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SHIP DESCRIPTIONS - T-U

Please note that ships often changed hands and names many times. If an entry is just the name of the vessel followed by a "see..." then that vessel was renamed and you will find the full history under the redirected name.

TABINTA 1930
Built by Nederlandsche Scheepsbouw Mij, Amsterdam (engines by Werkspoor, Amsterdam) in 1930 for the Nederland Line, this was a 8,156 gross ton ship, length 469ft x beam 62.2ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 15 knots. Launched on 21/3/1930, she was chartered to the Netherlands Government in 1948, who had established a line of emigrant ships to cope with the large scale level of emigration after the war. She made her first voyage from Rotterdam to Quebec in April 1948 and made a total of five round voyages to Quebec in 1948, plus four more in 1949. In July 1949 she made a single round voyage from Holland to New York. She was scrapped at Hong Kong in 1961 [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor,vol.4,p.1687]

TACOMA STAR 1919 see WAR THESEUS 1919

TAGUS 1868
The Mercantile Steamship Co of London (J.& C. Dunkerley) owned a TAGUS of 1912 gross tons, built in 1868. They owned a large fleet of tramp steamers which traded all over the world.

TAGUS / PRINCIPE DE VIANA 1899
5,545 gross tons, length 410ft x beam 30ft, two funnels, two masts, single screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 200-1st, 30-2nd and 250-3rd class passengers. Built by Robert Napier Sons & Co, Glasgow, she was launched for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co's Southampton - West Indies service on 27th Jun.1899. Her maiden voyage started 15th Nov.1899 and she continued on this route until 1914 with the exception of a period in 1900 when she was used as a Boer War troop transport. Between 1914 and 1918 she was used as a hospital ship and in 1920 was sold to Hijos de Jose Taya, Barcelona and renamed PRINCIPE DE VIANA. Scrapped in 1926.[Merchant Fleets, vol.5 by Duncan Haws] [Great Steamers White & Gold by R. Baker & A. Leonard]

TAHITI 1911 / PORT KINGSTON 1904
7585 gross tons, length 460ft x beam 55.5ft (140.21m x 16.92m), one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 17 knots. Built with accommodation for 160-1st and 60-2nd class passengers. Built by Alex Stephen & Sons, Glasgow, she was launched as the PORT KINGSTON on 19th Apr.1904 for Elder Dempster & Co's Imperial Direct West India Mail Service between Avonmouth, Bermuda and Kingston, Jamaica. Laid up in 1910 when the service ceased, she was sold to the Union SS Co of New Zealand in 1911, renamed TAHITI and fitted with accommodation for 277-1st, 97-2nd and 141-3rd class passengers. Used on the Sydney - Wellington - Raratonga - Tahiti - San Francisco service. Chartered to the New Zealand Government in 1914, she was converted to a troopship and trooped mainly to Marseilles and Gallipoli, with three voyages to the UK. In 1918 she trooped between the USA and Europe and then came under the control of the British Transport Service. Used in 1918 for the repatriation of troops to NZ and of British troops from India to the UK, she was then returned to her owners and refitted. She resumed the NZ - Vancouver service in 1920. On 15th Aug.1930, her propeller shaft snapped 400 miles off Raratonga and tore a large hole in her stern plates. Several ships came to her rescue and all passengers, crew, mails, bullion and baggage were saved before she sank two days later. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.20, Elder Dempster Lines]

TAINUI / CAVADONGA / ASTORIA 1884
The ASTORIA was built by Wm Denny & Bros, Dumbarton, Scotland in 1884 for Shaw Savill & Albion Line as the TAINUI. Her dimensions were 5086 gross tons, length 439.6ft x beam 46.4ft, clipper stem, two funnels, four masts (rigged for sail), single screw and a speed of 13 knots. Accommodation for 120-1st, 180-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Launched on 8th Sep.1884 she left London on her maiden voyage on 13th Jan.1885 for Hobart via the Cape of Good Hope and home via Cape Horn. Used on the UK - Australia - New Zealand service until 1896. In 1893, following an engine breakdown, she made a 4,500 mile voyage under sail. In 1896 she was chartered to the Spanish Government who renamed her CAVADONGA and used her for trooping to Cuba. In 1899 she reverted to Shaw Savill ownership and her previous name TAINUI. Later the same year she was chartered to the Allan Line and made her first voyage for them from Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal, commencing 11th May 1899. Her last voyage on this service commenced 5th Oct.1899. She then came under the ownership of Anchor Line who renamed her ASTORIA, reduced her masts from four to two and on 3rd Jan.1900 started using her on their Glasgow - Moville - New York service. She continued on the transatlantic service until her last voyage commenced from Glasgow - Moville - NY - Glasgow on 10th Jan.1908. In Feb.1908 she was laid up and was scrapped in 1910. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.465] [North Star to Southern Cross by John M. Maber] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.10, Shaw Savill & Albion]

TAINUI 1908
9,957 gross tons, length 477.8ft x beam 61.1ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots. accommodation for 40-1st, 75-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers.
Built 1908 by Workman Clark & Co., Belfast for Shaw, Savill & Albion Line, she started her maiden voyage on 12th Nov. 1908 from London to Wellington via Plymouth, Tenerife, Capetown & Hobart, returning to UK via Montevideo and Rio de Janeiro. On 8th April 1918 she was torpedoed 140 miles SSW from the Lizard and abandoned but was reboarded and sailed to Falmouth stern first where she was beached. 1921 after repairs, resumed service via the Panama Canal. 25th Nov.1938 final sailing for Wellington. Mar.1939 sold for scrapping but acquired by the Ministry of Transport and renamed EMPIRE TRADER. 21st Feb.1943 torpedoed and damaged by U-92 and made for port escorted by the corvette HMCS DAUPHIN but sunk by her the next day when the ship became unmanageable.

TALMA 1923
10,000 gross tons, 451ft x 59.3ft, two funnels, two masts, single screw, speed 12 knots. Accommodation for 62-1st, 74-2nd and capacity for 3,136 deck passengers. Built 1923 by Hawthorn, Leslie & Co, Newcastle for British India S.N. Co, she was used on the Calcutta - Rangoon - Penang - Singapore - Hong Kong - Amoy - Shanghai - Moji - Kobe service. Aug.1936 blown ashore by typhoon at Hong Kong but salvaged. 1941 became troopship. 1946 placed on Calcutta - Australia service. 1949 scrapped at Inverkeithing. [Merchant Fleets vol.11 by Duncan Haws]

TAMAR 1854
was a 1,850 gross ton steamer, two funnels, three masts, wooden hull, side paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 12 knots. She had capacity for 100-1st class passengers and also carried up to 350 deck passengers on West Indies inter-island voyages. Built by William Pitcher, Northfleet, she was launched for the Royal Mail Steam Packet Co on 31st Jan.1854 and was the company's last wooden hulled ship. Initially used as a military transport for the Crimean War, she started the West Indies service in 1855. Between 1857-1858 she was placed on the Southampton - Alexandria service in conjunction with European & Australian Royal Mail Co, before reverting to the West Indies run. She was sold in 1871. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.5, Royal Mail Lines]

TAMPICO see IMPERADOR / GUADELOUPE / SORRENTO 1854

TANGANJIKA 1922
was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1922 for the German East Africa Line. She was a 8,540 gross ton ship, length 449.1ft x beam 58.3ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. She could carry 449 passengers and had a crew of 154. Used by German East Africa Line from 1922 to 1935, she was then acquired by Hamburg America Line and on 30/6/1936 transferred to Woermann Line of Hamburg. I have no record of what services she was employed on. From 1939 she was used as a depot ship at Wilhelmshaven and on 4/11/1943 was sunk by bombs. In August 1947 she was raised and broken up at Dover. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

TANNENBURG 1934
was a 5,504 gross ton ship, built in 1934 by Stettiner Oderwerke, Stettin. Her details were - length 398ft x beam 51ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 21 knots. She could carry 1,000 passengers but had only a few cabins. She was used by Deutsches Reichsverkehr Ministerium for Baltic Sea excursion work out of Travemunde, and managed by Hamburg America Line. In 1940 she was converted to a minelayer and on July 7th 1941 was mined and sunk near Oland. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line]

TAORMINA 1884
2,422 gross tons, length 320ft x beam 38.7ft, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 11 knots, accommodation for 600-3rd class passengers. Built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow, she was launched for the Union Line, Hamburg on 12th Mar.1884. Used on the Australia service until starting her first Hamburg - New York sailing on 14th Jul.1886. Her last voyage on this route started 13th Mar.1901 and she was sold to Italian owners in 1911 and renamed TAORMIN (sic). On 18th Jan.1917 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UC.16 while 60 miles off Cornwall. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3,p.1166 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

TAORMINA 1908
The TAORMINA was a 8282 gross ton vessel built in 1908 by D & W Henderson Ltd. of Glasgow for the Italian Company, Italia Soc. di Navigazione a Vapore (Italia Line).  Her dimensions were 482ft length x 58.3ft beam, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 16 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st class and 2500-3rd class passengers. She made her maiden voyage from Genoa - Naples - New York - Philadelphia on 3.9.1908. In 1909 accommodation for 120 1st class passengers was added and in 1910 she was altered again to carry 60 1st,and 120 2nd class. On 16.12.1911 she made her last voyage on the NY - Philadelphia run, was taken over by Lloyd Italiano in 1912 and put on the Genoa - Naples - NY service. In 1918 she came under the control of Navigazione Generale Italiana and in 1919 was put on the Genoa - Marseilles - NY service and made her last voyage Genoa - Naples - NY on 8.8.1923. Resumed the same service in 1927 for one round voyage and was scrapped at Savona, Italy in 1929.

TAOS VICTORY / LISMORIA / NEON 1945
I only have general information on this ship. She was a standard wartime built 7,612 gross ton 'Victory' ship, built by the California Shipbuilding Corp, Los Angeles. Delivered on 31st Jan.1945, she entered service as a US Transport ship. In 1946 she temporarily transferred to Britain and served as a troopship, managed by Furness, Withy & Co for the Ministry of War Transport. Sold to the Donaldson Atlantic Line in 1948 and altered to a passenger/cargo ship with accommodation for 55 passengers. Used on the UK to Canada service, she was renamed LISMORIA, she was sold to shipbreakers in 1966 and renamed NEON for her final voyage to Taiwan where she was scrapped in 1967. [Victory Ships and Tankers by L.A.Sawyer & W.H.Mitchell]

TARIFA 1865
was a 2058 gross ton ship, length 292.5ft x beam 38.2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots. There was accommodation for 50-cabin and 650-3rd class passengers. Built by J.& G. Thomson, Glasgow, she was launched for the Cunard SS Co on 12th Jan.1865 for their Mediterranean service. Her first Liverpool - New York voyage started on 22nd Jul.1865 and she sailed mostly between Liverpool - Queenstown (Cobh) - New York until 1871 and made many voyages via Boston. Her last voyage on this route started on 24th Feb.1871 and on 11th Apr.1871 she switched to Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston sailings. Her last regular voyage on this service commenced 31st Jul.1873 and she sailed mostly to the Mediterranean after this, with occasional Boston sailings. Her final North Atlantic voyage to Boston started on 8th Nov.1888 and she was scrapped in Italy in 1899.

TAROBA see LEON XIII / ISLA DE CUBA 1888

TARTAR PRINCE 1895
3,272 gross tons, length 342.7ft x beam 43.2ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation for 45-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Built by Short Bros, Sunderland (engines by Blair & Co Ltd, Stockton), she was launched for the Prince Line in Jan.1895. Used on the South American service until 1897 when, on 10th Nov. she sailed from Newcastle for New York. On 30th Nov.1897 she started sailings between New York - Naples - Genoa - Leghorn - Genoa - Naples - New York. Her last crossing on this service started on 11th Jun.1902 when she sailed from Leghorn for Genoa, Naples, Palermo and New York. Transferred to a new route between New York and South Africa, she was destroyed by fire on her second voyage on 25th Nov.1902. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1233]

TASMANIA 1884 O.N. 87411
4,488 gross ton passenger ship, length 400.3ft x beam 45.2ft, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 111-1st and 42-2nd class passengers.
Launched 17th May 1884 by Caird & Co., Greenock for P&O Line and delivered to the company on 27th Jun.1884. On 16th Jul.1885 she started the first of four round voyages between London, Colombo, Melbourne and Sydney. 17th Apr.1887 wrecked Monachi Rock, Corsica in heavy seas and broke in two with the loss of 34 passengers and crew.

TASSO / SCANDINAVIAN 1852
The TASSO was a Wilson Line ship (the first of 5 ships with this name owned by the company) and sailed between Scandinavian and Baltic ports and Hull, UK. She was built by T. Wingate at Lanark, Scotland in 1852 as the SCANDINAVIAN and was a 610 gross ton ship, length 184.5ft x beam 23ft. She was renamed TASSO in 1870 and was wrecked on 14/3/1886 in Bommel fjord near Bergen, Norway with no loss of life. [The Wilson Line by A.G.Credland & M.Thompson]

TASSO / ELEFSIS / PHOTIOS 1890
1,388 gross tons, length 350ft x beam 32ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw. Built with accommodation for 28-1st, 8-2nd and 326-steerage class passengers. Launched 24th Feb.1890 by Earle's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co, Hull for Thos.Wilson & Co, she made her maiden voyage between Hull and Trondheim in May 1890. 1901 Lengthened to 270ft, 1,467 gross tons with accommodation for 44-1st class passengers. 22nd Jan.1911 Badly damaged in collision with the Hamburg America Line steamer PRESIDENT LINCOLN in fog near the Straits of Dover, but managed to reach Dover. 23rd Aug.1911 Sold to William Morphy & Sons, Hull after being repaired. 1914 sold to Achaia Steamship Co, London (W. Morphy & Crowe & Stevens, managers), renamed ELEFSIS ans registered at Patras, Greece. 1917 sold to Anghelatos, Piraeus. 1919 sold to A. Panayotides, Marseilles, registered at Piraeus and renamed PHOTIOS. 25th Dec.1920 foundered in position 42.54N 09.45E between Corsica and Elba with cement and general cargo.[Wilson Line by John Harrower]

TAURIC / WELSHMAN 1891
5728 gross tons, length 460.8ft x beam 49.1ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw, speed 13 knots. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast as a cattle carrier for the White Star Line, she was launched on 12th Mar.1891 and started her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York on 22nd May 1891. On her maiden voyage, she carried two cabin and one steerage class passenger, and the largest number she carried westbound were seven cabin and ten steerage class in 1893. Sold to Dominion Line in 1903, she started her first Liverpool - Portland voyage on 12th March and was renamed WELSHMAN in 1904. Transferred to the Leyland Line in 1921 and scrapped in 1929. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor. vol.2, p.759] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.2]

TEBEA 1915 see WANDRAHM 1890

TENNYSON / EVANGELINE / VALPARAISO 1900
3,901 gross tons, length 371.5ft x beam 45.2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. Accommodation for 70-1st, 24-2nd and 48-3rd class passengers. Built by Alex.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow, she was completed for Furness, Withy & Co in Oct.1900 as the EVANGELINE. Used on their Liverpool - Halifax - St.John NB service, she proved to be too large for the route and to have too much passenger capacity. Sold to Lamport & Holt Line in 1902, and renamed TENNYSON, she was placed on their New York - Brazil - River Plate passenger service. With the advent of new ships in 1906, the TENNYSON's route terminated at Santos. In Sep.1914 she was taken over by the Admiralty and employed as a convoy commodore ship, and in 1922 was sold to Soc.Anon Commercial Braun & Blanchard, Chile, renamed VALPARAISO and used on Chilean coastal services. Scrapped in Italy in 1932. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.34, Lamport & Holt Line]

TENYO MARU 1908
13,454 gross tons, length 558ft x beam 61.9ft, two funnels, two masts, triple screw, speed 20 knots, accommodation for 275-1st, 54-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. Built 1908 by Mitsubishi Dockyard & Eng. Works, Nagasaki for Toyo Kisen K.K., Tokyo and used on Hong Kong - Yokohama - San Francisco passenger services. In 1926 the company became Nippon Yusen K.K., Tokyo. 1930 laid up, 1933 scrapped in Japan.

TERENCE 1902
The TERENCE was a 4,309 gross ton ship, built for Lamport & Holt Line of Liverpool in 1902 by D & W. Henderson Ltd, Glasgow. Her details were - length 390.2ft x beam 50.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Launched on 22nd Apr.1902, she sailed from the Clyde on her maiden voyage to Rio de Janeiro on 10th June 1902. She was used on various services until 28th Apr.1917 when she was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine near Fastnet. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

TEUTONIA / REGINA / PIEMONTESE / CITTA DI SAVONA / MENTANA 1856
was a 2,693 gross ton ship, built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1856 for the Hamburg - Brazil Line. Her details were - length 282.1ft x beam 39.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st, 135-2nd and 310-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4th Aug.1856, she left Hamburg on 20th Dec.1856 on her maiden voyage to Southampton, Lisbon, Pernambuco, Bahia and Rio de Janeiro. She started her last voyage on this service on 20th Oct.1857 and was then sold to Hamburg America Line. Her first voyage for these owners started 15th Jul.1859 when she sailed from Hamburg for Southampton and New York. In Nov.1867 she started winter sailings between Hamburg and New Orleans. Her last Hamburg - Havre - New York voyage started 31st May 1870 and she subsequently ran between Hamburg and the West Indies. Fitted with compound engines in 1872, she was sold to Dominion Line of Liverpool in 1877. Commenced Liverpool - New Orleans sailings on 13th Mar.1877 and Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyages on 22nd Aug.1878. Sold to other British owners in 1883, she was resold in 1884 to Francesco Costa of Italy and renamed REGINA. In 1889 she was renamed PIEMONTESE and in 1890 became CITTA DI SAVONA. Sold to Schiaffino in 1891 and named MENTANA, she was finally scrapped in Italy in 1894. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.388-9] [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America, Adler and Carr Lines.]

TEUTONIC 1889
was a 9,984 gross ton ship, built in 1889 by Harland & Wolff, Belfast for the White Star Line. Her details were - length 565.8ft x beam 57.8ft, two funnels, three masts, twin screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 300-1st, 190-2nd and 1,000-3rd class. Launched on 19th Jan.1889, she sailed from Liverpool for Spithead on 1st Aug. to take part in the Naval Review, and was the first Armed Merchant Cruiser. On 7th Aug.1889 she commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. In Aug.1891 she made a record passage of 5 days 16 hrs 31mins between Queenstown and Sandy Hook, and commenced her last Liverpool - Queenstown - New York voyage on 15th May 1907. On 12th Jun.1907 she started Southampton - Cherbourg - New York sailings and commenced her last voyage on this service on 19th Apr.1911. Transferred to the Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal service on 13th May 1911 with accommodation for 550-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. On 20th Sep.1914 she was requisitioned as an Armed Merchant Cruiser and served with the 10th Cruiser Squadron. On 16th Aug.1915 she was purchased by the British Admiralty and became a troopship in 1918. Laid up at Cowes, Isle of Wight in 1921 and was scrapped later the same year at Emden. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.759]

TEVERE / GABLONZ 1912
8,448 gros tons, length 452.4ft x beam 53.9ft, twin screw, speed 16 knots, accommodation for 86-1st, 107-2nd and 290-3rd class passengers. Completed Nov.1912 by Cantiere San Rocco, Trieste as the GABLONZ for Lloyd Austriaco, Trieste, Austria-Hungary, she transferred to the ownership of Lloyd Triestino, Italy in 1919 after Trieste became a part of Italy. 1921 renamed TEVERE. In May 1940 she was requisitioned by the Royal Italian Navy and converted to a hospital ship. 17th Feb.1941 heavily damaged by a mine off Tripoli, she stranded at the entrance to Tripoli Harbour while being towed out, and on 20th Jan.1943 was scuttled there as a blockship during the German evacuation. 1950 refloated and scrapped at Savona.[Register of Merchant Ships Completed in 1912 by Starke / Schell] [The World's Merchant Fleets 1939 by Roger Jordan]

TEVIOT 1841
1,744 gross tons, overall length 275ft x beam (over paddle boxes) 60ft, wooden hull, one funnel, three masts (barquentine rigged), side paddle wheel propulsion, speed 9 knots, accommodation for 100 passengers.
Built 1841 by Robert Duncan, Greenock for Royal Mail Steam Packet Co., London, she started her maiden voyage on 15th Feb.1842 between Southampton and the West Indies. 2nd Nov.1847 inaugurated the Southampton - New Orleans service. 9th Jan.1851 inaugurated Southampton - Lisbon - Madeira - Teneriffe - St. Vincent, Cape Verde Islands - Pernambuco - Bahia - Rio de Janeiro service. 1857 placed on Southampton - Alexandria service of European & Australian Royal Mail Co. until operation ceased in 1858, then returned to South America route. 1864 sold and broken up.

TEXAS 1872
The TEXAS was a 2,372 gross ton ship.length 325.5ft x beam 36.3ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. Accommodation for 80-cabin and 600-3rd class passengers. Built by A. McMillan & Son, Dumbarton (engines by J.& J. Thomson, Glasgow), she was launched on 21st Aug.1872 for the Dominion Line of Liverpool. Her maiden voyage started on 12th Dec.1872 when she sailed from Liverpool for Boston and Portland. On 17th Apr.1873 she started her first Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyage and between 1873 and 1884 sailed to Canada in the summer and also made some New Orleans sailings in the winter. In 1882 she was chartered by the British Government for the Egyptian Expedition and on 27th Jun.1885 commenced her first Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal sailing. Her last voyage on this route started on 12th May 1894 and on 5th Jun.1894 she was wrecked near Cape Race with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.804]

THAMES 1826
the 514 ton THAMES, built 1826 by Fletcher Fearnall, Limehouse for the Dublin & London Steam Packet Co., Dublin and was a passenger / cargo ship. In 1837 she came under the ownership of City of Dublin S.P. Co. when the Dublin & London S.P. Co. went into liquidation. On a voyage Dublin to London with passengers, she was wrecked in a gale on 4th Jan.1841 on Ponds Reef, Scilly Isles. Only four persons of the 66 on board were saved.

THEMISTOCLES 1908 see MORAITIS 1907

THEMISTOCLES 1911
11,231 gross tons, length 500.6ft x beam 62.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 15 knots. Accommodation for 103-1st, 400-3rd and 500-emigrant class passengers in the 'tween decks. Built by Harland & Wolff, Belfast, she was launched for the Aberdeen Line on 22nd Sep.1910 and started her maiden voyage from London to Sydney on 16th Feb.1911. Between 1914-1919 she was used as a troopship and resumed commercial sailings to Australia on 20th July 1920. From 1928 she came under the management of White Star Line and operated London - Brisbane on the Aberdeen Line - White Star - Blue Funnel joint service. Transferred to Shaw, Savill & Albion Line in 1932 after the collapse of White Star, she started Liverpool - Australia sailings in June. During WWII she remained in commercial service and was eventually laid up in 1946 after 79 voyages to Australia and was scrapped at Dalmuir the following year. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, Aberdeen Line]

THEODORE MANTE / MUSTAPHA II / DJEBEL-ANTAR / HELENDRA / GATUN / ALICE / MARGIT 1912
3,496 gross ton passenger ship, length 344.5ft x beam 44.6ft, single screw, speed 16 knots. Built 1912 by Forges & Chantiers de la Mediteranee, La Seyne (Yard No.1055) for Cie. de Navigation Mixte, Marseilles. 1917 renamed MUSTAPHA II, same owner. 1933 renamed DJEBEL-ANTAR, same owner, 1937 sold to Lamorna Shipping Co., Ltd (J. A. Billmeir), London renamed HELENDRA. 1938 sold to Edouard Godillot (A. Davaris, manager), Colon, Panama renamed GATUN, 1938 renamed ALICE, same owner, 1938 renamed MARGIT, same owner, 1940 owners became Margit SS Co, Colon (Managed by Emlyn-Jones, Griffin & Co, Cardiff), 19th Apr.1941 bombed and sunk in Kalkara Creek, Malta. [Information from Registers of Merchant Ships Completed by Starke / Schell.]

THE QUEEN 1865
was a 3,412 gross ton ship built by Laird Bros, Birkenhead in 1865 for the National Line of Liverpool. Her details were - length 381.1ft x beam 42.4ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 29th Apr.1865, she sailed from Liverpool on 23rd Aug.1865 on her maiden voyage to Queenstown (Cobh) and New York. In 1867 she served as an Abyssinian campaign transport and in 1872 was rebuilt to 4,441 gross tons. Her first London - Havre - New York sailing commenced 21st May 1872 and her last voyage on this route started 16th Jan.1873. She was fitted with compound engines by G.Forrester & Co, Liverpool in 1873-4 and on 22nd Apr.1874 resumed Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailings. Between 1880 - 1886 she sailed Liverpool or London to New York and from 14th Apr.1886 sailed Liverpool - New York only. Her last voyage with cabin class passengers commenced 25th Jul.1889 and her last with 3rd class passengers started 12th Mar.1892. She started the National Line's last Liverpool - New York voyage with cargo only, on 22nd Feb.1894 and on 13th Apr.1894 resumed London - New York sailings, making her last on 23rd Dec.1894. In 1896 she was sold and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.612]

THE QUEEN 1903
THE QUEEN was a 1,676 gross ton ship, length 319ft x beam 40ft, two funnels, two masts, triple screw and a speed of 21 knots. Capacity for 400 passengers. Built by Wm.Denny, Dumbarton, she was launched for the South Eastern & Chatham Railway Co on 4th Apr.1903 and delivered on 15th June. Her maiden voyage took place on 27th June from Folkestone to Calais and Dover and she subsequently sailed Dover - Calais, her loaded depth being too great for Folkestone harbour at the time. In 1907 after the harbour was deepened, she transferred to the Folkestone service. Taken over for trooping to France in 1914, she encountered the French ship AMIRAL GANTEAUME on 26th Oct. stopped with mine damage and carrying 2,500 refugees from Calais to Havre. The weather being too rough for lifeboats, THE QUEEN was skilfully put alongside the French ship, allowing the passengers to scramble aboard. On 26th Aug.1916 when bound for Folkestone and empty, she was captured off Varne Bank by one of ten German destroyers. After the crew abandoned the ship, she was sunk with time bombs. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.24, Britain's Railway Steamers]

THERAPIA / BALTIKA / DANZIG 1901
3781 gross tons, length 111.56m x 13.56m, one funnel, two masts, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 86-1st and 648-3rd class passengers. Launched 21st Dec.1901 by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg for the Deutsche Levante Line as the THERAPIA. 1913 sold to Baltischer Lloyd, Danzig and renamed BALTIKA. 1914 scuttled, 1915 raised and repaired and became German Navy minesweeper. 1918 came under the ownership of North German Lloyd, Bremen and 1920 "bought" by a Danich company in the Stinnes group and chartered to Deutsche Ost-Afrika Linien. Made her first post war sailing to Africa under the Russian flag. She was then registered in Copenhagen and sailed under the Danish flag on the same route. 1922 sold to Artus Reederei, Danzig, renamed DANZIG and operated on the Hamburg - South America service between 1925-1926. In 1927 she went to Hamburg America Line, passenger accommodation removed and in 1930 was scrapped at Bremerhaven. [Die Schiffe der deutschen Afrika Linien by A. Kludas contains photo of the ship] [Norddeutscher Lloyd, Bremen, vol.1 by Edwin Dreschel]

THERMOPYLAE 1891
3,711 gross tons, length 362ft x beam 44.2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), single screw, speed 13 knots, accommodation for 45-1st and 650-emigrant class passengers. Built in 1891 by Hall, Russell & Co, Aberdeen for the Aberdeen Line, she started her maiden voyage from London to Australia via Capetown on 24th Nov. She continued on this service and in 1896 was fitted with refrigerating machinery for the carriage of frozen meat. On 11th Sep.1899 she was wrecked on Mouille Point, Table Bay during fog with no loss of life, but the ship was a total loss. [Merchant Fleets, vol.17 by Duncan Haws]

THESSALONIKI / CITY OF VIENNA 1889
The "Thessaloniki" was built by Workman, Clark & Co Ltd, Belfast in 1889 for the City Line. She was a 4,682 gross ton ship, length 421.3ft x beam 46.7ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 50-1st, 50-2nd and 1,900-3rd class passengers. Launched on 7/12/1889 as the "City of Vienna", she sailed for the (Ellerman) City Line except for a period starting May 1906 when she was chartered to the Allan Line and completed three round voyages between Glasgow, Liverpool and Philadelphia. In 1914 she was sold to the National Greek Line and renamed "Thessaloniki". She commenced her first voyage for these owners on 16/2/1914 when she left Piraeus for Kalamata, Patras, Palermo and New York. On 24/11/1915 she sailed from Piraeus for New York but called for assistance on 22nd December with disabled engines. The National Greek Line vessel "Patris" attempted unsuccesfully to tow her to port, and she was eventually scuttled on 5/1/1916 when 350 miles east of Sandy Hook. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.323; vol.4,p.1416]

THIBET / CASHMERE 1874
Official number 70628. Tonnage 2,593 gross tons, length 360ft x beam 36.2ft, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), twin cylinder compound engine, speed 11 knots, accommodation for 59-1st and 24-2nd class passengers. Employed on the Indian service. Launched on 29th Aug.1874 by Gourlay Bros & Co, Dundee (yard No.62) for P & O Steam Navigation Co. 1875 employed as a transport during the expedition to relieve the Sudanese garrison and carried 1,500 troops from Suez to Souakim. 1885 fitted with new boilers. 1890 Converted at Bombay to a cargo liner for the Japan service. 1895 sold to Hajee Cassum Joosub, Bombay. 1896 renamed CASHMERE. 1898 scrapped at Bombay. [P & O. A Fleet History by Rabson & O'Donoghue]

THINGVALLA 1874
This is the THINGVALLA belonging to the Danish Thingvalla Line. This was a 2,524 gross ton ship, built by Burmeister & Wain, Copenhagen in 1874. Her details were - length 300.7ft x beam 37.2ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 50-1st, 50-2nd and 900-3rd class. Launched in Oct.1874, for the "Sailing & Steamship Co of 1873" of Copenhagen, there is no evidence that she was used as a passenger ship before being bought by the Thingvalla Line in 1880. She commenced her first voyage for these owners in April 1880 when she sailed from Copenhagen to Newcastle and New York. On 14/8/1888 she collided with and sank the Thingvalla Line vessel GEISER with the loss of 105 lives. On 19/5/1890 she was slightly damaged in collision with an iceberg and on 15/9/1898 sailed from Stettin on her last voyage to Copenhagen, Christiania, Christiansand and New York. In 1898 she went to the Scandinavian American Line and on 9/11/1898 commenced her first voyage for these owners from Copenhagen to Christiania, Christiansand and New York. On 26/5/1900 she commenced her last voyage from Stettin to Copenhagen, Christiania, Christiansand and New York. She was sold to Norwegian owners the same year and in September 1903, stranded at Torgfjord, was sold and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1050]

The ship was named after the field in Iceland where the old assemblies of the people were held according to Norse custom and usage, and where resolutions were passed for the benefit of their commonwealth. The year 1874 when the "Thingvalla" was built marked the 10th centenary of settlement in Iceland.

THURINGIA / PETERSBURG / ST. PETERSBURG / BEREZAN / SOVETSKAJA ROSSIJA 1870
Built by Caird & Co, Greenock in 1870 for the Hamburg America Line, this was a 3,133 gross ton ship, length 350.3ft x beam 40ft, straight stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was capacity for 102-1st, 136-2nd and 620-3rd class passengers. She was one of a class of seven near-sister ships. Launched on 18/5/1870, she sailed from Hamburg on her maiden voyage to New York on 27/10/1870. She continued on this service until commencing her last Hamburg - Havre - New York voyage on 12/5/1875, and was then laid up. In 1878 she was sold to the Russian Volunteer Fleet and renamed PETERSBURG. Renamed ST.PETERSBURG in 1892, she was transferred to the Imperial Russian Navy in 1893, renamed BEREZAN, rebuilt as a minelayer and stationed in the Black Sea. Renamed SOVETSKAJA ROSSIJA in 1921 and used as a depot ship and workshop. Bonsor states that she was still in service in 1939 and was probably lost during World War II, whereas Duncan Haws says that she was broken up in 1925. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.390] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.4, Hamburg America Line, p.34]

THURINGIA / GENERAL SAN MARTIN / EMPIRE DEBEN 1922
11,343 gross tons, length 473.6ft x beam 60.7ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 13 knots. Accommodation for 158-cabin and 680-3rd class passengers. Built by Howaldstwerke, Kiel (engines by Brown, Boveri & Co, Mannheim), she was launched on 12th Aug.1922 for the Hamburg America Line. Her maiden voyage from Hamburg to New York started on 22nd Jan.1923 and her last from Hamburg to Cobh, Halifax and New York started 9th Jan.1930. Transferred to the South America service in 1930, she was renamed GENERAL SAN MARTIN and in 1934 was chartered to the Hamburg South American Line. Sold to this company in 1936 and in 1939 became an accommodation ship for the German Navy, and later a hospital ship. In 1945 she transported 30,000 refugees to the West in 11 operations during the German evacuation of Eastern Territories. Handed to Britain in Oct.1945, she was refitted as a troopship and in 1946 was renamed EMPIRE DEBEN. Managed by Shaw, Savill & Albion Line until 1949 when she was scrapped at Newport, Wales. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.416] [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas, vol.2]

THYSVILLE / EMPIRE TEST 1922
8,300 gross tons, length 459ft x beam 57ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots. Accommodation for 178-1st and 136-2nd class passengers. Built by John Cockerill, Hoboken for Cie Belge Maritime du Congo, she was launched as the THYSVILLE and commenced her maiden voyage from Antwerp to the Belgian Congo on 2nd Oct.1922. In 1930 the company was merged into Cie Maritime Belge (Lloyd Royal) and in 1940 on the invasion of Belgium by the Germans, she was operated by the Belgian Government on charter to the Allies. Acquired by the Ministry of Defence in 1947 for relief trooping, she was renamed EMPIRE TEST, and was painted white with a blue band round her hull, yellow funnel and cream masts. There was capacity for 800 passengers/troops. Her final trooping voyage took place in 1952 from the Middle East to Liverpool with the Devonshire Regiment and she was then scrapped at Faslane. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.34, Lamport & Holt Line]

TIBER 1846
was a 764 gross ton, iron hulled paddle steamer, length 183.8ft x beam 26.7ft x depth 17..2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts. Built 1846 by Caird & Co., Greenock for Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co (P&O Line) she was employed on the U.K. - Spain, Portugal, Italy and Black Sea passenger and cargo services. On 21st Feb.1847 she struck a rock off Vila de Cupa near Oporto in dense fog and sank in deep water within minutes while on voyage Gibraltar to Southampton. No loss of life but the cargo and mails were lost.

TIBET 1883
2,703 gross tons, length 332ft x beam 40ft (101.19m x 12.19m), one funnel, two masts, iron and steel construction, twin screw, speed 12 knots. Built 1883 by Forges & Chantiers de la Mediteranee, La Seyne for Compagnie Fraissinet, Marseilles who operated services to the Mediterranean and Black Sea. In late 1886 the company placed the TIBET on the Marseilles - Genoa - Montevideo - Buenos Aires service and she continued these voyages until starting her last one on 1st Sep.1890 when they withdrew from the South American trade.[South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor].

TILAWA 1924
10,006 gross tons, length 471ft x beam 59.4ft, two funnels, two masts, single screw, speed 13 knots. Accommodation for 135-1st & 2nd class passengers and approx.1,000 steerage class. Built by Hawthorn, Leslie & Co, Newcastle, she was launched on 20th Feb.1924 for the British India Steam Navigation Co's Calcutta to Japan service. On 23rd Nov.1942 while on voyage Bombay to Mombasa, she was torpedoed in the early morning by the Japanese submarine I-29. Panic ensued among the steerage passengers which lead to unnecessary loss of life when the lifeboats were lowered. About one hour later, the ship was still afloat and just as the crew and passengers were preparing to re-board her, she was again torpedoed and sunk at position 08.36N 61.08E. There were 280 lives lost. [Great Passenger Ships of the World by Arnold Kludas]

TOFUA 1908
4345 gross tons, built 1908 by Wm.Denny & Co, Dumbarton for the Union SS Co of New Zealand. Laid up in Auckland from 12th Apr.1932, sold to Miyachi K.K.K., Kobe in 1934 and scrapped at Osaka. [Union Fleet 1875-1975 by I.J. Farquhar]

TOKOMARU 1893
6,238 gross tons, length 425ft x beam 58.2ft, one funnel, three masts, single screw, speed 11 knots, limited passenger accommodation.
Built 1893 by C. S. Swan & Hunter, Newcastle as the WESTMEATH for R. M. Hudson, Sunderland. 1894 sold to Shaw Savill and Albion Line, fitted with refrigerated cargo space and renamed TOKOMARU. 20th Jan.1915 torpedoed and sunk off Le Havre while anchored awaiting a pilot. No lives lost.

TOLEDO 1922 see KIGOMA 1914

TOMASO DI SAVOIA 1907
7,761 gross tons, length 450.7ft x beam 55.2ft, two funnels, two masts. twin screw, speed 16 knots, accommodation for 150-1st, 150-2nd and 1,200-3rd class passengers. Launched 15th Sep.1907 by Barclay, Curle & Co, Glasgow for Lloyd Sabaudo, Genoa, she started her maiden voyage on 11th Nov. from Genoa for South American ports. On 16th Jun.1909 [sic *] she started her first Genoa - Naples - Palermo - New York sailing and made one summer sailing on this route in 1909, 1910 and 1911, before reverting to South American sailings. From Sep.1914 to Aug.1915 due to wartime demand, she made five New York sailings and then reverted to South American voyages. 1928 scrapped in Italy.[South Atlantic Seaway by N. R. P. Bonsor] [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.3 by N.R.P.Bonsor]
* Bonsor gives 16th June for first NY voyage and Haws gives the same date, however, 6th June 1909 is the correct date.

TONGARIRO / ZIBENGHLA 1883
TONGARIRO 4,163 g.t. 389ft x 46ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, iron hull, single screw, 12 knots. 80-1st, 80-2nd, 250-3rd class passengers. (sister ship to RUAPEHU). Built J. Elder &Co, Glasgow. Launched in Aug.1883 for NZSCo, London - NZ service. Chartered to Beaver Line and started first Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailing 6/8/1898. Eighth and last sailing on this service May 1899. Sold British India SN Co 1900, renamed ZIBENGHLA. Scrapped Bombay 1910.

TORONTO / PINA 1880
The TORONTO was a 3,316 gross ton ship, built for the Dominion Line of Liverpool in 1880 by C. Connell & Co, Glasgow (engines by J&J. Thomson, Glasgow). Her details were - length 329.5ft x beam 39.3ft, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 12 knots. There was accommodation for 30-cabin class and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 27th Jan.1880, she sailed on her maiden voyage on 26th Mar.1880 from Liverpool for Halifax and Portland. On 7th May 1880 she started her first Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailing. Chartered to the Inman Line, she started a single round voyage between Liverpool, Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 16th Nov.1886 and on 8th Feb.1889 commenced her first Avonmouth - Portland voyage. Her last Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal sailing started 3rd Aug.1894 and her last Avonmouth - Quebec - Montreal sailing on 17th Oct.1894. Sold the same year to Italian owners, she was renamed PINA and was scrapped in 1897. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.806]

TORTONA / AUSONIA 1909
7,907 gross tons, length 450.6ft x beam 54.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw, speed 12 knots, accommodation for 37-1st and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 18th Aug.1909 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Wallsend-on-Tyne (engines by Palmers Co., Ltd, Jarrow) as the TORTONA for the Thomson Line, she sailed on 22nd Oct.1909 from Middlesbrough for Quebec and Montreal. On 20th Nov.1909 she left Montreal for Quebec, Naples, Genoa and Leghorn and in Mar.1910 made her first Naples - Portland voyage. She later sailed between Naples, Quebec and Montreal and between London, Quebec and Montreal. In 1911 she was sold to the Cunard SS Co and renamed AUSONIA. Used on their new London - Southampton - Quebec - Montreal service until Aug.1914 when she was chartered to Anchor Line and made four Glasgow - Moville - New York voyages after which she returned to Cunard's Canada service. On 30th May 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.55 in the North Atlantic with the loss of 55 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

TOSCANA 1923
9,442 gross tons, length 480ft x beam 62.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots. Built 1923 by Akties Gen. Weser, Bremen as the SAARBRUCKEN for North German Lloyd, Bremen. 24th Oct.1924 maiden voyage Bremerhaven - New York. 1935 Aquired by Italy and renamed TOSCANA for the Abyssinisn campaign and made 16 trooping voyages.
1937 Transferred to Lloyd Triestino, Trieste. June 1940 converted to a hospital ship. 1943 After the Italian armistice she continued as a base receiving hospital ship under Italian / British control. Oct.1946 reverted to Lloyd Triestino. Feb.1947 used to bring Italian civilians back from Istria, now part of Jugoslavia. July 1947 refitted to accommodate 136-cabin, 220-3rd and 470-steerage class passengers. Jan.1948 used on the East Africa, Durban service. Oct.1948 commenced Trieste - Sydney service. 18th Aug,1959 final sailing to Australia. Dec.1960 withdrawn from service and laid up. 1962 scrapped at Genoa.

TOWER HILL / TURANIAN 1880
TOWER HILL was 4021 gross tons, length 420.4ft x beam 45.1ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw, speed 12 knots. Accommodation for 30-1st class passengers. Built by Dobie & Co, Glasgow (engines by J. Howden & Co, Glasgow), she was launched for the Twin Screw Line, Liverpool on 28th Jun.1880. On 5th May 1883 she started her first Liverpool - New York - London voyage and on 23rd Jun.1883 commenced London - New York sailings. In 1886 accommodation for 70-2nd plus 3rd class passengers was added and on 2nd Apr.1891 she started her last voyage on this route for the Twin Screw Line. On 10th Jun.1891 she started sailings on the same route for Wilson-Hill Line and on 17th Oct.1896 under charter to Wilson's & Furness-Leyland Line. Sold to the Allan Line, she commenced a single round voyage between Glasgow and New York on 1st Jul.1897 before being renamed TURANIAN and continuing on the same service. Switched to the Glasgow - South America route on 22nd Apr.1899, she stranded on the Cape Verde Islands in Nov. 1899, was salvaged and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1146]

TRANSYLVANIA 1914
14,315 gross tons, length 548.8ft x beam 66.6ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw, speed 16 knots, accommodation for 263-1st, 260-2nd and 1,858-3rd class passengers. Built by Scott's Shipbuilding & Eng. Co., Greenock, she was launched on 23rd May 1914 for the joint Cunard-Anchor Line service between the Mediterranean and New York. However, due to the war, she started Liverpool - New York sailings on 7th Nov.1914. On 4th Feb.1915 she was purchased outright by Anchor Line and transferred to the Glasgow - Liverpool - New York route. In May 1915 she became a troopship and was used on the Alexandria - Marseilles route and on 3rd May 1917 she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.63 in the Gulf of Genoa with the loss of 414 crew and troops. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1 by N.R.P.Bonsor] [Merchant Fleets vol.9 by Duncan Haws]

TRANSYLVANIA 1925
The TRANSYLVANIA was laid down in 1919 (Duncan Haws states 1923) but wasn't launched until 11/3/1925. She was built by Fairfield & Co. Ltd., Glasgow for the Anchor Line of Glasgow and was a 16,923 gross ton vessel, length 552.4ft x beam 70.3ft, three funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 279-1st, 344-2nd and 800-3rd class passengers. She sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage for Moville and New York on 12/9/1925. On 22/11/1928 she stood by the sinking German freighter HERRENWIJK of the Lubeck Line for 15 hours in tempestuous seas. Launched lifeboats and a raft were smashed against the hull until eventually the ESTONIA of the East Asiatic Co. stood to the lee of the larger TRANSYLVANIA and took off 5 men and rescued a further 8 men from the sea when the HERRENWIJK sank, but 13 men drowned. On 28/3/1929 the TRANSYLVANIA grounded in fog, on La Coeque Rocks, 10 miles west of Cherbourg. She refloated and disembarked her passengers at Cherbourg, and then proceeded to the Clyde for builder's repairs. She didn't resume service until June of that year. In Oct.1930, she was altered to carry 1st, tourist and 3rd class passengers and in March 1936 to carry cabin, tourist and 3rd class. In 1935 she carried out summer cruises to Bermuda and in 1937 was reconditioned, her third class accommodation was remodelled and her speed increased to 17 knots. Between 1937 and 1939 she made summer cruises to the West Indies. On 18/8/1939 she commenced her last voyage from Glasgow - Moville - New York - Moville - Glasgow and on Sept.7th 1939 was requisitioned and refitted as an Armed Merchant Cruiser and attached to the 10th Cruiser squadron. On 10/8/1940 she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-56, 35 miles west of Inistrahull, Northern Ireland and although taken in tow, she sank with the loss of 48 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.470] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9 Anchor Line]

TRAVE 1886
The "Trave" was built by Fairfield & Co, Glasgow in 1886 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [ North German Lloyd]. She was a 4969 gross ton vessel, length 438ft x beam 48.1ft, two funnels, four masts, single screw and a speed of 17 knots. There was accommodation for 150-1st, 90-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 18/2/1886, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 5/6/1886. In 1896/7 she was refitted and two of her masts removed and on 29/1/1901 she left Bremen on her last voyage to New York. She was them transferred to the Genoa - Naples - New York run on 20/3/1900 and commenced her last voyage on 23/4/1903. Between 1903-1906 she was laid up and on 11/3/1906 resumed the Bremen - New York service. She made nine round voyages on this service, the last one commencing 26/10/1907 and was then sold and scrapped in 1909.

TRINACRIA 1871
The TRINACRIA was a 2,107 gross ton ship, built by Robert Duncan & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by Finnieston Steamship Works, Glasgow). Her details were - length 306ft x beam 34.4ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 75-1st, 100-2nd and 500-3rd class passengers. Launched in July 1871 for the Anchor Line of Glasgow, she left Glasgow on 2nd Sep.1871 on her maiden voyage to Liverpool, Halifax, St John, NB and New York (arr.26th Sep.) On 19th Oct.1871 she started her first Glasgow - New York voyage and commenced her 18th and last sailing on this service on 14th May 1874. Meanwhile, in Dec.1872 she had commenced the first of two voyages between Glasgow, Trieste, Messina, Palermo, Valencia, New York and Glasgow, and started the second sailing on this route on 6th Jul.1874. Between April 1875 and Oct. 1879 she made 13 round voyages between Liverpool and Bombay, and in 1879 made two Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow sailings. On 24th Apr. 1880 she made a single London - New York voyage and from 1800-1881 made six London - Halifax - Boston sailings. From 1881-1892 she was used on the Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow service and made 28 round voyages on this route. Rebuilt to 2,256 gross tons, with accommodation for 69-1st and 910-3rd class passengers in 1882, she sailed from Glasgow in June 1883 for Liverpool - Calcutta - Marseilles - Genoa - Naples - New York and Glasgow. On 3rd July 1892 she commenced her last voyage from Leghorn to Palermo, Naples and New York (arr 29th Jul.) and on 7th Feb.1893 was wrecked near Cape Vilano, Spain.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.457]

I can't find any mention of this ship sailing to New Orleans, but there is a description of her wrecking.
Left Greenock on Feb.2nd 1893 with four passengers and 37 crew for the Mediterranean with Gibraltar the first port of call. The crossing of the Bay of Biscay was extremely rough and on Feb.7th at 6am, in heavy seas and poor visibility, the ship grounded 4 miles NE of Cape Vilano lighthouse near Finisterre. She immediately started to break up in the heavy seas and the four female passengers were put into the only lifeboat it was possible to launch, but they were drowned when it capsized. Then a massive sea burst into the ship, collapsing the funnel and ventilators which fell into the ship. At the same time, the masts went overboard. Thirty crew were swept away, including Capt.Murray to bring the death toll to 34. Only seven managed to reach shore. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line]
(There was another "Trinacria" which was the ex"America" of the National Line of Liverpool. Sold to the Italian Navy in 1887, she was used as a cruiser, torpedo school, transport, royal yacht and exhibition ship at various times until scrapped in 1925. I don't have any details of her career during this period.)

TRIPOLI 1863
The TRIPOLI was a 2,057 gross ton steamship, length 292.5ft x beam 38.2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, two masts, iron hull, single screw, speed 11 knots, accommodation for 50-1st and 650-3rd class passengers. Built by J & G. Thomson, Glasgow, she was launched on 15th Aug.1863 for Cunard SS Co's Mediterranean services. On 19th Aug.1865 she started her first Liverpool - Halifax - New York voyage and between 1865-1872 sailed between Liverpool - Queenstown - New York (many voyages via Boston). Latterly she sailed Liverpool - Queenstown - Boston and made a total of 45 North Atlantic voyages. On 17th May 1872 she was wrecked on Tuskar Rock. St. George's Channel with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.148 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

TRIUMPH 1880
The TRIUMPH was built in 1880 by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co, Middlesborough for McIntyre Bros & Co. She was a 2,749 gross ton, iron built steamer with a speed of 12 knots. She instituted a new service in September 1883 between London, Plymouth, Auckland and Wellington for Shaw Savill & Albion, carrying 2nd class and emigrant passengers and cargo. She had a brief career, for on 29th November shortly after leaving Auckland for Wellington, she stranded on Tiri Tiri Island in Hauraki Gulf. She was refloated six weeks later with great difficulty, repaired at Auckland and sold. [North star to Southern Cross by John M.Maber]

TROJAN PRINCE 1896
3,273 gross tons, length 351.4ft x beam 44.6ft, clipper bows, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 12 knots. Accommodation for 40-1st and 1,260-steerage class passengers. Built by J.Readhead & Sons, South Shields, she was launched for the Prince Line's South American service on 14th May 1896. On 25th Sep.1897 she started her first voyage from New York to Naples, Genoa, Leghorn, Genoa, Naples and New York. Her last sailing from Genoa to Leghorn, Naples, Palermo, Gibraltar (called for repairs with damaged propeller and passengers transferred to SICILIAN PRINCE), and New York started on 25th May 1903. Transferred to other services, she was eventually torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.39 on 23rd Feb.1917 while 5 miles NW of Point Shershel.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1233]

TROMP / DE RUYTER 1873
The DE RUYTER was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1873 as the TROMP for T.C.Engels & Co, Flushing. She was a 2,280 gross ton ship, length 320ft x beam 36.1ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched on 15th May 1873, she sailed from Nieuwediep, Holland in June 1873 for Batavia and stranded in the Gulf of Suez on 1st July. Refloated on 10th August, she was temporarily repaired at Suez and then proceeded to La Seyne (Toulon) where she was reconditioned. She sailed to New York in ballast in June 1874 and then to London and Antwerp. The company withdrew from the Far Eastern trade and the ship was renamed DE RUYTER in 1875 and transferred from Dutch to Belgian registry. She commenced her first Antwerp - New York sailing on 6th Aug 1876, her second on 20th May 1877 and her third on 1st April 1878. Between these voyages she was used on the South American service. On 26th June 1879 she commenced joint sailings with the White Cross Line between Antwerp and New York and her last passenger sailing on this route started on 22nd July 1884. Subsequently she maintained a cargo service between Antwerp, Boston and New York. She sailed from Antwerp on her last Boston - New York voyage on 12th March 1894 but went missing with the loss of 37 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.996]

TUCUMAN 1895
4661 gross tons, length 114.6m x beam 14.0m, one funnel, two masts, speed 10 knots, accommodation for 24-1st and 440-3rd class passengers. Launched on 17th Oct.1895 by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg (Yard No.110) for Hamburg South America Line and started her maiden voyage on 1st Dec.1895 when she left Hamburg for Santos. Between 1900-1901 she was used as a troopship during the Boxer Rebellion in China, but then returned to South America sailings. In Aug.1914 she took shelter in Punta Arenas on the outbreak of war for the duration. 26th Sep.1918 the Chilean Government seized all German ships laid up in their ports and the crew of the TUCUMAN subsequently severely damaged her engines. 1919 towed back to Hamburg for repair. 14th May 1921 surrendered to the Allied Shipping Controller and on 13th Jul.1921 re-sold to the company. Jan.1927 sold to British shipbreakers. [The Hamburg South America Line by A. Kludas & others, ISBN 0-905617-50-9 contains photos of the ship]

TUNGUE 1916 see ZIETEN 1902

TUNISIAN / MARBURN 1900
The TUNISIAN was a 10,576 gross ton ship built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1900 for the Allan Line. Her details were - length 500.6ft x beam 59.2ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 240-1st, 220-2nd and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Launched on 17/1/1900, she sailed from Liverpool on her maiden voyage to Halifax and Portland on 5/4/1900. She commenced her first voyage Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal on 10/5/1900. In Jan.1907 she was chartered to Canadian Pacific who used her for four round voyages Liverpool - St.John.NB. On 4/9/1914 she commenced her last voyage Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal for the Allan Line, and was used as a troopship for the Canadian Expeditionary Force on the homeward leg. Between Nov.1914 and Feb.1915 she was used as an accommodation ship for German prisoners at Ryde, Isle of Wight and in 1915 made several trooping voyages to Bombay and Gallipoli. In 1917 she was returned to the Allan Line, who by then had been taken over by Canadian Pacific and on 12/11/1918 commenced her first peacetime voyage from London to St.John.NB. On 23/12/1918 she sailed on her first Liverpool - St.John.NB. voyage and on 23/9/1919 her first London - Quebec - Montreal run. Between May 1920 and March 1921 she was converted from coal to oil fuel and her accommodation altered to carry 310-cabin and 736-3rd class passengers. On 6/4/1921 she sailed on her first Glasgow - St.John,NB. voyage and on 2/3/1922 was renamed MARBURN. On 17/11/1922 she commenced her first Liverpool - St.John,NB. voyage, on 2/3/1923 her first Glasgow - St.John,NB. and on 13/12/1924 her first Antwerp - St.John,NB. voyage. Subsequently she ran between Hamburg, Glasgow, Antwerp or London to St.John,NB. or Montreal - Quebec. She commenced her final voyage between Antwerp - Southampton - St.John,NB. on 6/4/1928 and was then laid up at Southampton. Later the same year, she was scrapped at Genoa.

TURAKINA 1902
8349 gross tons, length 457.7ft x beam 58.2ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw, speed 14 knots. Partly refrigerated cargo space, accommodation for 60-1st, 50-2nd, 80-3rd and 170-emigrant class passengers. Built by William Denny & Bros, Dumbarton in 1902 for the New Zealand Shipping Co, London, she started her maiden voyage to NZ on 2nd Sep.1902. She continued this service until 13th Aug.1917 when she was torpedoed and sunk while 120 miles off the Scilly Islands en route to NZ via New York with 200 returning troops who had finished their service. Four crewmen were lost when a lifeboat capsized, but all passengers survived. [Merchant Fleets, vol.7 by Duncan Haws]
There was an earlier TURAKINA (1883-1899) which was a sailing emigrant carrier.

TURAKINA 1923
The TURAKINA was a 8565 gross ton ship, length 460.5ft x beam 62.7ft, single screw, speed 15 knots. Built by W. Hamilton & Co, Port Glasgow, she entered service for the New Zealand Shipping Co. in Sep.1923. On 20th Aug.1940 at 1700 hours, en route Sudney to Wellington she was attacked by the German Armed Merchant Cruiser ORION while 500 miles short of her destination. Captain J. Lord radioed his position and fought his ship for 2.5 hours before being reduced to a blazing hulk. ORION then closed and sank her with two torpedoes. 35 men were lost including the captain. 73 survivors were taken aboard ORION, some of whom were landed at Emirau Island in the Solomons together with 200 survivors from the RANGITANE. These were rescued on Christmas Day and taken to Australia. The remaining prisoners were landed at Bordeaux eight months later and interned in Germany.

TURANIAN 1897 see TOWER HILL 1880

TUSCANIA / NEA HELLAS / NEW YORK 1921
This was the NEA HELLAS which was built in 1919-21 as the third TUSCANIA for the Anchor Line of Glasgow. Built by Fairfield Co Ltd, Glasgow, she was a 16,991 gross ton ship, length overall 578.4ft x beam 70.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 16 knots. There was accommodation for 267-1st, 377-2nd and 1,818-3rd class passengers. Launched on 4/10/1921, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville and New York on 16/9/1922. Between 1922-25 she completed 5 New York - Mediterranean voyages and in May 1926 made her last Glasgow - New York - Plymouth - Havre - London voyage. She was then chartered to Cunard Line and commenced London - Havre - Southampton - New York crossings on 3/6/1926 with cabin and tourist class passengers. In December 1926 she was altered to cabin and 3rd class and in February 1927 was refitted to carry 206-cabin, 439-tourist and 485-3rd class. On 19/9/1930 she sailed on her last London - Havre - Southampton - New York voyage and in October of that year was laid up at Glasgow. In February 1931 she commenced her first Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay voyage and between 1931-37 made 13 autumn/winter voyages on this service. In May 1931 she made one Southampton - New York round voyage for Cunard and on 14/8/1931 resumed Glasgow - Moville - New York summer voyages and in September 1938 made her last voyage on this service. Sold to the Greek Line on 19/4/1939, she was renamed NEA HELLAS and refitted to carry 200-cabin, 400-tourist and 500-3rd class passengers. On 19/5/1939 she started the first of nine round voyages between Piraeus and New York, the last commencing 11/5/1940. On 8/6/1940 she transferred to the Lisbon - New York service and started the last of five round voyages on 20/10/1940. Between 1941 and 1946 she was used as a British war transport and in 1947 was reconditioned in the UK and Genoa to accommodate 300-1st, 310-cabin and 850-tourist passengers. She started her first peacetime voyage between Genoa, Naples, Lisbon and New York on 25/7/1947 and in September 1947 commenced her first voyage from Piraeus to Naples, Lisbon and New York. On 27/1/1951 she started sailings between Piraeus, Naples, Malta and New York and in January 1955 was refitted to carry 80-1st and 1,300-tourist class passengers. On 5/3/1955 she started her last voyage between Piraeus, Malta, Messina, Naples, Halifax and New York (arr.21/3/1955). Renamed NEW YORK on 24/3/1955, and commenced her first crossing from New York to Boston, Cobh, Cherbourg, Southampton, Bremen, Southampton, Cherbourg, Cobh, Halifax and New York. On 6/9/1959 she started her last voyage from Bremen to Havre, Southampton, Cobh, New York and Piraeus and on 13/10/1959 commenced her last Piraeus - Palermo - Naples - Genoa - Quebec - Genoa - Naples - Messina - Piraeus voyage. Laid up at Piraeus on 14/11/1959 she was scrapped at Onimichi, Japan in 1961. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.469]

TUSCAN STAR / EMPIRE CLARENDON / TIMARU STAR / CALIFORNIA STAR 1945
7,930 gross tons, length 457.3ft x beam 63.3ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 14 knots, accommodation for 35 passengers, reduced to 12 in 1948. Completed by Harland & Wolff, Belfast in Oct.1945 as the EMPIRE CLARENDON for the Ministry of War Transport, and managed by P & O. Steam Nav. Co. Ltd. 1946 Acquired by Frederick Leyland & Co and managed by Blue Star Line, 1947 renamed TUSCAN STAR. Aug.1948 renamed TIMARU STAR to conform with New Zealand route namings. 1950 transferred to Lamport & Holt Line. 1958 transferred to the North American Pacific coast route renamed CALIFORNIA STAR. 1959 reverted to Blue Star Line ownership, 1967 transferred to New Zealand service, Mar.1968 laid up in the River Blackwater, 22nd Jun.1968 left London on her last NZ voyage. 21st Apr.1969 arrived Kaohsiung, Taiwan for scrapping. Photos at http://www.bluestarline.org/california2.html

TWEED / MARIA VITTORIA / JOSE MONTEYS / ALESANDRIA / JOSEFINA 1870 The TWEED was built in 1870 by J.Laing, Sunderland for J.Morrison of Newcastle. She was a 1,304 gross ton ship, length 246ft x beam 30.3ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. Launched in Feb.1870, she was chartered to the Temperley Line and commenced her maiden voyage for them on 18/8/1870 from London to Quebec and Montreal. She made two round voyages for this service. In 1876 she was sold to Italian owners and was renamed MARIA VITTORIA. In 1900 she became the Spanish JOSE MONTEYS and in 1902 became the Spanish ALESANDRIA. In 1903 she was renamed JOSEFINA and in 1908 became a coal hulk. She was scrapped in 1920. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.671]

TYCHO BRAHE / PALAIS ROYALE 1867
1,848 gross tons, length 291ft x beam 34.6ft, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), single screw, speed 10 knots, accommodation for 80 passengers. Built 1867 by Andrew Leslie & Co., Hebburn-on-Tyne (engines by R. Stephenson & Co) for the Liverpool, Brazil & River Plate S.N. Co.(Lamport & Holt Line), she started her maiden voyage to South America on 26th Sep. 1878 transferred to the subsidiary company Soc. de Nav. Royal Belge Sud-Americaine, Antwerp and was used as a mail ship on the Belgium - South America service. 1892 sold to Charles Wells, London and renamed PALAIS ROYALE. 1893 owned by William Hurbatt, London as broker for her sale. 1894 purchased by Idarei Massousieh, Constantinople renamed TAIF. 30th Oct.1908 lost in collision with the Turkish Government's paddle steamer BAGDAD off Seraglio Point, Constantinople (still with her original engine). [Merchant Fleets, vol.34 by Duncan Haws]

TYRIAN 1869
The TYRIAN was a 1,039 gross ton ship, built by Robert Duncan & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by Finnieston Steamship Works, Glasgow) in 1869 for the Anchor Line of Glasgow. She had a clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (barque rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 9 knots. I have no info on her passenger accommodation, but the highest number carried by the TYRIAN or her two sister ships was 412-3rd class. Launched on 9th Sep.1869 for the Glasgow - Mediterranean service, she started her maiden voyage in Oct.1869 when she left Glasgow and instituted the company's first Glasgow - Messina - Palermo - New York - Glasgow voyage. After this single voyage, she made five Glasgow - Liverpool - Halifax - St John, NB sailings between 1870 - 1876. In August 1874 she made a London - Halifax - St John, NB voyage and between 18th Jun.1875 and 29th Oct.1877 made five Bordeaux - New York sailings. Her barque rig was removed in 1879 and she was fitted with compound engines. Between 1869 and 1888 she made 49 round voyages between Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow, starting her last crossing on 16th Feb. 1888 when she left Genoa for Leghorn, Valencia, and New York (arr.19th Mar.). From 1888-1892 she sailed New York - Jamaica for the Anchor Line and on 26th Jan.1893 was sold to Archibald Colvil of New York, who used her on the same route until 1902. Sold to the Canadian Government, she was converted to a cable layer and was used in maintaining the cable network joining Canadian Atlantic and Pacific islands with the mainland. She was scrapped in 1935. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.455] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line]

TYRRHENIA / LANCASTRIA 1920
Built by W. Beardmore & Co Ltd, Glasgow in 1920 as the TYRRHENIA for the Cunard SS Co, she was a 16,243 gross ton ship, length 552.8ft x beam 70.4ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was passenger capacity for 280-1st, 364-2nd and 1,200-3rd class. Launched on 31st May 1920 she left Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Quebec and Montreal on 13th Jun.1922. In July 1922 she made her first Glasgow - Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal voyage, and on 6th Sep.1922 started her first Liverpool - Queenstown (Cobh) - Boston voyage. The first of three Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailings commenced 19th Oct.1922 and on 21st Feb.1923 she started her first Hamburg - Southampton - Cherbourg - New York sailing. Her eighth and last voyage on this route commenced 20th Dec.1923. In 1924 she was renamed LANCASTRIA and refitted to carry 580-cabin and 1,000-3rd class passengers. Started the first of two Liverpool - Queenstown - New York sailings on 22nd Mar.1924 and on 21st Jun.1924 transferred to the Southampton - Cherbourg - New York service. On 21st May 1926 she sailed from London for Havre - Southampton - New York and in Nov.1926 was refitted to cabin, tourist and 3rd class. Her last NY voyage commenced 17th Aug.1932 and she was subsequently employed mostly cruising. On 3rd March 1939 she sailed Liverpool to New York and then ran between New York and Bermuda until September 1939 She then made two Southampton / New York and two Liverpool / New York trips before returning to Liverpool in April 1940 and being requisitioned as a troopship. On 17th June 1940 while trying to evacuate British troops from St Nazaire she was bombed and sunk, with the estimated loss of over 5,000 lives. This was the worst disaster ever to befall a British ship and the death toll was kept secret from the British public until after the end of the war. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.164]

UGANDA 1898
I have brief details of the first UGANDA. Built by A. Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1898 for British India Steam Navigation Co. 5,366 gross tons and one of a class of 14 vessels with slight differences. Length 410ft x beam 50.7ft (124,97m x 15,45m), one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 11-1st and 6-2nd class passengers. Delivered in May 1898, she made one Boer War trooping voyage in 1899 and then continued commercial sailings until 1902 when she transported the Punjabi troops from Calcutta to Sinho, China for the Peking garrison. In the Great War she was used as a transport ship and later became an ambulance transport. On June 17th 1916 she was attacked by a U-Boat in the Mediterranean while acting as an ambulance transport, and on May 25th 1918 was torpedoed off Corsica. She was taken in tow but sank two days later. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.11, British India S.N.Co]

UGANDA 1927 (ON.160181)
4,966 gross ton cargo ship, built 1927 by D & W. Henderson Ltd for SS Livingstonia Co. (Maclay & McIntyre Ltd), Glasgow. She was torpedoed and sunk on 19th Oct.1940 by the U.38 (Liebe) in the Atlantic, 250 miles WNW from Bloody Foreland in 56.37N 17.15W on passage Montreal - Halifax - Milford Haven with lumber and steel, part of convoy HX.79. The Master (Capt. C. Mackinnon) and all 39 crew were rescued by HMS JASON and landed at Methil.

ULTONIA 1898
8,845 gross ton ship, length 500ft x beam 57.4ft, one funnel, four masts, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. Built by C.S. Swan & Hunter, Wallsend-on-Tyne (engines by Sir C. Furness, Westgarth & Co, Middlesborough) as a cargo steamer for the Cunard Steamship Co, she was launched on 4th Jun.1898. On 28th Oct.1898 she underwent trials and then sailed from the Tyne for Boston. Fitted with accommodation for 675-3rd class passengers in 1899, she started her first passenger voyage on 28th Feb.1899 when she left Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) and Boston. Her last voyage on this service started on 9th Feb.1904 and she was then rebuilt to 10,402 gross tons with accommodation for 120-2nd and 2,100-3rd class passengers. On 29th Apr.1904 she started sailings from Trieste to Fiume, Naples and New York and commenced her last voyage on this route on 31st Oct.1911. Her first Southampton - Quebec - Montreal voyage started on 23rd Apr.1912, and her last on 5th Nov.1912. On 7th Dec.1912 she resumed New York - Trieste sailings and started her final voyage from Trieste to Fiume, Naples and New York on 28th Jun.1914. Between 1915-1916 she made several voyages between New York and St.Nazaire and on 27th Jun.1917 was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.53 while 190 miles from Fastnet with the loss of one life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.155]

ULUA / OCTANS 1917
"Built as a passenger ship for the United Fruit Co. by Workman Clarke & Co, Belfast, she was completed in 1917 and immediately requisitioned as a British troopship. She carried a total of 728 officers and 15,344 troops on military voyages and served primarily transporting men and materials from the USA and Canada to Britain, France and even Russia. An interesting contingent of passengers were Chinese railway workers sent to France to rebuild destroyed railway lines. She also helped to repatriate American troops from Europe and in 1919 was sent to Murmansk to return the Allied General Staff after the end of the British involvement in the Russian Civil War. After Oct.1919 she was reconditioned as a passenger ship, registered at Glasgow under the management of Clarke & Service and left Belfast in Apr.1920 under charter to the Anchor Line for New York where she started Caribbean voyages. Officially owned by Unifruitco (a British flagged subsidiary of United Fruit Co), she was transferred to the parent company, under the US flag in Feb.1929. Requisitioned by the US Navy in 1942 and renamed USS OCTANS until 1946 when she was returned to the War Shipping Administration. She was scrapped in 1947." ["Going Bananas" 100 years of American Fruit ships in the Caribbean by Mark H. Goldberg, ISBN 1-879180-01-8 (contains photo of the ship)]

ULUNDA / ELLI 1885
Built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1885. She was a 1,789 gross ton ship, length 275ft x beam 35ft, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 16-1st (later increased to 40) and 20-2nd class passengers. Launched on 16th Apr.1885 for Halifax Steam Navigation Co., she started her maiden voyage on 8th May 1885 when she left Glasgow for Baltimore. In 1886 she went to Furness Line of West Hartlepool and started her first sailing for these owners on 13th Apr.1886 from London for Halifax and St. John NB. In August 1890 she was grounded, salvaged and sold to Canada & Newfoundland SS.Co. for the Halifax to London service. In 1898 the company, now owned by C.T. Bowring was taken over by Furness Whithy & Co. 1901 Operated by the Furness - Allan Line joint weekly service to St. John, NF. 1910 sold to Embiricos, Andros renamed ELLI by the Anglo-Hellenic SS Co.
1911 Scrapped at Garston. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1033]

ULYSSES 1913
14,499 gross tons, length 563.2ft x beam 68.4ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw, speed 13.5 knots, acommodation for 350-1st class passengers. Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Belfast, she was launched on 5th Jul.1913 for the China Mutual S. N. Co and placed on the Glasgow - Liverpool - Brisbane service. In 1915 she became a troopship and served on the Australia - Suez route with Australian troops. In 1917 she was on the North Atlantic route with American troops and in Sep.1920 resumed commercial service Glasgow - Liverpool - Cape Town - Australian ports. 1926 passenger accommodation reduced to 250-1st class and in 1936 reduced to 175-1st class. She was one of the last ships to leave Hong Kong prior to the Japanese invasion and sailed to Singapore and Australia, where she loaded a cargo for Liverpool, via Panama. On Apr.8th 1942 she was badly damaged in collision with an oil tanker and was heading for Newport News at reduced speed when, on 11th Apr.1942 she was torpedoed and sunk off Palm Beach, Florida by the U.160 with no loss of life. [Merchant Fleets, vol.6 by Duncan Haws]

UMBERTO I 1878
This was built by A.McMillan & Son, Dumbarton in 1878 for Societa Rocco Piaggio & Figli of Genoa. She was a 2,822 gross ton ship, length 360ft x beam 38ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 98-1st, 80-2nd and 800-3rd class. Launched on 15th August 1878, she sailed on her maiden voyage from Genoa for Montevideo and Buenos Aires on 10th December 1878. In 1885, the fleet was taken over by Navigazione Generale Italiana and continued on the Genoa - South America service. In 1894 she ran in the NGI Egyptian Line and in 1910 went to Soc. Nazionale di Servizi Marittimi. She was sunk by gunfire from the German submarine U.35 off Gallinara Island on 14th August 1917. [South Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor]

UMBRIA 1884
The UMBRIA was a 7,718 gross ton ship, built for Cunard SS Co in 1884 by John Elder & Co, Glasgow. Her details were - length 501.6ft x beam 57.2ft, two funnels, three masts (rigged for sail), single screw and a speed of 19 knots. There was accommodation for 550-1st and 800-3rd class passengers. Launched on 26th Jun.1884 and sailed on her maiden voyage between Liverpool, Queenstown (Cobh) and New York on 1st Nov.1884. In 1887 or earlier she had accommodation for 160-intermediate passengers added, and in May 1887 made a record passage of 6 days, 4 hours, 12 mins between Queenstown and Sandy Hook. In 1890 she was rebuilt to 8,128 gross tons and on 31st Dec.1892 arrived at New York with a broken shaft. She sailed New York - Liverpool without passengers for permanent repairs and resumed Liverpool - New York sailings on 1st Apr.1893. In Jan.1900 she made two voyages as a Boer War transport and recommenced Liverpool - Queenstown - New York voyages on 21st Jul. 1900. Her last sailing on this service started 12th Feb.1910 and she was scrapped the same year. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.153-4]

UMGENI / WINNEBA 1938
The UMGENI was a 8355 gross ton ship, length 468ft x beam 61.2ft, one funnel, two masts, refrigerated cargo space and accommodation for 108 passengers. She was twin screw with a speed of 14 knots. Built by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Newcastle, she was delivered to Bullard King's Natal Direct Line in May 1938. Used on the London-Port Elizabeth-East London-Durban-Lourenco Marques-Beira route with some calls at Cape Town. Severely damaged in the bombing of London Docks in Sep.1940 but repaired and in May 1941 she shot down a German bomber near Ireland. She was probably used on the Argentine-UK meat trade shortly after the war before returning to her regular trade. In 1957 she was sold to Elder Dempster & Co, renamed WINNEBA and used on the Tilbury-West Africa service and was scrapped in 1963. [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, Elder Dempster Line] [The Cape Run by W.Mitchell & L.Sawyer]

UNION 1866
The UNION was a 2,800 gross ton ship, length 325ft x beam 40ft, clipper stem, one funnel, two masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 11 knots. There was accommodation for 60-1st, 120-2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Built by Caird & Co, Greenock, she was launched on 27th Oct.1866 for North German Lloyd of Bremen. Her maiden voyage started on 13th Jan.1867 when she sailed from Bremen for Southampton and New York. On 28th Nov.1870 she was wrecked on Rattray Head, Aberdeenshire with no loss of life. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.545]

UNITED KINGDOM 1857
The UNITED KINGDOM was a 1,305 gross ton ship, length 245ft x beam 32.1ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts(ship rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 96-saloon cabin, 182-forward cabin and 244-steerage class passengers. Built by Robert Steele & Co, Greenock, she was launched for the Anchor Line on 13th Jun.1857. She started her maiden voyage on 4th Aug.1857 when she left Kingstown (Dun Laoghaire, Ireland) for Madras with troops of Irish regiments for the Indian Mutiny. Her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal voyage started 15th Apr.1859 and on 30th Nov.1859 she started the first of her winter sailings between Glasgow and New York. From Aug.1865 she sailed to New York only, and on 19th Apr.1869 left New York for Glasgow and disappeared with the loss of 80 lives. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.451] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line]

UNITED STATES / HANSA / INDIAN EMPIRE 1847
The ship HANSA was built by Wm H.Webb, New York in 1847 as the UNITED STATES for the American, Black Ball Line of transatlantic sailing packets. She was an 1,857 gross ton steamship, length 244.6ft x beam 48ft, clipper stem, one funnel, three masts, wooden construction, paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 100-1st and 50-2nd class passengers. Launched on 20/8/1847, she sailed from New York on her maiden voyage to Liverpool on 8/4/1848 (One round voyage). On 10/6/1848 she commenced her first voyage from New York to Southampton and Havre. Her second voyage on this route started on 5/8/1848, and on 6/12/1848 she sailed on her last voyage from New York to Southampton, Havre(dep 9/1/1849), Southampton, Halifax and New York (arr 5/2/1849). In 1849 she was sold and converted to a warship. On 31/5/1849 she sailed from New York for Liverpool where she was renamed HANSA and became a member of the German Confederation Navy. In 1853 she was bought by Fritze & Lehmkuhl of Bremen who refitted her as a merchant ship. She sailed on her first voyage for these owners from Bremen to New York on 30/8/1853 and on 17/10/1854 commenced her last sailing on this route (4 Round voyages). On 24/3/1855 she left London for the Black Sea where she became a troop transport for the Crimean War, and on 18/9/1855 returned to the UK. On 9/4/1857 she commenced a single round voyage from Bremen to New York and in 1858 was sold to the Galway Line of Ireland, renamed INDIAN EMPIRE and rebuilt to 2,516 tons. She made two transatlantic crossings for these owners (commencing 19/6/1858 and 28/9/1858) from Galway to New York. On 24/7/1861 she was damaged by fire at Deptford, London and was laid up in Victoria Dock, London, where she sank on 4/5/1866. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.194]

UNITED STATES 1860
1,202 gross tons, length 250.2ft x beam 32.2ft, clipper bows, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron hull, single screw, speed 10 knots. Accommodation for 1st, 2nd and 3rd class passengers. Launched 18th Sep.1860 by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow for the Anchor Line and started her maiden voyage Glasgow - New York on 15th Dec.1860. Her first Glasgow - Quebec - Montreal sailing was in Apr.1861 and on 26th Apr.1861 she was wrecked on Bird Rock, Gulf of St.Lawrence with the loss of one life. [North Atlantic Seaway, vol.1,p.451 by N.R.P.Bonsor]

UNITED STATES 1903
The UNITED STATES was built by A.Stephen & Sons, Glasgow in 1903 for the Scandinavia-American Line of Denmark. She was a 10,095 gross ton ship, length 500.8ft x beam 58.3ft, one funnel, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. There was accommodation for 130-1st, 140-2nd and 1,400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 30/3/1903, she sailed from Copenhagen on her maiden voyage to Christiana (Oslo), Christiansand and New York on 3/6/1903. In October 1922, her accommodation was altered to carry cabin and 3rd class only, and in February 1928 to cabin, tourist and 3rd class. She commenced her last voyage on 25/10/1934 when she left Copenhagen for Oslo, Christiansand, New York (dep 10/11/1934), Christiansand, Oslo and Copenhagen. On 2/9/1935 she was damaged by fire at Copenhagen and was scrapped the same year at Leghorn. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.3,p.1240]

URANIUM 1909 see AVOCA 1891

UTOPIA 1874
The UTOPIA was a 2,731 gross ton ship, built in 1874 by Robert Duncan & Co, Port Glasgow (engines by D&W.Henderson Ltd, Glasgow). Her details were - length 350.3ft x beam 35.2ft, straight stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was accommodation for 120-1st, 60-2nd and 600-3rd class passengers. Launched on 14/2/1874 for the Anchor Line of Glasgow, she sailed from Glasgow on her maiden voyage to Moville and New York on 23/5/1874. She started her 12th and last voyage on this service on 28/8/1875, and in 1875-76 completed two Glasgow - Liverpool - Bombay voyages. On 30/4/1876 she inaugurated a new London - New York service, and made 40 round voyages on this route, the last commencing 8/12/1881. In February 1882 she commenced Glasgow - Messina - Naples - New York - Glasgow sailings and between 1882 and 1891 made 17 Glasgow - Mediterranean - New York - Glasgow voyages. She was fitted with triple expansion engines in 1890 and refitted to carry 45-1st and 900-3rd class passengers. On 25/2/1891 she sailed from Trieste for Naples, Gibralter and New York with 3 saloon passengers, 815 Italian emigrants, a crew of 59 and 3 stowaways. On March 17th, she entered Gibraltar harbour in pitch darkness and a full gale, where the British Mediterranean Fleet was at anchor, crossed too close to the ram bow of the battleship HMS ANSON and tore a large hole in the liner's stern quarter. The UTOPIA started to sink rapidly, the lights failed and a panic ensued, the emigrants ran foreward and jumped overboard. The British Fleet sent rescue boats, but the UTOPIA sank within ten minutes with the loss of 520 emigrants, one saloon passenger and 12 crew as well as two of the naval rescuers. Because of the danger to navigation, the ship was refloated by using cofferdams and pumped clear of water and came to the surface 17 weeks after the disaster. Towed to the River Clyde, she lay idle until 1900, when she was sold and scrapped. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.460] [Merchant Fleets by Duncan Haws, vol.9, Anchor Line]

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