots. Accommodation for 530-1st and 450-tourist class passengers. Built in 1937 by Vickers-Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness, she was launched on 10th June for the P&O Line, and her maiden voyage to Australia started on 24th Dec. Between 1939-1945 she served as a troopship, was reconditioned 1946-47 and resumed her P&O Line service in June 1947.  Sold to John S. Latsis, Piraeus in 1964, she was renamed HENRIETTA LATSIS, and in 1966 was renamed MARIANNA LATSIS. Scrapped at Spezia in 1969. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O Line]

STRATHMORE / HENRIETTA LATSIS / MARIANNA LATSIS 1935
STRATHMORE was built by Vickers-Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness for the P&O Line. She was a 23,580 gross ton ship, length 665ft x beam 82ft (202,69m x 25,04m), one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 20 knots. Accommodation for 525-1st and 500-tourist class passengers. Launched on 4th Apr.1935, her maiden voyage in Oct. was a cruise. In Nov.1935 she started London - Australia voyages and between 1939-1945 served as a troopship. Reconditioned between 1948-49, she resumed service between London, Bombay and Sydney on 27th Oct.1949. In 1961 she was converted to a one-class ship with accommodation for 1,250 passengers and the call at Bombay was omitted. On 20th June 1963 she commenced her last London - Australia sailing and was then sold to John S. Latsis, Piraeus and renamed MARIANNA LATSIS. Used on the Mecca pilgrimage service from Karachi, she was renamed HENRIETTA LATSIS in 1966 and was scrapped at Spezia in 1969.[Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P&O Line]

STRATHNAVER 1931
The STRATHNAVER was a 22,270 gross ton ship, length 638.6ft x beam 80.2ft (194,64m x 24,43m), three funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 21 knots. There was accommodation for 500-1st and 670-tourist class passengers. Built by Vickers-Armstrong, Barrow-in-Furness, she was launched for the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co (P & O Line) on 5th Feb.1931. Her maiden voyage started on 2nd Oct.1931 when she left London for Bombay, Colombo, Melbourne and Sydney and she continued on this service until requisitioned as a troopship in 1939. Used for transporting ANZAC troops to Suez, and later at the troop landings at Oran and Algiers in 1942. In May and June 1943 she was stationed in the Red Sea and used as a training ship for the Italian landings and in 1944 took part in the Anzio landing. After the war she was used for the repatriation of troops and in 1948-9 was reconditioned at Belfast, where her two dummy funnels were removed. She resumed the London - Australia service on 5th Jan.1950, and in 1954 was refitted to carry 1,252 single class passengers. The same year the Bombay call was omitted from her schedule. Her last voyage to Australia started on 7th Dec.1961 and in April 1962 she was sold to Shun Fung Ironworks, Hong Kong for breaking up. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.1, P & O, Orient and Blue Anchor Lines]

STUBBENHUK / SICILIA / KOMAGATA MARU / HEIAN MARU 1890
2,922 gross tons, length 329ft x beam 41.5ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Accommodation for 10-1st and 620-3rd class passengers. Built by C. Connell & Co, Glasgow (engines by D. Rowan & Son, Glasgow), she was launched for the Hansa Line on 13th Aug.1890 as the STUBBENHUK. Her maiden voyage started on 19th Oct.1890 when she left Hamburg for Quebec and Montreal and she was purchased by Hamburg America Line in March 1892. On 21st Apr.1892 she started her first Hamburg - Antwerp - Montreal voyage and in 1894 was renamed SICILIA. Her first Hamburg - Boston sailing started on 22nd Dec.1894, her first Stettin - Helsingborg - Gothenburg - New York on 8th May 1895, and the first of four Hamburg - Montreal sailings on 9th May 1896. On 9th Dec.1897 she commenced her last Stettin - New York sailing and on 13th Mar.1901 commenced Genoa - Naples - New York voyages. Her last Genoa - NY voyage started on 2nd Feb.1902 and in Apr.1902 she commenced the first of nine sailings between Odessa - Constantinople - Piraeus - New York. Sold to Japan in 1913, she was renamed KOMAGATA MARU and in 1925 became the HEIAN MARU. She was wrecked on 11th Feb.1926 near Cape Soidomai, Japan. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.398]

STURA 1883
The STURA was a 2,245 gross ton ship, length 299.2ft x beam 37.2ft, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 20-1st and 500-3rd class passengers. Built by Blackwood & Gordon, Port Glasgow, she was launched in Sep.1883 for Raggio, Genoa. She sailed between the Clyde or Cardiff and Italy with coal cargos, and also made one Cardiff - Bombay voyage before starting her first Genoa - Montevideo - Buenos Aires sailing on 16th Dec.1884. The company and fleet were taken over by Navigazione Generale Italiana in 1885 and the STURA commenced her first Messina - Palermo - New York sailing on 22nd May 1885. On 3rd Nov.1892 she started her fourteenth and last Italy - New York voyage when she left Genoa for Palermo, Messina and New York. Sold to Soc. Nazionale di Servizi Marittimi in 1910 and in 1913 she went to Sicilia. On 17th May 1916 she was torpedoed and sunk by an enemy submarine off Brindisi with the loss of six lives.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1112] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, p.258]

STUTTGART 1889
The STUTTGART was built by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1889 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North Germen Lloyd]. This was a 5,048 gross ton ship, length 415ft x beam 48ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Accommodation was provided for 44-1st, 36-2nd and 1,955-3rd class passengers. Launched on 26/10/1889, she left Bremen on her maiden voyage to Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 10/1/1890. On 28/8/1890 she commenced her first Bremen - Baltimore voyage and on 11/1/1891 her first Bremen - New York voyage. Her first Bremen - Australia via Suez voyage commenced on 1/7/1896. Her last North Atlantic voyage started on 3/12/1899 when she left Bremen for New York having made a total of 35 round voyages on the N.Atlantic service. On 16/5/1900 she started her first Bremen - Far East run and on 7/4/1903 made her last of 8 round voyages. On 13/7/1904 she started her last Bremen - Australia sailing (9 round voyages) and on 12/1/1907 resumed Bremen - South America sailings. Her final voyage commenced on this service on 14/12/1907 and she was scrapped the following year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.554]

STUTTGART 1923
The STUTTGART was built by Vulcan Werke, Stettin in 1923 for North German Lloyd of Bremen, this was a 13,367 gross ton ship, length 537ft x beam 65ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 171-1st, 338-2nd and 594-3rd class. Launched on 31/7/1923, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 15/1/1924. In November 1927, she was refitted to carry cabin class, tourist third cabin and 3rd class passengers. She made her last Bremen - New York (dep. 26/9/1937)- Bremen voyage in September 1937. In 1938 she was sold to the German Labour Front and was used for "Strength through Joy" cruising with accommodation for 990-single class passengers. Converted to a German Naval Hospital Ship in 1939, she was bombed in Gdynia on 9th October 1943 while filled with wounded German soldiers. She was towed to the outer harbour and deliberately sunk with considerable loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.572] [German Ocean Liners of the 20th Century by William H.Miller, p.111]

STUYVESANT 1918
The STUYVESANT was a 4,285 gross ton passenger / cargo steamer, 342ft x 47.6ft, speed 12½ knots. Built 1918 by Nederland. Scheepsbouw Mij., Amsterdam for Konink. West-Indische Maildienst, Amsterdam. 1927 owned by N.V. Konink. Nederland Stoomboot Mij, Amsterdam. In 1941 she became a Royal Netherlands Navy depot ship and was returned to her owners in 1945. 1950 sold to Cia. Nav. del Atlantico, Panama [managed by Hellenic Mediterranean Lines, Piraeus] renamed AEOLIA. 1955 owners became Hellenic Mediterranean Lines, Piraeus. 1960 scrapped at Hiroshima.

SUD AMERICA 1872
2,246 gross tons, length 314ft x beam 35.3ft (95.70m x 10.76m), one funnel, four masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 75-1st, 52-2nd and 750-3rd class passengers. Built by Wigham Richardson & Co, Walker-on-Tyne, UK, she was launched for Lavarello on 12th June 1872 and sailed on her maiden voyage from Genoa to South America. In 1883 she came under the ownership of M. Bruzzo & Co and in 1884 became owned by La Veloce (La Veloce Linea di Navigazione Italiana a Vapore). She continued South America sailings until 13th Sep.1898 when she was sunk in collision with the S.G.T.M.Line collier FRANCE at Las Palmas with the loss of 87 lives. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

SUD AMERICANO / SCHLESWIG / YAKIMA STAR / WESER / VANCOUVER ISLAND 1928
The VANCOUVER ISLAND was a 7,000 gross ton twin screw motorship built by the Deutsche Werke, Kiel in 1928 as the SUD AMERICANO for the Norwegian A/S Linea Sud Americano (Ivar Christensen). Due to her not reaching her contracted speed, she (together with her sister ship SUD EXPRESO) was returned to her builders, renamed SCHLESWIG and laid up. For a time she was under charter to the Blue Star Line of London and was renamed YAKIMA STAR. About 1933 she was purchased by an intermediary concern, re-engined, and had her hull lengthened, bringing her gross tonnage up to 9,200. Her two funnels were replaced by a single one, and she entered the service of Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd] of Bremen. She was then renamed WESER. In October 1940 she was captured while attempting to run the British blockade by HMCS PRINCE ROBERT, which was formerly the Canadian National Steamship coastal liner of the same name. The WESER was renamed VANCOUVER ISLAND and as such, was torpedoed by a German submarine in the North Atlantic on October 15th 1941. [Keith B.Lewis, Sea Breezes magazine, Dec.1950]

SUEVIA / QUATRE AMIS 1874
The SUEVIA was a 3,609 gross ton ship, length 360.3ft x beam 41ft, one funnel, two masts(rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st, 70-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock, she was launched for the Hamburg America Line on 1st Jun.1874. Her maiden voyage started on 21st Oct.1874 when she left Hamburg for Havre and New York. On 11th Apr.1894 she started her first Naples - New York voyage and commenced her last Hamburg - New York sailing on 27th Oct.1894. Her sixth and last Naples - New York sailing started on 10th Apr.1895 and in 1896 she was sold to French owners and renamed QUATRE AMIS. In 1898 she stranded in the River Scheldt, was refloated and scrapped at Marseilles.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.391]

SUEVIC / SKYTTEREN 1900
The SUEVIC was a 12,531 gross ton ship, built in 1900 for the White Star Line by Harland & Wolff, Belfast. Her details were - length 565ft x beam 63.3ft (172.2m x 19.3m), one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 14 knots. There was capacity for 400-cabin class passengers. Launched on Dec.8th 1900, she started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Cape Town, Albany, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney on 23rd Mar.1901. On 17th Mar.1907 she stranded on the Stag Rock near Lizard Point, Cornwall and broke in two . The after section was salvaged and a new bow section built, and joined at Southampton. She re-entered service in Jan.1908 and in 1914 became a troop transport. On 7th Feb.1920 she resumed the London - Sydney - Melbourne service, was refitted in 1921 to carry 226-2nd class passengers and started her final London - Australia voyage on 14th Apr.1928. In Oct.1928 she was sold to Y.Hvistendahl, Tonsberg, rebuilt as a whale factory ship at Kiel and renamed SKYTTEREN. In 1940 she was interned at Gothenburg, attempted to break out to England and was surprised by the German Navy on 1st Apr.1942. She was scuttled by her crew off Maseskjaer, Sweden to avoid capture.[Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.1][North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

SUFFOLK 1902
7,573 gross ton steamship, built in 1902 by John Brown & Co, Clydebank for the Federal Steam Navigation Co. She had accommodation for 24-1st and 200-3rd class passengers, was a twin screw ship with a speed of 13 knots. Federal Line ran a combined service with Houlder Brothers, initially under contract to the New Zealand Government between UK - South Africa - Australia and New Zealand. The SUFFOLK was the first Federal Line ship to be used on this service when she left Liverpool on 15th Oct.1904 for Las Palmas - Capetown - Adelaide - Melbourne - Sydney - Auckland - Wellington - Lyttelton and Port Chalmers. In 1912 the company came under the control of the New Zealand Shipping Co, which in turn came under the control of P&O Line in 1916. The SUFFOLK was sold in 1927 for scrapping. [North Star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

SULLAMUT / QUEEN OF INDIA / NESTOR / TERESA / ASSUNZIONE 1889
The NESTOR was a 3767 gross ton ship, length 370.5ft x beam 42.2ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Built by Schlesinger, Davies & Co, Newcastle in 1889 as the SULLAMUT for Hajee Jasoob Poorbhoy, Bombay, she later became the QUEEN OF INDIA  owned by Beyts, Craig & Co. In 1894 she was acquired by Ocean SS Co (Blue Funnel Line) and was refurbished and renamed NESTOR. Sold to Italy in 1911 and renamed TERESA and later ASSUNZIONE. Torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean on 15th June 1917.

SUMATRA 1867
O.N.56844. 2,488 gross tons, length 318.3ft x beam 38.3ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 180-1st and 60-2nd class passengers. Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Dumbarton (Yard No.123) for the Peninsular & Oriental S.N. Co., she was commissioned on 13th Sep.1867 for general Far East services. 1874 compound inverted engine installed by the builders. 7th May 1886 sold to Hajee Cassum Joosub, Bombay for the Mecca Pilgrimage trade. Nov.1888 sold to James R. Brady, Belfast. 4th Mar.1889 destroyed by fire at sea in the Eastern Mediterranean in position 32.00N 31.15E while on voyage Batoum to Hong Kong with a cargo of cased petroleum.

SURREY / MICHIGAN / HARRY LUCKENBACH 1881  
2,949 gross tons, length 300ft x beam 40.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots. Launched on 16th Apr.1881 by W. Gray & Co., West Hartlepool (engines built by Blair & Co, Stockton) for the Atlantic Transport Line, London. She started her maiden voyage on 14th Aug.1881 when she left Barrow for New York with a cargo of iron ore and made two voyages on this service. She was then fitted with accommodation for over 1,200 steerage passengers and chartered to the Royal Netherlands SS Co. (KNSM). She sailed Amsterdam - New York on 2nd Apr.1882 with 1,258 passengers and made seven voyages on this route, the last commencing on 24th Jan.1883. She then returned to the Atlantic Transport Line and in 1888 was renamed MICHIGAN and was sold in 1889 to other British owners. In 1893 she was resold to Norwegian owners and in 1900 came under the ownership of the American Luckenbach Lines and renamed HARRY LUCKENBACH. On 6th Jan.1918 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.84 in the Bay of Biscay. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3 by N.R.P. Bonsor]

SURREY / BRODFIELD 1899
5,455 gross tons, length 420ft x beam 54ft, one funnel, four masts, single screw, speed 11 knots, accommodation for 12-1st and 150-3rd class passengers. Built 1899 by Hawthorn, Leslie & Co., Hebburn-on-Tyne for the Federal Steam Navigation Co., she was used on the normal Federal Line route from the UK to Fremantle, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Wellington, Lyttelton and Port Chalmers, usually via Las Palmas and the Cape. In 1901 she was used as a Boer War transport from New Zealand and on 25th Feb.1915 was mined between Dunkirk and Calais, but was towed to Dover. After repairs, she was sold to Blue Star Line and renamed BRODFIELD. 13th Nov.1916 wrecked near Church Point, Scilly Isles.[Merchant Fleets, vol.7 by Duncan Haws] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M. Maber]

SURREY 1919
O.N.143352, 9,783 gross tons, length 460.4ft x beam 62.8ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 14 knots. Completed July 1919 by Palmers' Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd, Newcastle (Yard No.868) for Federal Steam Navigation Co., London. Fitted with telescopic masts for use in the Manchester Ship Canal. Used on the UK - Australia - New Zealand service. She was bombed and damaged early in the war while discharging cargo in Royal Albert Dock, London and on 22nd Dec.1941 was damaged in collision off Avonmouth and put into Milford Haven for repairs. 8th Jan.1942 she lost her rudder in the North Atlantic in hurricane force winds and used a jury rudder, engines and sails to cover 2,200 miles before HMS CAVINA (Elders & Fyffes), took her in tow on 26th Jan. On 28th the tow was taken over by a Dutch salvage tug and she reached Bermuda 2 days later. She left Bermuda on 10th Feb. in tow for Hampton Roads, but due to bad weather, had to be cast adrift for 3 days before being re-secured.. On 10th June 1942 she was twice torpedoed by U.68 (Merten), 150 miles North of Cristobal in position 12.45N 80.20W (the second blowing off her stern), while sailing independently on a voyage from New York and Hampton Roads to Sydney, NSW via Panama with general cargo including ammunition, tanks, guns and machinery. Four lifeboats got clear before the ship exploded. The Master, Capt. F. Lougheed and 34 survivors were rescued by the Columbian schooner RESOLUTE after being adrift for 3 days and transferred to the USS EDISON. 20 survivors were rescued by the Dutch ship FLORA and the Panamanian ship POTOMAC and landed at Colon. 10 crew and 2 gunners were lost in the stern section.

SUTLEJ 1908
O.N.125702 3,549 gross tons, length 349.1ft x beam 44.2ft, single screw, speed 12 knots. Built 1908 by Charles Connell & Co, Glasgow (Yard No.321) for James Nourse & Co., London. Nourse Line was heavily involved in the trade of carrying railway iron or salt from Europe to Calcutta, From there a cargo of rice and a party of coolies were taken to the West Indies, followed by a passage, usually in ballast to the East Coast of North America. There grain or case oil would be loaded for Europe. The SUTLEJ was requisitioned Sep.- Dec.1914 as an Indian Expeditionary Force Transport, Nov.-Dec.1915 East African E.F. Transport, Dec.1915 - Jan.1916 Indian E.F. Transport, Apr. - Jun.1916 Expeditionary Force Transport, Jun. - Jul. 1916 requisitioned to carry coal, Mar.1917 - Mar.1918 requisitioned to carry successively sugar, coal, wheat and coal, 30th Apr.1917 rescued 20 survivors from the torpedoed steamer DELAMERE off Ireland and later the same day was missed by a torpedo. Mar.-Jun.1918 requisitioned as an Expeditionary Force Transport, Jun.-Jul.1918 requisitioned to carry coal. Jul.1918 - May 1919 taken over under the Liner Requisition Scheme. 21st Dec.1919 grounded on Juan de Nova Island while bound Demarara - Calcutta but refloated. 1929 sold to Sun Shipping Co. (Mitchell, Cotts & Co.), London renamed CAPE ST. FRANCIS. 1932 sold to T. G. Paterson, London, 1933 sold to Peters & Co., Hong Kong, 1936 sold to Shun Hong SS Co (Williamson & Co), Hong Kong, 1942 requisitioned for the Liner Division, managed by British India S.N. Co., 1942-1944 classified as a Miscellaneous Naval Vessel, then a coal hulk until laid up in Nov.1946. May 1947 sold for scrapping at Bombay. [Nourse Line by Perry & Laxon contains photo of the ship]

SUVERIC / LAHNSTEIN 1906
6235 gross tons, built 1906 by Russell & Co, Glasgow for Andrew Weir & Co (Bank Line). She remained in the fleet until 1929 when she was sold to German owners and renamed LAHNSTEIN. Scrapped in 1933. This company ran regular services to the Pacific Islands and is still operating. You can find a website on the company and their ships at http://fp.redduster.f9.co.uk/AWEIR.htm

SWEDEN 1869
The SWEDEN was built by Barclay, Curle & Co, Glasgow (engines by G.Clark, Sunderland) in 1869 for the Allan Line's Scandinavian feeder service to Newcastle, from where train services ran to Liverpool and Glasgow. She was a 908 gross ton ship, length 190.4ft x beam 27.7ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 30th Mar.1869, she sailed between Newcastle and Norway.  The following year she was transferred, sailing between Leith and Christiania(Oslo), and Leith and Gothenburg in alternate weeks. These feeder services were withdrawn at the end of the 1870 season and on 20th Sept.1870 she commenced her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage. Her second voyage on this route commenced 11th Jun.1872 and her fifth and last on 19th Oct.1872. On 20th Oct.1893 she was wrecked near Vaasa, Finland. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1, pps.285,313]

SWITZERLAND / SANSONE 1874
The SWITZERLAND was a 2,816 gross ton ship, built by Palmers Shipbuilding & Iron Co, Jarrow-on-Tyne in 1874 for the Red Star Line of Antwerp. Her details were - length 329.4ft x beam 38.6ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 70-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 17/1/1874, she left Antwerp on her maiden voyage to New York on 24/4/1874. In October 1878 she made her first voyage from Antwerp to Philadelphia. Between 1878 and 1884 she sailed between Antwerp and New York or Philadelphia, and between 1884 and 1904 sailed from Antwerp to Philadelphia, except for one New York voyage in each of 1884, 1886, 1888 and 1901. In 1897 she was refitted to carry 3rd class only and on 26/10/1904 commenced her last voyage from Philadelphia to Antwerp. In 1905 she was sold to Italian owners and renamed SANSONE and was scrapped in Italy in 1909. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.851]

SYDNEY / MELUSIA 1902
1,989 gross tons, length 280.2ft x beam 38.2ft, passenger / cargo ship, single screw, speed 10 knots. Completed in Apr.1902 as the SYDNEY by Caledon SB & Eng. Co., Dundee for Melbourne SS Co., Melbourne. 1917 sold to Burns, Philp & Co., Sydney. 1918 renamed MELUSIA (same owners). 1927 sold to China Pacific S.N. Co, Shanghai renamed SHUN TSZE. 1931 sold to Lai Hing SS Co, Hong Kong renamed SHUN CHIH. 1933 owned by Sing Hing SS Co, Hong Kong. 25.12.1941 scuttled at Hong Kong to avoid capture by Japanese, refloated by Japanese salvors and back in service on 12th Apr.1944. Renamed SHUNCHO MARU (also listed as HARUSHIO MARU). 8th May 1945 mined and sunk at 34.06N 130.47E off Moji. [Register of Merchant Ships Completed in 1902 by Wm. A. Schell]

SYDNEY STAR / KENT 1936
12,696 gross tons, length 542.8ft x beam 710.4ft. one funnel, one mast, twin screw, speed 17 knots, refrigerated cargo space, accommodation for 12 passengers. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched for Frederick Leyland & Co (Blue Star Line managers) on 11th Jan.1936. Used on the UK - Australia / New Zealand service, she carried the prime minister of Queensland to the official opening of the outer harbour at Port Mackay in Aug.1939. On 24th July 1941 she was torpedoed off Pantellaria by E-Boats while taking part in a Malta convoy. Badly damaged, the 460 troops she was carrying were transferred to an escorting destroyer and she was left with a skeleton crew. She then beat off successive air attacks and arrived at Malta with an estimated two hours to spare before sinking, and with a 40ft hole in her side. She took four months to repair. In 1950 she came under the ownership of the Blue Star Line. Sold to Embajada Cia.Nav.S.A., in 1967, renamed KENT, she loaded at Rotterdam for her final voyage to the Far East. On 11th Aug. she arrived at Kaohsiang, Taiwan in tow from Hong Kong for scrapping. [Merchant Fleets, vol.14 by Duncan Haws]

SYLVANIA / FAIRWIND 1956
The SYLVANIA was built by John Brown & Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1956 for the Cunard Line. She was a 21,989 gross ton ship, length overall 608.3ft x beam 80.3ft, one funnel, one mast, twin screw and a speed of 21 knots. She was fitted with stabilisers and had accommodation for 154-1st and 714-tourist class passengers. Launched on 22nd Nov.1956, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Greenock to Quebec and Montreal on 5th Jun.1957. On 26th Jun.1957 she started her first Liverpool - Greenock - Quebec - Montreal voyage and on 28th Nov.1958 her first Liverpool - Cobh - Halifax - New York voyage. She made the last voyage of Cunard's service from Liverpool to Cobh and New York on 24th Nov.1966. Her last Southampton - Quebec - Montreal - Greenock - Liverpool sailing commenced on 20th Oct.1967 and her last regular passenger sailing was on 30th Nov.1967 when she left Liverpool for Halifax, New York, Halifax, Cobh, Havre and Southampton. She was subsequently used for cruising until making her last Cunard sailing on 24th Apr.1968 when she left Gibraltar for Southampton. Sold to Fairwind Shipping Corp, Monrovia she was renamed FAIRWIND and was intended for the Southampton - New Zealand service of the Sitmar Line but was laid up at Southampton. In 1970 she arrived at Trieste for conversion to a cruise liner and in 1977, after further rebuilding to 16,667 tons was used for cruising from US ports. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.172][Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vols 5 & 6]

S Descriptions SAA to SK | SL to SY

 Return to Index | Return to The Fleets

TheShipsList

TheShipsList®™ - (Swiggum) All Rights Reserved - Copyright © 1997-2014
These pages may be freely linked to but not duplicated in any fashion without written consent of .
Last updated: April 24, 2008 and maintained by and M. Kohli