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The Fleets

Grace Line (W. R. Grace & Co.), New York 1882-1969

     W. R. Grace and Co. was founded in Peru in the mid-19th century by the Irish-born Grace brothers, William Russel and Michael to engage in the guano trade.
     They prospered, especially in the exporting of guano from the Chincha Islands to the United States, where this fertilizer as in considerable demand using sailing ships.
     In 1865, leaving Michael in charge of their interests in Callao, William established the firm of W.R. Grace & Co., in New York. By 1880 he had become a leading citizen and was twice elected Mayor of New York, despite opposition from Tammany. In the 1880's the company entered the steamship business with a line of freighters running from New York to the South American west coast via the Strait of Magellan flying the British flag. What later became the Grace Line originated in 1882 as a line of sailing vessels between Peru and New York.
     Grace's original British-flag ships had black hulls, white painted masts and booms, and a green stack with a black top. After the first world war sucessors were painted grey, with masts and booms of the usual mast color. Hulls became black again in 1928 and masts and booms reverted to white in 1932. (about 1959-60 Grace passenger ships again turned to grey hulls).
     The early British-flag freighters all had names beginning with C, such as CACIQUE, CAPAC, CHINCHA; Names which were later repeated in ships under the American flag.
     Later Grace started a service from the Pacific coast of the United States to the west coast of South America, and in 1913 took delivery of the 4,826 gross ton, 400-foot Santa Cruz from William Cramp & Sons of Philadelphia for this run. She was their first American flag ship and was especially designed to carry a large deckload of lumber, as well as 48 passengers. three boilers provided steam for a 2400 horsepower triple expansion engine, which gave her a speed of 11-12 knots. She introduced the green funnel with white band and black top which continued to be the Grace stack colors.
Grace established regular steamship service in 1893 with a subsidiary called the New York & Pacific Steamship Co., operating under the British flag because ships built outside the United States were banned from US registry until 1905. US-flag service began in 1912 with the Atlantic and Pacific Steamship Company. The activities of both companies and the parent firm were consolidated into the Grace Steamship Company beginning in 1916. The firm originally specialized in traffic to the west coast of South America; then expanded into the Caribbean.
     COLUSA, of 5873 gross tons and 424 feet, was also built in 1913, by Hamilton of Port Glasgow, Scotland, for the same service as the SANTA CRUZ. She was Grace's last ship for British-flag operations. Three boilers and a quadruple expansion engine of 3500 horsepower gave her a service speed of 12 knots. She too, was built to carry large loads of lumber on deck. She had four masts at first, but was later given a fifth with a 100 ton boom, and handled fully assembled steam locomotives for the South American ports. Her 36 passenger capacity was later increased to 50.
     In 1914 COLUSA was transferred to the U.S. flag and was renamed Santa Cecelia (a misspelling of CECILIA). Some of the British-flag ships were lost by enemy action, and only two were left at the end of the first world war. Grace also operated a cargo service from Seattle to Chile with way calls along the coast.
     To restore Transpacific service, Grace bought in 1915 three ships under construction in Holland; Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela, laid down for the Royal Netherlands West India Mail, these had been intended to run down to the west coast of South America via the Panama Canal, but had been sold on the stocks to the Norwegian owner Chr. Hannevig, who proposed to use them between New York and the South American east coast, a run discontinued by Lamport and Holt and Booth Line because of the war. Hannevig, however accepted Grace's offer to buy the ships before they were completed. Colombia kept her name until she was lost. This unlucky ship first ran aground on Cano Island off Costa Rica in 1923, remaining there two months. Practically her whole bottom had to be removed in drydock at Balboa. In the fall of 1931 she went to her grave on the south end of Margarita Island off lower California. Venezuela struck a mine on the way out from Holland and was repaired in England.
     In 1916 Grace decided to institute a passenger service from New York to ports on the west coast of South America as far as Valparaiso, Chile, and contracted for five ships; SANTA ANA, SANTA LUISA, SANTA TERESA (By Cramp) and SANTA ELISA and SANTA LEONORA (by New York Shipbuilding). These 110 passenger ships were 376 feet long with a gross tonnage of 5800. They had four boilers each and quadruple sxpansion engine of 3300 hp. in the Cramp ships and 3400 in the others. Their service speed of 13 knots could be exceeded by a knot.
     The United States Shipping Board took these five ships over for transport duty. By the time the troops had been carried back from France, Grace had decided that four would be sufficient for the intended service, and declined return of the SANTA LEONORA, which went to the Navy and became the submarine tender CANOPUS, ultimately lost in the Philipines early in 1942. In 1926 the secondary service from New York as far as Antofagasta, Chile was begun with the SANTA CRUZ, which was joined in the following year by SANTA CECI(E)?LIA ( ex COLUSA)
     Also in 1916, the company acquired a controlling interest in the venerable Pacific Mail Steamship Company, premier west coast and transpacific operator, which had already sold its big ships and retained only the lesser vessels of the Central American service.
     In 1921 the Shipping Board allocated five 535 ft. President class ships for Transpacific operation by Pacific Mail Line. these were PRESIDENT CLEVELAND, (ex GOLDEN STATE), PRESIDENT LINCOLN (ex HOOSIER STATE), PRESIDENT PIERCE (ex HAWKEYE STATE), PRESIDENT TAFT (ex BUCKEYE STATE) and PRESIDENT WILSON (ex EMPIRE STATE).
     COLOMBIA, ECUADOR and VENEZUELA were thus displaced and in the following year were transferred from the far east run to the intercostal run. At the same time Grace placed on the same run the freighters SANTA BARBARA, SANTA CLARA, SANTA MALTA, SANTA OLIVIA, SANTA PAULA and SANTA ROSA. These six , making connection with the President ships at San Francisco, provided fast freight service from Atlantic ports to the far east.
In 1923 the Shipping Board invited bids for the sale of the President ships operated by Pacific Mail. The Dollar Line outbid Grace and was awarded the vessels. Finding itself without ships suitable for the transpacific trade, Pacific Mail sold its registered name and goodwill to Dollar. Grace now without a transpacific connecting service, had no further use for the six intercostal freighters and sold them off to the American Hawaiian Line.
     At this time Grace formed a new entity, the Panama Mail Company, to operate the small ships formerly owned and used by the Pacific Mail in the Central American trade, these ships not having been involved in the sale to Dollar. COLOMBIA, ECUADOR and VENEZUELA also remained under Grace Ownership.
     In 1928 to meet competition from the Pacific Steam Navigation Company and the Chilean Line, Grace took delivery of SANTA BARBARA and SANTA MARIA, which were a great improvement over previous ships. As it was then permissable to build ships in foreign countries for U.S. flag operation and retain eligibility for mail contracts, these sisters were constructed by the Furness Shipbuilding Company in Haverton-on-Tees, England. Each had two 8-cylinder, 2 cycle Sulzer diesel engines of 4000 hp. apiece. They were the first large motor passenger ships to sail under the U.S. flag.
The service speed of these 150 passenger vessels was 16 knots, their overall length 480 ft. and their gross tonnage 8000. In later years , after the advent of the 18 knot SANTA CLARA, a project for increasing the speed of these ships was considered. It was proposed to install a third 4000 hp. diesel engine which would transmit power to the two propeller shafts through a generator and two electric motors. In view of their somewhat old-style passenger accommodations, however, these plans did not materialize.
     Since only four ships were required for the Valparaiso service, SANTA ANA and SANTA LUISA were transferred to the Panama Mail's New York-San Francisco run and were renamed respectively GUATEMALA and EL SALVADOR.
In 1929 SANTA INEZ and SANTA RITA joined the fleet. Apart from cruiser stern, short funnel and diesel propulsion, these ships built by Burmeister & Wain of Copenhagen, were much like the SANTA ANA class. Measuring 5000 tons and 386 ft. overall, they had accommodations for 125 passengers in two classes. Each had two six cylinder, 4 cycle, 3600 HP main engines, giving a service speed of 13 knots. SANTA RITA made 15.1 on her trials. This pain joined SANTA CECILIA and SANTA CRUZ in Grace's secondary service which was now extended to Valparaiso.
     When SANTA CLARA was added in 1930, it was decided to speed up the schedule, thus rendering superfluous SANTA ELISA and SANTA TERESA which entered the secondary service. replacing SANTA CECILIA and SANTA CRUZ. From the New York Shipbuilding Corporation, SANTA CLARA was a larger SANTA BARBARA, 20 ft. longer, two knots faster, and about the same tonnage. Her propulsion was quite different, however, two turboelectric units with a combined output of 12,000 hp. The service that had required four ships was reduced to three. SANTA BARBARA and SANTA MARIA had to do their utmost to maintain the schedule that called for about 17 knots.
     Upon COLOMBIA'S loss in 1931, the Grace ships SANTA ELISA and SANTA TERESA were transferred to Panama Mail, in order to have four vessels of the same capacity and speed on the New York San Francisco run. ECUADOR and VENEZUELA, respectively renamed SANTA OLIVIA and SANTA ISABEL took the place of these two on the secondary South American service EL SALVADOR was renamed SANTA ANA and GUATEMALA , SANTA CECILIA. The previous SANTA CECILIA had been sold to Norway.
     Late in 1932 he depression forced the suspension of the secondary service and SANTA ISABEL, SNTA INEZ, SANTA OLIVIA & SANTA RITA were tied up. This service was, however, resumed the following year.
     To comply with its mail contracts, Grace had agreed to build four new ships. These the SANTA ROSA class were ordered from Federal Shipbuilding Co. Kearney, New Jersey and delivered in 1932-1933. They were designed by William Francis Gibbs, who had also drawn plans of Matson's MALOLO and later to draw those of the AMERICA and the record-breaker UNITED STATES.
     These ships had some general resemblance to MALOLO, with her great beam and low stern. their original gross tonnage of 11,200 was later reduced to 9,100 by the cutting of tonnage openings in # 6 shelter deck. Subsequently their tonnage was again changed, all of which reduced tonnage dues and Panama Canal tolls. Their overall length was 508 ft. and beam 72 ft.
     Their power plants were at the time second to none in efficiency. Each of the water tube steam generators with a pressure of 430 lbs. produced 6000 hp. and each ship could make 18-1/2 knots with only three boilers active. The main engines were double reduction turbines. The screws turned inward, and for this reason were very awkward to maneuver. The passenger capacity of the SANTA ROSA class was 209 in first class and about 50 in steerage. Their public rooms were all on the promenade deck, with the dining salon extending two and a half decks in height to a roll back dome. The after dining room bulkhead was adorned with a large oil painting of a Grace clippper. Each cabin, whether single or double was equipped with private bath.
     With the new quartet the Grace Line established the first passenger service between New York and Seattle. Calls were made at Havana, Puerto Colombia, Cartagena, Canal Zone, Punta Arenas, La Libertad, San Jose, Mazatlan, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Victoria. The first ship the SANTA ROSA sailed November 26, 1932; the last, SANTA ELENA, April 4, 1933. New York- Seattle running time was 20 days, including one day in Los Angeles and two in San Francisco. Average speed 18-1/2 knots. Before the New York sailing, each ship called at Philadelphia for cargo only.
In 1934 the port time in New York was greatly reduced and the call at Philadelphia eliminated. The time saved enabled the ships to make a shuttle run between Seattle and San Francisco. The 20 knot service and the ship's superior accommodations to anything the Pacific Coast shipping had to offer made this an exceedingly popular run.
     It was not long before other companies complained that, since Grace ships were subsidized for foreign trade they should not compete in the coastwise business. By the end of 1934 Seattle ceased to be a port of call and the voyage ended in San Francisco. Since three ships could now maintain the service, the SANTA LUCIA was reassigned to the South American run. Late in 1936 Grace acquired the Red D Line and it's Caribbean Service, and early in 1937 SANTA ROSA, SANTA PAULA and SANTA ELENA entered that service: New York to Venezuela, Curacao, Colombia, Cristobal and Haiti.
     In addition to the services already mentioned, Grace operated several cargo runs, for which it built eight 12 knot freighters, between 1913 and 1919. These all of about 10,000 deadweight tons. They were the SANTA CATALINA, SANTA CECILIA and the six already mentioned as running intercoastal in the early 1920's. There was also a 13,000 ton tanker NORA, named for the daughter of J.P. Grace. all these freighters had been sold by 1925 and the tanker was disposed of in 1932. SANTA CATALINA by 1919 had become the USS BLACK HAWK, a destroyer tender.
     Early in 1936 Grace sold SANTA CECILIA (ex SANTA ANA) and SANTA TERESA to the Merchants & Miners Transportation Company, SANTA ELISA, SANTA ANA (ex SANTA LUISA) went to the Alaska Steamship Company. SANTA INEZ and SANTA RITA were bought by the Navy in 1940 and the SANTA BARBARA and SANTA MARIA also in 1940. SANTA OLIVIA and SANTA ISABEL were also sold.
     The Navy took over the SANTA LUCIA in 1942 ; as the USS LEEDSTOWN, she was sunk in the North African invasion. The SANTA ELENA was sunk the following year off the Philippville on the Algerian coast. SANTA CLARA as the SUSAN B. ANTHONY went down in the Normandy invasion.
     Of the ships built before 1939 only the SANTA ROSA and SANTA PAULA survived. They continued to be the flagships of the fleet until 1958 when they were replaced by sister ships of the same name.
     The Government had six uncompleted C2 type hulls and these were offered to Grace Line. Grace Line accepted the offer and had them converted to 52 passenger vessels. These "combos" became very popular and were a huge success and Grace Line had three more built. The first six were fitted out to carry bananas from Ecuador to New York. The last three were to be on the Caribbean run and were not equipped to carry bananas. Graces postwar fleet consisted of the nine combos, the Santa Rosa and Santa Paula, (which had been returned to Grace Line and refitted again to the liners that they once were) and nine C2 freighters. The Santa Rosa and Santa Paula served the Caribbean calling at Curacao, La Guaira, Aruba, Kingston, Port au Prince and Port Everglades, sailing from New York every two weeks. The three Caribbean "combos" called at Santo Domingo, Puerto Cabello, La Guaira, Maracaibo, Barranquilla, Cartagena, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. The other six "combos" along with the C2 Freighters sailed from New York to the West Coast of South America as far as Valparaiso.
     In 1956 Grace decided to replace the Santa Rosa and Santa Paula with two new vessels. The new vessels a Gibbs & Cox design were to be called Santa Rosa and Santa Paula. They were 15,000 gross tons and 584 feet overall with an 84 foot beam. The first vessel the Santa Rosa was delivered in 1958. and the second Santa Paula soon followed. At this time cargo costs were escalating and cargo offerings to Venezuelan ports were declining and Grace decided that with the Santa Rosa and Santa Paula and two freighters being converted to all container vessels would meet the requirements in the Caribbean. The Santa Eliana and Santa Leonor two C2 type vessels were converted to all container vessels. These were the first American container vessels in foreign trade. The converted Santa Eliana sailed for Venezuela January 1960 with 176 containers containing powdered milk and other general cargoes. The longshoremen refused to unload the containers even though some sort of a previous agreement had been made by the agency. After 18 days an agreement was reached and the Santa Eliana was unloaded with the provision that no more vessels of this type would be used. The sailing of the Santa Leonor was canceled and both vessels were laid up.
     In 1959 The Saint Lawrence Seaway opened and Grace obtained approval for an operational subsidy for the Great Lakes route. The route would serve ports on the Great Lakes to Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Barbados and ports on the north coast of Venezuela and Colombia. The decision to operate to the Great Lakes proved to be a financial disaster for Grace and the run was given up after one season.
     In 1960 Grace Line decided to replace the aging "Combos" with four new 20 knot passenger vessels to carry approximately 100 passengers. These vessels were to serve the west coast of South America. They were 20,000 displacement tons 546 feet long with a 79 foot beam. The names were chosen to honor the four countries, Panama, Colombia, Ecuador & Peru They were designed with all new advanced cargo carrying devices. Each was fitted out to carry 360,000 cubic feet of bananas (90,000 stems approx. 4000 tons) in three holds, on the southbound voyage these areas were used for carrying autos or palletized cargoes which were loaded by a special pallet handling system. There were 5 cargo elevators in 3 holds. The other two holds were container holds. There were four gantry cranes on deck which when married in pairs could handle 40 foot containers. Container capacity was 175 twenty foot containers. The four "M" ships, as they were called carried 125 first class passengers. Public rooms were spacious and tastefully decorated and there was a large outside tiled swimming pool.
      About this time Grace decided to replace the aging freighters and six new freighters were built, The first of these was the Santa Lucia and these ships became known as the "L" ships. They were modern vessels with refrigerated compartments for Chilean fruit and Ecuadorian bananas. They were equipped for 12 passengers in luxurious staterooms and had seven hatches with 10 ton booms and two 30 ton booms and a 80 ton jumbo boom.
     Things were normal until 1969 when the parent company W.R. Grace decided to go out of the steamship business and concentrate on chemical and other company ventures. Grace Line was sold to Prudential Line, a small line owned by Skouras of 20th Century Fox. At first the line was called Prudential Grace Lines and later the Grace was dropped and it became just Prudential Line. The ships were operated as before with most of the same personnel aboard but in 1970 Prudential decided to suspend the Caribbean service and the Santa Rosa and Santa Paula were laid up, never to sail under the American Flag again. The "M" ships were sailed as freighters until 1972 when three were transferred to the west coast. They were once again returned to passenger ship status. They sailed from San Francisco, north to Tacoma and Vancouver thence through the Panama Canal calling at ports on the east coast of South America then through the Strait of Magellan to call at ports on the west coast of South America and thence return to Los Angeles and San Francisco. This was a 59 day voyage. The Santa Magdalena remained on the east coast until 1974 when she too was transferred to the west coast to sail with the other three.
     In 1978 the Prudential Line was taken over by Delta Lines, In 1983 there was a sharp drop in cargo bookings to South America and operations began to wind down. The six "L" class freighters were laid up and finally sold. The four "M" ships continued to run until 1984 when all operation of the former Grace Line Santas ceased.
     At its peak, the Grace Line was a major force in American merchant shipping. Shortly after World War II it owned 23 ships totaling 188,000 gross tons, plus 14 more on bareboat charters.

Many thanks to Henk Jungerius and Ted Finch for their assistance in collecting this data. The following list was extracted from various sources. This is not an all inclusive list but should only be used as a guide. If you would like to know more about a vessel, visit the Ship Descriptions (onsite) or Immigrant Ship web site.

Funnel:
1882-1913 Green with black top
1913-1969 Green funnel with broad white band and black top.

Fleet:

1882-1913 1913-1969
Vessel Built Years in Service Tons
A & J Mercury   see Santa Monica (4)  
Aurora 1876 1917 purchased from Sir Ernest Shackleton, Liverpool in Australlia and went missing on delivery voyage from Sydney to Iquique. 580
Aztec 1894 1915 taken over from Pacific Mail SS Co., 1917 torpedoed and sunk in English Channel by U.46. 3,508
Buckeye State 1921 1921 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1923 returned to USSB. 14,123
Cacique (1) 1893 1908 burnt off Ecuador coast. 3,052
Cacique (2) 1910 1914 purchased from New York & Pacific SS Co., 1918-1919 U.S. Navy requisition, 1934 scrapped Osaka. 4,890
Cacique (3) 1935 see Garfield.  
Capac (1) 1893 1920 sold to Hebburn Transport Co., London, 1924 sold Itlay renamed Marco, 1932 scrapped. 3,052
Capac (2) 1919 ex- Deuel, 1926 purchased from US Shipping Board renamed Capac, 1940 sold to Panama renamed Cardina, 1942 torpedoed and shelled by Italian submarine Archimede. 5,586
Carabobo 1923 1937 transferred from Atlantic and Caribbean Steam Navigation Co. not renamed and sold to Northland Transp.Co. renamed North Coast, 1946 sold to Philippines renamed Mayon, 1955 caught fire, beached, towed to Manila and scrapped. 2,916
Caracas 1927 1937 transferred from Atlantic and Caribbean Steam Navigation Co. not renamed, 1938 sold to Alaska SS Co. renamed Denali.1955 sold to Peninsular & Occidental SS Co, New Haven renamed Cuba, 1955 transferred to Liberian registry renamed Southern Cross, 1960 scrapped. 3,365
Celia 1904 1918 torpedoed and sunk off Cape de Creus by UB.48. 5,004
Charcas (1) 1906 1914 sunk by German cruiser Prinz Eitel Friedrich off Valparaiso. 5,067
Charcas (2) 1919 ex- West Inskip, 1926 purchased from US Shipping Board renamed Charcas, 1940 sold to Panama renamed Carreta, 1947 renamed Parita Sun, 1953 scrapped. 5,555
Chimu 1910 see Cumbal (1).  
Chimu   see Santa Catalina (2).  
Chincha (1) 1912 1918 sold to Nafra Co., NY, 1920 Green Star SS Corp., NY, 1923 Planet SS Co., NY, 1929 American South African Line, NY, 1939 sold to Babarovic, Ant, Yugoslavia renamed Milena, 1941 to Panama renamed Gloria, 1950 scrapped . 6,348
Chincha (2) 1935 see Nosa King.  
Chipana (1) 1907 1921 sold to Wilh. Wilhelmsen, Tonsberg renamed Toluma, 1932 scrapped. 5,549
Chipana (2) 1920 ex- Oklahoma City, 1929 purchased from US Shipping Board renamed Nosa Prince, 1935 renamed Chipana, 1945 sold to States Marine Lines not renamed, 1947 sold to Norway renamed Eidsli, 1950 sold to Italy renamed Naty, 1959 scrapped. 3,280
Cholita 1903 ex- Ballynass, 1907 purchased from U.K. renamed Cholita, 1910 sold France. 306
City of Panama 1924 see Santa Catalina (2).  
City of Para 1878 1915 taken over from Pacific Mail SS Co., 1924 scrapped. 3,532
City of San Francisco 1924 see Santa Monica (1).  
Colombia 1915 1916 purchased from Koninklijke West Indische Maildienst by Pacific Mail SS Co., 1925 purchased by Panama Mail SS Co. (W. R. Grace & Co), 1931 stranded and lost on Margarita Island, Baja California. 5,644
Columbia 1912 1919 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1923 sold to A. Mahoney, San Francisco, 1924 wrecked Coos Bay, Oregon. 1,923
Colusa 1913 1914 renamed Santa Cecelia, 1931 sold to Greece renamed Nideros, 1933 Sold to Norway renamed Lyngenfjord, 1938 wrecked. 5,873
Condor (1) 1893 1914 captured and sunk by German cruiser Karlsruhe off Cabo San Roque. 3,053
Condor (2) 1927 see Rotarian.  
Corinto 1905 ex- Caldas, 1922 purchased from Caribbean SS Co., NY renamed Corinto, 1935 renamed Mayan, 1939 sold Santo Domingo renamed San Rafael, 1942 torpedoed and sunk in Caribbean by U.125. 2,007
Corocoro 1896 1897 wrecked in Straits of Magellan. 4,006
Coya (1) 1886 ex- Bayley, 1892 purchased from C. Barton, London renamed Coya, 1895 sold to Peru renamed La Constitucion. 2,607
Coya (2) 1895 1920 sold to Kyle Transport Co., London, 1924 sold to Hamburg owners renamed Katharina Biesterfeld, 1924 scrapped. 3,040
Coya (3) 1927 see Orcus.  
Creole State 1920 1920 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1922 returned to USSB. 10,533
Cuba 1897 built as Coblenz for North German Lloyd, 1917 seized by U.S renamed Sachem, 1920 purchased renamed Cuba, 1923 wrecked Santa Barbara Channel, Calif. 3,169
Cumbal (1) 1900 1910 renamed Chimu, 1919 sold to Northern & Mediterranean Lines, London, 1919 wrecked Cape Cornwall. 4,259
Cumnbal (2) 1936 see Santa Monica (1).  
Curaca (1) 1912 1912 6,386 tons, 1931 sold to Argonaut SS Line, Panama, 1934 scrapped. 6,386
Curaca (2) 1920 ex- Atlanta of Texas, 1929 purchased from US Shipping Board renamed Nosa Queen, 1935 renamed Curaca, 1945 sold to States Marine Lines not renamed 1947 sold to Norway renamed Eidsbu, 1950 sold to Italy renamed Nica, 1954 abandoned on fire in Indian Ocean. 3,280
Cuzco (1) 1899 1910 sold to Wilh. Wilhelmsen, Tonsberg, 1919 sold Italy, 1932 scrapped. 4,302
Cuzco (2) 1919 ex- West Kasson, 1926 purchased from US Shipping Board renamed Cuzco, 1940 sold to Panama renamed Carmona, 1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-160. 5,496
Ecuador 1915 1916 purchased from Koninklijke West Indische Maildienst by Pacific Mail SS Co., 1925 purchased by Panama Mail SS Co., 1931 transferred to Grace SS Co. renamed Santa Olivia, 1936 sold to Libby, Mcneill & Libby renamed David W. Branch, 1947 sold to Panama renamed Luxor, 1948 sold to Israel renamed Negbah, 1956 scrapped. 5,544
El Salvador   see Santa Luisa.  
Empire State 1921 1921 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1923 returned to USSB. 14,127
Falcon 1919 laid down as War Shield for the Shipping Controller but completed as Rock Island for US Shipping Board, 1925 renamed Falcon for Atlantic and Caribbean Steam Navigation Co. 1937 transferred to Grace Line, 1948 scrapped. 2,966
Garfield 1918 1920 purchased from US Shipping Board, 1929 renamed Nosa Chief, 1935 renamed Cacique, 1946 scrapped. 2,941
Golden State 1921 1921 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1923 returned to USSB. 14,123
Granite State 1920 1920 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1922 returned to USSB. 10,533
Guatemala   see Santa Ana (1).  
Gulf Banker   see Santa Nora.  
Gulf Farmer   see Santa Cruz (3)  
Gulf Merchant 1944 ex- Margaret Lykes, 1947 purchased from Lykes Lines renamed Gulf Merchant, 1964 to Delta SS Lines, New Orleans renamed Del Aires. 8,159
Gulf Shipper 1944 ex- Vinton, 1947 from US Maritime Commission renamed Gulf Shipper, 1964 to American President Lines renamed President Harding. 8,189
Gulf Trader 1943 ex- Citrus Packer, 1958 from Waterman SS Co., Mobile renamed Gulf Trader, 1965 to Pan American Tankers Corp, NY renamed Bowling Green. 6,134
Hawkeye State 1921 1921 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1923 returned to USSB. 14,123
Hoosier State 1921 1921 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1923 returned to USSB. 14,187
Lara 1919 laid down as War Dart for the Shipping Controller but completed as Moline for US Shipping Board, 1925 renamed Lara for Atlantic and Caribbean Steam Navigation Co., 1937 transferred to Grace Line, 1948 scrapped. 2,967
Maximus   see Santa Monica (3)  
Mayan 1935 see Corinto.  
Mineola 1918 1920 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1932 renamed Nosa Duke, 1933 sold to Northland Transportation Co., Seattle renamed North Wind, 1944 wrecked Alaska. 2,488
Mount Tabor 1882 1890 chartered from Smith & Service, Glasgow and then purchased, 1898 burnt off Socotra. 2,301
Newport 1880 1915 taken over from Pacific Mail SS Co., 1924 sold to Chas. L. Dimon, New York, 1930 scrapped. 2,735
Nora 1920 Tanker, 1934 sold to Standard Oil Co. Of New Jersey renamed F W Abrams, 1942 accidentally damaged in US minefield and sank off Cape Hatteras, 1954 wreck raised and scrapped. 9,310
Nosa Chief   see Garfield.  
Nosa Duke   see Mineola.  
Nosa King 1920 ex- Capital of Nebraska, 1929 acquired from US Shipping Board renamed Nosa King, 1935 renamed Chincha (2), 1937 sold to Griffiths SS Co., Wilmington, Del. renamed Stanley A. Griffiths. 3,545
Nosa Prince   see Chipana.  
Nosa Queen   see Curaca.  
Orcus 1919 1924 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1927 renamed Coya, 1940 to MOWT, London renamed Empire Tiger, 1941 went missing in North Atlantic. 4,954
Pennsylvania 1872 1915 taken over from Pacific Mail SS Co., 1918 burnt off Chile. 3,129
Peru 1892 1915 taken over from Pacific Mail SS Co., 1919 sold to France renamed Lux, 1920 went missing at sea. 3,528
Point Adams 1918 1920 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1923 sold to Hammond Lumber Co., San Francisco renamed Astoria. 2,671
Point Bonita 1918 1920 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1923 sold to Hammond Lumber Co., San Francisco renamed San Pedro. 2,676
Point Judith 1918 1920 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1924 sold to Swayne & Hoyt, San Francisco. 2,670
Point Lobos 1918 1920 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1924 sold to Swayne & Hoyt, San Francisco. 2,671
Rotarian 1920 built for US Shipping Board, 1924 purchased not renamed, 1927 renamed Condor, 1940 to Great Britain renamed Empire Elk, 1942 to Norway renamed Norvarg, 1946 to Wallem & Co., Panama not renamed, 1947 sold to China renamed Nan Chiang, 1950 sold to Hong Kong renamed Northern Glow, 1956 sold to China renamed Hoping 46, ( Hoping Ssu Shi Liu ), 1979 Zhan Dou 46. 4,747
San Jose 1882 1915 taken over from Pacific Mail SS Co., 1921 wrecked Asuncion Island. 2,081
San Juan 1882 1915 taken over from Pacific Mail SS Co., 1925 to Panama Mail SS Co. 2,076
Santa Adela   see Santa Margarita.  
Santa Alicia (1) 1912 ex- John A. Hooper, 1917 purchased from Sudden & Christensen, San Francisco renamed Santa Alicia, 1922 sold to Western Mercantile Marine Corp, San Francisco renamed Edna Christenson. 2,244
Santa Alicia (2) 1945 ex- Coringa, ex- Agwidawn, ex- Seasplendor 1949, 1957 purchased renamed Santa Alicia, 1960 sold renamed Green Point, 1969 scrapped. 6,161
Santa Alicia (3) 1944 ex- Griggs, ex- Mormacrey 1948, 1966 purchased renamed Santa Alicia, 1973 scrapped. 7,980
Santa Ana (1) 1918 1928 renamed Guatemala, 1931 renamed Santa Cecilia, 1936 sold to Merchants & Miners Transportation Company renamed Irwin, 1941 to US Government renamed John L. Clem, 1948 scrapped. 4,870
Santa Ana (2)   see Santa Luisa.  
Santa Ana (3) 1940 1964 sold renamed Vega Star, 1965 damaged by stranding, 1967 scrapped. 8,095
Santa Ana (4) 1943 laid down as Sea Eagle but completed as Custer, ex- Mormacmar 1948, 1966 purchased renamed Santa Ana, 1973 scrapped. 8,007
Santa Anita (1) 1944 ex- Cape Cumberland, 1955 purchased renamed Santa Anita, 1966 renamed Santa Victoria, 1971 scrapped. 6,689
Santa Anita (2) 1944 ex- Grundy, ex- Mormacsurf 1948, 1966 purchased renamed Santa Anita, 1973 scrapped. 7,980
Santa Barbara (1) 1916 1925 sold to American Hawaiian Steamship Co. renamed American, 1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-504. 4,846
Santa Barbara (2) 1928 1940 to US Government renamed McCawley, 1942 bombed by Japanese aircraft and later rorpedoed and sunk by error by US PT boat. 7,858
Santa Barbara (3) 1943 1946 to United States Maritime Commission renamed Norseman, 1947 reverted to Grace Line renamed Santa Flavia, 1970 scrapped. 6,507
Santa Barbara (4) 1946 1963 renamed Santa Monica, 1969 scrapped. 8,357
Santa Barbara (5) 1967 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed. 9,313
Santa Catalina (1) 1913 to US Government renamed Black Hawk n/a
Santa Catalina (2) 1924 ex- City of Panama, Pacific Mail SS Co., 1925 transferred to Panama Mail SS Co. (Grace & Co.), 1931 renamed Santa Catalina, 1935 renamed Chimu, 1938 sold to United Baltic Corp, London renamed Baltavia. 2,461
Santa Catalina (3) 1939 ex- Flying Cloud, 1941 purchased from United States Maritime Commission renamed Santa Catalina, 1941 to US Navy renamed Jupiter, 1947 to USN reserve, 1971 scrapped. 6,085
Santa Catalina (4) 1943 1943 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-129 off Georgia. 6,507
Santa Catalina (5) 1944 1968 scrapped. 8,207
Santa Cecelia 1914 see Colusa.  
Santa Cecilia (1) 1913 1918 sold to the Nafra Co., NY.,1935 scrapped. 6,310
Santa Cecilia (2) 1931 see Santa Ana (1).  
Santa Cecilia (3) 1942 1946 to United States Maritime Commission renamed Silver Star, 1947 reverted to Grace Line renamed Santa Juana, 1971 scrapped . 6,507
Santa Cecilia (4) 1946 1968 sold renamed Julia, 1970 scrapped. 8,207
Santa Clara (1) 1913 1925 sold to American Hawaiian Steamship Co. renamed Columbian, 1945 to USSR renamed Kapitan Smirnov, 1963 converted to refrigerated fish store, 1971 scrapped. 4,954
Santa Clara (2) 1930 1942 to US Government renamed Susan B Anthony, 1944 mined and sunk off Omaha Beach, wreck later scrapped. 8,183
Santa Clara (3) 1946 1961 sold not renamed, 1970 scrapped. 8,207
Santa Clara (4)   see Santa Mariana.  
Santa Clara (5) 1966 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed. 9,322
Santa Cristina (1) 1917 wooden hull. 1919 sank after explosion North of Havana. 2,119
Santa Cristina (2) 1945 ex- Flying Arrow, 1957 purchased renamed Santa Cristina, 1961 sold renamed Green Cove, 1971 scrapped. 6,161
Santa Cristina (3)   see Santa Isabel (2)  
Santa Cruz (1) 1913 1917-1920 chartered to Pacific Mail Steamship Co., 1930 sold to A.H. Bull Steamship Co. Inc. renamed Barbara, 1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-126. 4,826
Santa Cruz (2) 1941 laid down as Cape San Martin completed as Santa Cruz, 1943 rebuilt as a troop transporter, 1946 to USMC and laid up, 1970 scrapped. 6,705
Santa Cruz (3) 1942 ex- Storm King, 1947 purchased from United States Maritime Commission renamed Santa Cruz, 1947 renamed Gulf Farmer, 1964 sold renamed Ranger, 1970 scrapped. 7,002
Santa Cruz (4) 1966 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed, 19?? to US Government and laid up, 2003 sold for scrap. 9,313
Santa Elena (1) 1917 wooden hull, 1920 burnt at Valparaiso while discharging cargo. 1,928
Santa Elena (2) 1933 1943 bombed and sunk by German aircraft . 9,135
Santa Elena (3)   see Santa Maria (3)  
Santa Elena (4) 1967 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed, 19?? to US Government and laid up, 2003 sold for scrap, 2004 scrapped. 9,314
Santa Eliana (1) 1944 ex- White Falcon, 1947 purchased from United States Maritime Commission renamed Santa Eliana, 1960 converted into a container ship 10,410 tons, 1964 sold renamed Sea, 1965 sold renamed Mayaguez, 1979 scrapped. 8,258
Santa Eliana (2) 1944 ex- Mendocino, ex- P & T Seafarer, ex- Mormacwind 1957, 1966 purchased renamed Santa Eliana, 1973 sold renamed Eliana, 1973 scrapped. 8,010
Santa Elisa (1) 1919 1933 sold to Panama Mail SS Co., San Francisco, 1936 sold to Alaska Steamship Company renamed Baranof, 1955 scrapped. 4,800
Santa Elisa (2) 1941 1942 torpdoed and sunk by Italian MTB’s. 8,380
Santa Elisa (3) 1944 1968 sold renamed Venetia V, 1969 scrapped. 8,297
Santa Emilia 1945 ex- American Banker, 1963 purchased from United States Lines renamed Santa Emilia, 1968 sold renamed Galicia Defender, 1968 sold renamed Fairview, 1970 sold renamed Eugenia, 1971 scrapped. 8,211
Santa Fe 1944 ex- Cape Spear, ex- Agwiprincess 1948, ex- Mexico, 1954 purchased renamed Santa Fe, 1971 scrapped. 6,713
Santa Flavia (1) 1917 wooden hull. 1922 sold to H.W.Crosby, Seattle, 1923 sold to International Packing Co., Seattle, 1929 Alaska Fisherman's Co-Operative Packing Co., Juneau, 1930 converted to floating cannery, 1936 burnt out. 2,133
Santa Flavia (2)   see Santa Barbara (3)  
Santa Ines 1944 1968 sold renamed Mantonna, 1969 Grand Ocean, 1973 scrapped. 8,207
Santa Inez (1) 1908 ex- Falcon, 1918 purchased from C. Nelson Co., Portland, Maine renamed Santa Inez, 1922 sold to Crowley & Mahony, San Francisco, 1940 sold China, 1941 wrecked. 1,838
Santa Inez (2) 1929 1947 sold to US Government renamed Bowditch, 1948 laid up, 1959 scrapped. 4,576
Santa Isabel (1) 1917 wooden hull, 1921 sold to Gonzalez Sofia y Cia., Valparaiso renamed Iquique, 1921 burned at sea off Coquimbo. 1,919
Santa Isabel (2) 1931 see Venezuela.  
Santa Isabel (3) 1939 ex- Empire Egret, 1942 returned from MOWT renamed Santa Isabel, 1946 to US Maritime Commission renamed Guiding Star, 1973 scrapped. 7,169
Santa Isabel (4) 1946 1967 renamed Santa Cristina, 1968 sold renamed Sofia, 1970 scrapped. 8,207
Santa Isabel (5) 1967 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed, 19?? to US Government and laid up, 2003 sold for scrap. 9,314
Santa Juana   see Santa Cecilia (2)  
Santa Leonor (1) 1944 1960 converted to 10,410 ton container ship, 1964 sold to Sea Land Servics renamed Land. 1965 renamed Ponce, 1978 scrapped. 8,258
Santa Leonor (2) 1944 ex- Riverside, ex- P & T Forester, ex- Mormacwave, 1966 purchased from Moore-McCormack Line renamed Santa Leonor, 1968 ashore on Isabel island, Straits of Magellan, abandoned and later sank. 8,010
Santa Leonora 1918 1919 sold to US Navy renamed Canopus, 1942 scuttled off Bataan. 5,281
Santa Lucia (1) 1933 1942 to US Government renamed Leedstown, 1942 damaged by torpedo from German submarine U-331 and later bombed and sunk by German aircraft off Algiers. 9,135
Santa Lucia (2) 1967 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed. 9,314
Santa Luisa (1) 1918 1928 renamed El Salvador, 1931 renamed Santa Ana, 1931 sold to Alaska Steamship Company renamed Mount McKinley, 1942 wrecked. 4,847
Santa Luisa (2) 1946 1969 sold renamed Luisa, 1970 scrapped. 8,207
Santa Magdalena 1963 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed, 1980 transferred to Delta Line not renamed, 1984 laid up, 1988 scrapped. 14,442
Santa Malta (1) 1919 1925 sold to American Hawaiian Steamship Co. renamed Hawaiian, 1949 sold to Providencia Shipping Co., Panama renamed Fortune, 1958 scrapped. 6,264
Santa Malta (2) 1943 ex- Flyaway, ex- Charles E. Dant 1947, ex- Utah 1957, 1957 purchased renamed Santa Malta, 1970 sold renamed Santa, 1970 stranded and scrapped.
8,292
Santa Margarita (1) 1942 1946 to United States Maritime Commission renamed Alboni, 1947 reverted to Grace Line renamed Santa Adela, 1970 scrapped. 6,507
Santa Margarita (2) 1946 1968 scrapped. 8,207
Santa Maria (1) 1884 1893 purchased from California SS Co., 1896 sold Peru. 344
Santa Maria (2) 1928 1940 to US Government renamed Barnett, 1946 reverted to Grace Line renamed Santa Maria, 1948 sold to A. Lauro renamed Surriento, 1966 scrapped. 7,857
Santa Maria (3) 1942 1946 to United States Maritime Commission renamed Cherubim, 1948 sold to Waterman SS Co., Mobile renamed Claiborne, 1967 sold not renamed, 1971 scrapped. 6,507
Santa Maria (4) 1946 1963 renamed Santa Elena, 1968 renamed Santa Sofia, 1969 sold renamed Sun, 1970 scrapped. 8,207
Santa Maria (5) 1963 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed, 1980 transferred to Delta Line not renamed, 1984 laid up, 1988 scrapped. 14,442
Santa Mariana (1) 1944 ex- Belle of the West, ex- Agwiqueen 1947, ex- Seaborne, 1957 purchased renamed Santa Mariana, 1962 renamed Santa Clara, 1963 sold renamed Thunderhead, 1969 scrapped. 6,161
Santa Mariana (2) 1963 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed, 1980 transferred to Delta Line not renamed, 1984 laid up, 1988 scrapped. 14,442
Santa Mercedes (1) 1944 ex- New Hanover, ex- Alawai 1947, ex- Franklin Berwin 1955, 1957 purchased renamed Santa Mercedes, 1960 sold renamed Green Wave, 1966 sold renamed Sagamore Hill, 1970 scrapped. 8,205
Santa Mercedes (2) 1963 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed, 1980 transferred to Delta Line not renamed, 1983 sold converted into a trainingship renamed Patriot State. 14,442
Santa Monica (1) 1924 ex- City of San Francisco, Pacific Mail SS Co., 1925 transferred to Panama Mail SS Co. (Grace & Co.),1931 renamed Santa Monica, 1936 renamed Cumbal, 1938 sold to United Baltic Corp, London renamed Baltabor. 2,461
Santa Monica (2) 1939 ex- Red Jacket, 1941 purchased from United States Maritime Commission renamed Santa Monica, 1946 reverted to United States Maritime Commission renamed Bonita, 1974 scrapped. 6,085
Santa Monica (3)   see Santa Barbara (4)  
Santa Monica (4) 1946 1963 renamed Maximus, 1963 renamed A & J Mercury, 1964 renamed Santa Monica, 1966 sold Cosmos Trader, 1969 scrapped. 8,610
Santa Nora 1944 ex- Alden Besse, 1947 1947 purchased from United States Maritime Commission renamed Santa Nora, 1947 renamed Gulf Banker, 1964 sold Glory of the Seas, 1969 scrapped. 7,002
Santa Olivia (1) 1918 1925 sold to American Hawaiian Steamship Co. renamed Kansan, 1946 sold to Star Line, Panama renamed Jackstar, 1955 scrapped. 4,870
Santa Olivia (2)   see Ecuador.  
Santa Olivia (3) 1944 ex- Napier, 1946 purchased renamed Santa Olivia, 1968 scrapped. 8,297
Santa Paula (1) 1917 1925 sold to American Hawaiian Steamship Co. renamed Montanan, 1943 torpedoed and sunk by Japanese submarine I-27 in Indian Ocean. 4,897
Santa Paula (2) 1932 1958 laid up, 1961 sold to Typaldos Lines renamed Acropolis, 1968 laid up, 1977 scrapped. 9,135
Santa Paula (3) 1958 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed, 1971 laid up, 1972 sold to Oceanic Sun Line Special Shipping Co. renamed Stella Polaris, 1978 became a hotel ship in Kuwait, 1991 damaged by fire, cannibalised for parts to repair her sister Santa Rosa (Emerald) and scrapped. 15,366
Santa Regina (1) 1943 ex- John Land, ex- Jeff Davis 1949, ex- Sea Comet II 1953, 1957 purchased renamed Santa Regina, 1961 sold renamed African Gulf, 1963 sold renamed Norberto Capay, 1968 sold for demolition, 1969 scrapped. 6,119
Santa Regina (2) 1941 ex- Mormactide, ex- Lyon 1942, ex- Mormactide 1946, 1967 purchased renamed Santa Regina, 1972 scrapped. 7,954
Santa Rita (1) 1913 ex- William Chatham, 1917 purchased from C. J. Lancaster, San Francisco renamed Santa Rita, 1922 sold to A. Mahoney, San Francisco, 1923 wrecked Vancouver Island. 1,600
Santa Rita (1) 1929 1940 to US Government renamed William Ward Burrows, 1946 laid up, 1957 scrapped. 4,576
Santa Rita (2) 1941 1942 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-172 in North Atlantic. 8,380
Santa Rita (3) 1944 1968 scrapped. 8,205
Santa Rosa (1) 1917 1925 sold to American Hawaiian Steamship Co. renamed Oregonian, 1942 sunk in Russian convoy by aerial torpedo from German aircraft. 4,862
Santa Rosa (2) 1932 1958 laid up, 1961 sold to Typaldos Lines renamed Athinai, 1967 laid up, 1989 scrapped. 9,135
Santa Rosa (3) 1958 1970 transferred to Prudential Grace Lines not renamed, 1971 laid up, 1989 sold not renamed, 1992 towed to Greece for rebuilding as a cruise ship and Regent Rainbow for Regency Cruise Line, Regency were declared bankrupt soon afterwards, 1996 sold to Louis Cruises renamed The Emerald. 15,371
Santa Sofia (1) 1946 1963 renamed A & J Faith, 1964 renamed Santa Sofia, 1966 sold Cosmos Mariner, 1970 scrapped. 8,207
Santa Sofia (2)   see Santa Maria (3)  
Santa Tecla 1918 1936 sold to Trans Oceanic SS Co., NY, 1937 sold to Italy renamed Snia Amba, 1940 torpedoed by Royal Navy, towed to Benghazi and scuttled as blockship. 2,492
Santa Teresa (1) 1918 1933 transferred to Panama Mail SS Co., 1936 sold to Merchants & Miners Transp. Co., Baltimore renamed Kent, 1941 to US Army renamed Ernest Hinds, 1957 scrapped. 4,858
Santa Teresa (2) 1940 1963 sold renamed Eldorado, 1964 renamed Express Baltimore, 1968 scrapped. 8,095
Santa Victoria (1) 1945 laid down as Expounder but completed as Wild Hunter, ex- Oregon 1947, 1957 purchased renamed Santa Victoria, 1960 sold to States Marine Lines renamed Sooner State, 1970 sold renamed Reliance Dignity, 1971 scrapped. 8,292
Santa Victoria (2)   see Santa Anita.  
Solana 1921 1925 sold to Associated Oil Co., San Francisco. 6,703
Stag Hound 1939 1940 requisitioned by US Navy renamed USS Aldebaran, 1975 scrapped. 7,169
Tachira 1920 ex- Antonio, 1922 purchased from Spain by McDougall Duluth SB Co., Duluth renamed Elizabeth R. 1922 sold to Atlantic and Caribbean Steam Navigation Co. renamed Tachira, 1937 transferred to Grace Line, 1942 torpedoed and sunk by U.129. 2,325
Venezuela 1915 1916 purchased from Koninklijke West Indische Maildienst by Pacific Mail SS Co., 1925 purchased by Panama Mail SS Co., 1931 Transferred to Grace SS Co. renamed Santa Isabel, 1939 scrapped. 5,641
Wolverine State 1920 1920 acquired from US Shipping Board, 1922 returned to USSB. 10,533

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